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View Full Version : grooming at an A show..



saaskya
Mar. 25, 2012, 12:43 PM
i have been offered to groom at a few A shows this summer for a friend, who is a pro and would be bringing 4 horses. his boss would be hiring me.

how much do you charge as a groom/pay your groom for these shows. only one hunter, and i dont have to braid it. i would share a hotel room with trainer and they'd cover my food, which i dont anticipate there being much time to eat, haha. but, for 4 horses for 3-4 days, i was thinking $50/horse/day or at least $100 a day, which would be minimum for it to work financially for me.

am i way off base? i am a professional groom and have lots of grooming experience at shows, but ive never been hired out before. i was hoping yall could give me some ideas on whats normal. thanks :)

PonyPenny
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:09 PM
I would charge no less than $50.00/horse per day plus tip. The usual tip is $15.00 per day. Make sure you get paid immediately after the show ends. Are the clients paying you directly or are you being paid by the trainer?

Jsalem
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:21 PM
$200 per day plus tips to groom for 4 horses? Probably not.

EmJ628
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:25 PM
When I have groomed for friends before on local circuits I have been paid $100 a day, they also paid my lodging, gas and food. I was usually worrying about more than 4 horses (and keeping track of the kids!) but not braiding. So I'd expect at least that much if not a little more for the A circuit. Have fun!

Herbie19
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:32 PM
$200 per day plus tips to groom for 4 horses? Probably not.

Yeah, good luck with that. You're more than likely be offered $100/day plus hotel and a tab at the foodstand. I'm a little confused...you're a professional groom but you've never been paid? Make sure you completely understand what is expected of you before you dive in! Being an A horse show groom is not for the faint of heart.

AlyssaSpellman
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:39 PM
Yeah, good luck with that. You're more than likely be offered $100/day plus hotel and a tab at the foodstand. I'm a little confused...you're a professional groom but you've never been paid? Make sure you completely understand what is expected of you before you dive in! Being an A horse show groom is not for the faint of heart.

:yes:

saaskya
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:54 PM
im a groom for foxhunters and showjumpers. they dont travel a ton, and away traveling has been tipped or food comped as its 'part of the job'. ive groomed a lot at shows and at home as a working student for previous dressage and hunter trainers. i know what to expect as far as duties, and i know my friend, but ive never groomed as extra, like not part of my regular duties, which this would be. and i would be taking time off my regular job (hunters are off for the season and theres only a few in the barn). i was casually offered $50 a day by my friend, who said they could try to make it more, which it would have to be for me to be able to do it. its a professional engagement though i am friends with the trainer, and just wanted to see how off base i was.

LovesHorses
Mar. 25, 2012, 01:57 PM
Our guys are paid $50/day if they have 4 horses ($200) or $60/day if that have 3 horses ($180). Hotel is paid for, food is not. That seems standard. I have paid that all over the West Coast and just did at WEF. We do not tip.

Now these are professional grooms that do this week in and week out. Many will not work for less than that. Managing four horses by yourself can be a lot if you aren't used to the workload, long days, scheduling, etc.

Herbie19
Mar. 25, 2012, 02:21 PM
Our guys are paid $50/day if they have 4 horses ($200) or $60/day if that have 3 horses ($180). Hotel is paid for, food is not. That seems standard. I have paid that all over the West Coast and just did at WEF. We do not tip.

Now these are professional grooms that do this week in and week out. Many will not work for less than that. Managing four horses by yourself can be a lot if you aren't used to the workload, long days, scheduling, etc.

And I bet they're worth their weight in gold. Most of these guys do almost EVERYTHING, including prep and they can probably even braid the GP horses. I "overpay" my guy at home (all he does is turnout, muck, general farm maintenance) because he has WEF type experience.

That being said, $50 a day is very low--expect a minimum of a 12 hour day.

S A McKee
Mar. 25, 2012, 02:27 PM
Keep in mind that the trainer may be charging his/her clients for grooming and you may be paid by the trainer. That's often how it works. The client does not hire a groom directly if they are in a larger trainer program.
In that arrangement you would be paid by the trainer and might expect a direct tip from the client.

As others have noted, make sure you understand what's required. Four horses can be a lot to manage.
They may or may not need a session on the line in .the morning. You may be trudging back and forth between rings quite a distance apart and you may need to hold a horse for long periods of time or even take them back to the barn and untack between rounds or while waiting for a jumpoff

saaskya
Mar. 25, 2012, 02:58 PM
thanks for everyones feedback, i have some idea now what to ask for. i am completely aware of how early and long the days will be and am comfortable juggling horses/ride times, bathing, walking, lunging, etc etc . i didnt have a single day this past winter less than 13 hours, and we were only away twice. so im competent and confident about show grooming. thanks again :)

PonyPenny
Mar. 25, 2012, 10:05 PM
$50.00 to $65.00 per day per horse for grooming for most trainers in So. Ca. You were expected to pay the groom at the end of the show just like you would pay your trainer. Tips were always expected and were split between the grooms. It seems many of the groom sleep at the show. If you are a professional groom I would not except less than the going rate. Check different trainer websites and see what the going rate is in your area. When I groom 30 years ago, I was paid $35.00/day per horse.

Jsalem
Mar. 25, 2012, 10:40 PM
You're getting some interesting replies. Keep in mind: if you're working on a "per horse" basis for individual owners, you may very well be able to bill more. You will be dealing with all of those owners- they have different expectations and quirks. They will be wanting to be the most important part of your day. They will be demanding and difficult.

If you are paid a flat rate working for a trainer, you will only answer to the trainer. The trainer will field the individual concerns of the owner. The trainer will likely have a routine that the owners are expected to accept. In return for this HUGE advantage, the trainer will make money on your services. You will work in relative peace and quiet under the trainer's umbrella.

Just something to think about.....

LovesHorses
Mar. 25, 2012, 10:53 PM
Are things on the East Coast different? We hire the grooms for each show and just have the clients pay them directly. They essentially work for us and don't have four different owners telling them what to do, but we don't profit from them. That is part of the services included in the training/daycare fees.

Alter_nativ3
Mar. 26, 2012, 12:54 AM
$500 a week plus $20 day money (for food), and a hotel room is pretty standard IMHO

Tha Ridge
Mar. 26, 2012, 01:03 AM
Our guys are paid $50/day if they have 4 horses ($200) or $60/day if that have 3 horses ($180). Hotel is paid for, food is not. That seems standard. I have paid that all over the West Coast and just did at WEF. We do not tip.


Why do you not tip? Not flaming, just curious. I've always tipped $25 per day, per horse.

Alter_nativ3
Mar. 26, 2012, 01:16 AM
We will usually tip between $15-25 a day per horse plus a big bonus for an outstanding weekend (Winning classics, champ at a big show etc)

LovesHorses
Mar. 26, 2012, 01:27 AM
The barn I work for never tips. That policy was there when I started. I honestly don't know the reasoning behind it. The clients pay for the hotel rooms and no one complains so who knows!

Tapperjockey
Mar. 26, 2012, 06:16 AM
The barn I work for never tips. That policy was there when I started. I honestly don't know the reasoning behind it. The clients pay for the hotel rooms and no one complains so who knows!

I've never done the tip thing either. I don't understand why. the grooming is XX amount. I pay XX amount, grooms do YY. If they do something extra I would pay additionally for that.

(I also don't understand why many professions seem to rely on tips. Like hair dressers. Why charge XX and expect Y in tips. Just charge me XX+ Y and I will pay that).

comingback
Mar. 26, 2012, 09:32 AM
Keep in mind that the trainer may be charging his/her clients for grooming and you may be paid by the trainer. That's often how it works. The client does not hire a groom directly if they are in a larger trainer program.
In that arrangement you would be paid by the trainer and might expect a direct tip from the client.



This is how it works at our barn. Grooming is included in the client's bill and the trainer pays the groom(s) directly.

Madaketmomma
Mar. 26, 2012, 10:14 AM
I get paid $85 a day plus $25 per person for an office fee because I do all the paperwork for them, and I charge for braiding. I work, on average, 15-18 hours a day. We usually have 2 grooms and my trainer helping out for up to 5 horses. I do bring my horse to the shows and I hop on right before my classes, ride and then hop off and continue to work. I don't get to school in the mornings and basically jump a couple jumps right before I go in the ring because I am too busy working. I do get most of my meals paid for and hotel if we are out of town. Sadly, a lot of the clients are new to showing, so they don't understand about tipping even though I work my butt off for them.

BABYGREENTB
Mar. 26, 2012, 11:29 AM
I would charge no less than $50.00/horse per day plus tip. The usual tip is $15.00 per day. Make sure you get paid immediately after the show ends. Are the clients paying you directly or are you being paid by the trainer?

That is WAY too high. I would think any more than $100/day is going to get you a "thanks, but no thanks" kind of response.

MHM
Mar. 26, 2012, 12:56 PM
Just to add a little perspective, $100/day comes out to $10/hour, if you work a 10 hour day. Which would be a short day by most show standards. :lol: