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Electrikk
Mar. 19, 2012, 10:06 AM
Hi! I need to purchase some sort of front boots for my horse since our ring gets dry and hard. My trainer said something fleece lined so my horse doesn't get rubs. I'm not sure what the type of boot I'm looking for is called, but my trainer said that we could use polos or boots, and since polos are kind of a pain, I'd like to get boots instead. I do hunters and a bit of jumpers, generally jumping around 2"6' and up. I'd prefer to not spend a whole lot, which I know limits me in the fleecey department, but if you know of any other types of linings that won't rub, that would work too.
Thanks!

Linny
Mar. 19, 2012, 10:35 AM
The horse I used to ride went in these: http://www.doversaddlery.com/dover-pro-sport-horse-boots-with-fleece-lining/p/X1-04239/

Several other riders at my barn use them on their horses. They are easy to care for. My only concern is that they are a bit thick and clunky. They make them with a neoprene lining which might be less bulky.

GoForAGallop
Mar. 19, 2012, 10:38 AM
Why would you get boots (besides actual hoof boots) if the ground is hard? :confused:

Electrikk
Mar. 19, 2012, 10:48 AM
Thanks Linny, I'll look into those :)


Why would you get boots (besides actual hoof boots) if the ground is hard? :confused:

For support when we're jumping around a course.

GoForAGallop
Mar. 19, 2012, 10:58 AM
Thanks Linny, I'll look into those :)



For support when we're jumping around a course.

But boots don't provide any support. They provide protection, from hooves/jump poles/etc.

Electrikk
Mar. 19, 2012, 11:02 AM
But boots don't provide any support. They provide protection, from hooves/jump poles/etc.

But what about the boots that I've researched that talk about "tendon support"? Just clarifying, since typing can't really give any tone of voice, I'm not trying to be argumentative or anything, I just want to get this figured out :)

Seal Harbor
Mar. 19, 2012, 11:04 AM
Boots don't support, they protect. Big difference.

They protect the tendons of the font leg from the hind feet and the rails. Open fronts allow the horse to feel the rail if they don't get their legs out of the way fast enough. In case of a bobble the horse will catch the boots with his hind feet instead of the tendons of the front legs.

Fleece takes a great deal of care, it collects dirt and sweat. They need to be kept very clean otherwise you are inviting problems. If it is wet when you are riding they can become a great big soggy mess.

Electrikk
Mar. 19, 2012, 11:09 AM
Boots don't support, they protect. Big difference.

They protect the tendons of the font leg from the hind feet and the rails. Open fronts allow the horse to feel the rail if they don't get their legs out of the way fast enough. In case of a bobble the horse will catch the boots with his hind feet instead of the tendons of the front legs.

Fleece takes a great deal of care, it collects dirt and sweat. They need to be kept very clean otherwise you are inviting problems. If it is wet when you are riding they can become a great big soggy mess.

thanks! What kind of thing can I use then to provide extra support? Are polo wraps my only option?

GoForAGallop
Mar. 19, 2012, 01:00 PM
thanks! What kind of thing can I use then to provide extra support? Are polo wraps my only option?

I'm trying to find the link to the study, but polos provide like 1% more "support" than regular boots, which might as well be nothing.

If you want to keep your boy sound (and he doesn't need boots for actual protection) start doing some research on what sort of exercises you need to be doing to build up his tendon/bone strength. For example, work on pavement, hill work, trail rides, etc. Creating a sure-footed, sound horse will go a lot farther in protecting him than any fabric you wrap around his leg.

toxicity
Mar. 19, 2012, 03:30 PM
I have open front and matching ankle boots with fleece lining that I got really cheap, but I can't seem to find them on SLT or Dover. They must have been on a closeout sale. I use them for medal and jumper classes, not everyday because they are too hard to clean. If I remember, I'll check out the label when I go to the barn tomorrow.

seeuatx
Mar. 19, 2012, 03:38 PM
I have the dover ones shown above in white. They are lovely when new but a complete PITA to keep even remotely clean. That's the downfall to fleece, they carry all that grime with them and I don't bother to use if it is at all wet or muddy out as they will just soak up all that water.

Roma has some fuzzy open fronts on the cheap http://www.horsefroogle.com/Roma-Fleece-Lined-Open-Front-Boot-p/11543.htm

But honestly if you are willing to look beyond fleece, I much prefer the soft neoprene lining on the Woof type boots (Nunn Finer and Roma also make them for less $ than WW).

Electrikk
Mar. 19, 2012, 03:51 PM
Thanks Goforagallop :) I've been planning in doing some hill work wih her, now I have more motivation to do so :)
I've always been spoiled by having nice footing, so now that I'm at a new barn with a harder ring, I haven't been quite sure about the best way to make my horse comfortable. She's been barefoot her whole life and is the soundest horse I know, but I can tell that she gets a bit... fussy about the harder ground. Not lame, just obviously doesn't like it.

STA
Mar. 19, 2012, 05:20 PM
Go to a local consignment shop. You have a good chance of finding a large slection at great prices and already "broken in".

kmwines01
Mar. 19, 2012, 05:38 PM
http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots/easyboot_glove/Easyboot_glove.aspx

If it's more a foot sore type thing you could try this type of thing. The horse I'm leasing is barefoot right now and she was a bit tender when we first pulled them off. And we haven't had any rain lately so the ring is a bit dry and rocky so they're really nice to have if she's bit touchy. And she absolutely loves wearing them! I would've thought she would hate them but she feels so much different and better when we put them on. And they have heel protection if you have a horse that clips themselves.

Also try:
http://www.smartpakequine.com/magic-cushion-hoof-packing-7151p.aspx?cm_vc=Search

Easy to pack and will help with foot soreness.

might be more of feet ouchiness than a wrap issue if she's barefoot and isnt used to more concussion

mojo7777
Mar. 19, 2012, 05:57 PM
I like the Roma open front gel boots. They are reasonably priced, clean up easily, look fine and do the job. They are also holding up well. Recomended!

alto
Mar. 19, 2012, 07:10 PM
I'm at a new barn with a harder ring, I haven't been quite sure about the best way to make my horse comfortable. She's been barefoot her whole life and is the soundest horse I know, but I can tell that she gets a bit... fussy about the harder ground. Not lame, just obviously doesn't like it.

Shoes - by the time you do the boots, they will cost as much if not more, & if your horse is hard on them, you will replace them almost as often :(

Her feet may toughen up, or may end up bruised, maybe discuss this with your farrier.

Rel6
Mar. 19, 2012, 08:52 PM
Go to a local consignment shop. You have a good chance of finding a large slection at great prices and already "broken in".

Sorry to hijack, but does anyone know how to locate a consignment tack store near you? I'm near Rochester and not going home anytime soon. Couldn't find anything by googling.

KitKat987
Mar. 19, 2012, 11:04 PM
If it is the concussion of hard ground you are worried about, definitely put shoes on! Your horse will thank you for it. No tendon boot is going to make a lick of difference where that's concerned.

toxicity
Mar. 20, 2012, 02:30 PM
Looked at the brand of mine today, they are Pro Craft. Can't seem to find them by Googling though.

STA
Mar. 20, 2012, 06:01 PM
Sorry to hijack, but does anyone know how to locate a consignment tack store near you? I'm near Rochester and not going home anytime soon. Couldn't find anything by googling.

My shop is a long way from Rochester, but UPS is a wonderful company.