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View Full Version : I think I found an easier way to empty water troughs



mkevent
Mar. 16, 2012, 12:39 PM
I'm not sure if anyone else has posted this before, but I think I've found an easier way to empty 100 gallon water troughs for cleaning.

Since I'm getting older, trying to tip over those 100 gallon Rubbermaid water troughs was getting to be a hassle. I know they come with the drain plugs in the bottom, but those became annoying to constantly screw in and screw out whenever I cleaned the trough.

I went to Lowe's and found two items that I screwed into the drain plug hole instead:
1 1/4 X 2" galvanized steel pipe nipple (yeah, that's what it's called)
1 1/4 " PVC ball valve (threaded)


First, screw in the steel pipe into the drain plug hole and then screw the ball valve onto the pipe. The ball valve has a handle that allows you to just turn the handle to empty the trough. Easy peasy!

I just converted all my troughs yesterday, so I'm not sure yet if they will leak a little but I'm sure I can fix that with something if it becomes a problem.

Just thought I'd share my discovery!

HPFarmette
Mar. 16, 2012, 12:41 PM
Very clever. I admire anyone who finds easier ways to do stuff.

Mali
Mar. 16, 2012, 07:48 PM
If you discover leaks, just pick up a roll of teflon thread tape and you'll be good to go :D

goodhors
Mar. 16, 2012, 08:28 PM
I have been using a piece of hose and making it siphon the water out. I also don't like fighting with the bucket or endeavoring to tip over a heavy tank.

Hose siphon works pretty quick for me. Good science lesson with the kids got me started doing this, and they enjoyed "playing in the water" for a reason. Kind of fun to see if you can make the siphon go on the first try.

UrbanHennery
Mar. 16, 2012, 10:30 PM
I use a hose siphon too - the hens always come over to frolic in the big puddle the process makes in the grass. Sometimes if I'm really lucky Mike will have the pump in the back of his work truck - that thing empties the tank in under 3 minutes. :)

nashfad
Mar. 16, 2012, 10:35 PM
Wow, thanks for the idea!!!!!!!!!!

Nancy!
Mar. 16, 2012, 10:40 PM
What a great idea! Thanks for sharing.

Nancy!

fourmares
Mar. 17, 2012, 02:09 AM
I take the hose, put the end in the tank, turn it on and count to ten. Then I turn it off and undo the end from the spigot and lay it where I want the water to go... but the valve sounds like an easier way to go. I recommend several wraps of plumbers tape (teflon tape) on the threads.

LookmaNohands
Mar. 17, 2012, 07:01 AM
My 17 hand TB is really good at emptying water troughs!

He sticks his head halfway in, splashes around then puts one foot in and starts pawing. Water goes everywhere. Even though I secure the troughs to the fence with baling twine, he sometimes plays so hard he tips it over anyway. :lol:

I am still trying to get it on tape!:D

Maybe I should rent him out to people to empty their troughs.

ayrabz
Mar. 17, 2012, 08:14 AM
sounds very wise!
I may? see if I can use this type of idea----I had started a thread awhile back, asking if anyone has ever adapted a 'utility' sink as a turnout water idea...simply because, I want to water inside the run in, and don't want to 'dump' drain it there...and, with only 1-2 horses, the big size wouldn't be necessary.

I was thinking utility sink type since I could undo the drain, and place a bucket under it (or pipe/hose connect the drain to disperse somewhere outside the run in)

your idea may allow that as well if I elevate it some....

Chall
Mar. 17, 2012, 08:30 AM
Can you post a picture, or a link to a picture demonstrating this? I googled the parts but don't understand the dynamics.
Is the pipe very short, so you put your hand under water to open/close it?

mkevent
Mar. 17, 2012, 10:25 AM
Thanks for the suggestions of the teflon tape! I will go back and tape the threads the next time I clean the troughs. It is leaking a very miniscule amount but why not fix it so it doesn't leak at all?

Chall, I'll try to add some pics to my website. I'm not technologically advanced enough for Facebook!

Basically, after removing the old plug and emptying the trough, I thread the short pipe in the hole from the outside of the trough. Before you thread it into the hole, add a few layers of teflon tape around the threads of the pipe to make the connection watertight. (Anyone with experience with telfon tape, feel free to chime in as I haven't tried this yet!)
The pipe has threads on both ends, so you need to wrap the teflon tape around both threaded ends. Now you have a water trough with a little short piece of pipe sticking out of where the originally drain plug used to be.

Next, you thread the ball valve piece to the end of the pipe sticking out from the outside of the trough. This allows you to simply turn the handle and release the water from the trough all from the outside.

I will say the ball valve handles are a bit tough to move until they loosen up!

It is also easier when assembling this to do it with the trough sitting on its side-especially for threading the ball valve to the pipe.

Hope that makes sense. If not, feel free to call or PM me.

I'm actually thinking of doing "how to" photos of this and little things like the jumps I built and compost boxes to my website because "a picture is worth a thousand words". It would be a great way for all the Coth "do it yourselfers" to share info!

Of course, I was also planning to write a book and that hasn't happened either!

trubandloki
Mar. 17, 2012, 11:58 AM
To add to your great post. You do not have to buy a PVC ball valve. They come in metal too. I have found the metal to be more forgiving.

I position my trough so that I can turn the handle the quarter turn to open the valve thru the no climb fencing.

If you are not the handy type just ask at any of those home improvement stores. They will be able to help you buy the right pieces.

Bacardi1
Mar. 17, 2012, 04:32 PM
I've learned never to mess with those idiot drain plugs in Rubbermaid troughs. Just seems to create problems that weren't there in the first place.

I ain't no spring chicken, & have handicaps to boot, but have never had any problems tipping my troughs.

I have both a 150 & 100 in my field of 4 horses. Keep them clean & fresh always by interchangeably flushing one & allowing a 2nd one to drop down to 1/2 to 1/3 full. Extremely easy to then tip, rinse/scrub/disinfect/flush, & refill. Am able to do this even on crutches. And horses always have clean, fresh water with no need to add piping or fiddle with the drain.

chicamux
Mar. 17, 2012, 05:52 PM
OOH, OOH,I have another easy way to drain a tank and have the water puddle end up further away from the trough. I used to do the hose end in the tank and suck on the other end to get a siphon action going. Yuck! I also noticed that a hose already full of water could be used to start a siphon going but that meant that I had to fart around with one of my hoses being taken off the horse reel and stretched out. BUT that idea led me to another idea!

I had an old hose that was falling apart at one end. I simply cut about a 15' section of old hose, didn't need connectors at either end, just a chunk of hose. I take one end and put it into the trough of water and keep feeding more hose into the water so it sits under the water in loops. By feeding it in like this the hose fills with water while the air moves out of the hose towards the end that is still out of the water. Ina few seconds you have the piece of hose in the trough and is is full of water. Then pinch one end or kink it by bending it and take that end out of the trough and set it on the ground 10' away from the trough and slightly lower than the trough. Release the kink in the hose end and watch the water flow. The siphon will begin the water flow and the trough will empty. All it takes is a piece of hose, not tooo short.

chicamux

hosspuller
Mar. 17, 2012, 11:25 PM
I'm not sure if anyone else has posted this before, but I think I've found an easier way to empty 100 gallon water troughs for cleaning.

Since I'm getting older, trying to tip over those 100 gallon Rubbermaid water troughs was getting to be a hassle. I know they come with the drain plugs in the bottom, but those became annoying to constantly screw in and screw out whenever I cleaned the trough.

I went to Lowe's and found two items that I screwed into the drain plug hole instead:
1 1/4 X 2" galvanized steel pipe nipple (yeah, that's what it's called)
1 1/4 " PVC ball valve (threaded)




To make it a bit easier to turn, use a smaller valve. 1/2 or 3/4 inch valve is less costly too.

materials for 3/4 valve:
3/4" x 2" pipe reducing bushing
3/4 pipe close nipple
3/4 pipe ball valve

(pipe or NPT means threaded)

Hinderella
Mar. 19, 2012, 02:19 PM
Great ideas! Where I board my horse, there is always mud in the paddocks where the water tanks are dumped. I'm going to test out the pipe & valve routine for my own pony's paddock, but I'll pass along the simple hose suggestion for the barn staff to try on all the other paddocks. Just being able to direct the draining water out of the paddocks will be a huge benefit.

MKevent, maybe you can make a short video & put it on youtube. I find all sorts of helpful videos there!

ChocoMare
Mar. 19, 2012, 03:12 PM
I, like the OP, did plumbing too:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/296375_2257023780076_1082814537_32042836_120290147 _n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/318695_2257024220087_1082814537_32042837_319459599 _n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/308281_2257024460093_1082814537_32042838_160716318 2_n.jpg

And so that opening the valve doesn't leave a big puddle near where my mare stands for her hay, I bought 3 LONG sections of electrical conduit that I just connect when I need to drain it.

:D