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melmda
Mar. 16, 2012, 09:31 AM
I recently switched my horse from a regular D-snaffle to a french link. I was using my trainers since we were trying different bits to see what suited her best. The french link is the Herm Springer Aurigan metal. She loves it. I was wondering about opinions if the the type of metal makes a difference? I have seen all copper and just the link in the middle copper. I have also seen just stainless steele and the all aurigan. I would like to get have one just like the one I am barrowing but a $145 bit is not currently in my budget. Any ideas on if the metal matters? If so which one is best? Any lower cost bits with Aurigan? Thanks!

skittlespony
Mar. 16, 2012, 09:40 AM
This has absolutly nothing to do with the type of metal and the cost but you can put falvor strips on your horses bit! :)

BarbB
Mar. 16, 2012, 09:42 AM
I think the taste of the metal does matter to some horses.
According to Wikipedia: 'Aurigan is a patented, nickel-free alloy made of copper, silicon, and zinc. It is used on high quality bits for horses to encourage increased salivation...'
This is an HS product.
But I have found bits that are nickel free and combine copper and steel as an alloy, not bits of copper, that work as well as a HS bit.
I like HS but they are expensive and the only bits of theirs that I have are those that are not available anywhere else.

lachevaline
Mar. 16, 2012, 12:30 PM
I've used aurigan before and I noticed a fairly significant increase in salivation, so I think horses do tend to like it (at least, in my experience, which is limited). But HS bits are RIDICULOUSLY expensive.

GingerJumper
Mar. 16, 2012, 01:18 PM
IMO, more salivation with aurigan has more to do with the acidity levels of the copper in the metal blend causing excess salivation than the horse actually liking it, or at least that's what I've been told. That said, my horse goes in a western bit with a sweet iron french link mouthpiece that has copper rings on the middle link.

melmda
Mar. 16, 2012, 02:26 PM
So in my not working and distracting myself I looked at the mikmar copper roller french link d ring snaffle. Any opinions or comparisons to the others?

lachevaline
Mar. 20, 2012, 03:04 AM
GJ, interesting! I hadn't heard that but it makes sense.

EAY
Mar. 20, 2012, 08:09 AM
You might be able to find an HS bit on eBay. I've also seen them for sales in ads on this BB.

GingerJumper
Mar. 20, 2012, 08:28 AM
GJ, interesting! I hadn't heard that but it makes sense.

After I heard it, it made sense to me too. I immediately remembered a walking horse I worked with who had a tense jaw but who was super drooly. The mouthpiece on her bit was solid copper (a bit more typical in the twh world). I actually stuck a copper bit in my mouth once, just to see... it even made me drool. Yuck.

RAyers
Mar. 20, 2012, 08:39 AM
After I heard it, it made sense to me too. I immediately remembered a walking horse I worked with who had a tense jaw but who was super drooly. The mouthpiece on her bit was solid copper (a bit more typical in the twh world). I actually stuck a copper bit in my mouth once, just to see... it even made me drool. Yuck.

Copper has no "acidity." It has no associated hydrogen and can not dissociate the water in saliva (as compared to aluminum). The "taste" you sensed is an electric current induced by a galvanic response in the copper. You can get the same effect with an old penny in your mouth.

These bits basically set up the equivalent of a battery in the mouth with the saliva as the electrolyte.

Most bits that elicit a salivary response have a copper or other conductive alloy to stimulate salivation.

GingerJumper
Mar. 20, 2012, 09:00 AM
Copper has no "acidity." It has no associated hydrogen and can not dissociate the water in saliva (as compared to aluminum). The "taste" you sensed is an electric current induced by a galvanic response in the copper. You can get the same effect with an old penny in your mouth.

These bits basically set up the equivalent of a battery in the mouth with the saliva as the electrolyte.

Most bits that elicit a salivary response have a copper or other conductive alloy to stimulate salivation.

Whoa. That's some science! I had no idea.

lachevaline
Mar. 20, 2012, 04:35 PM
I hope I'm not the only one with a penny in her mouth right now.

KIDDING.



Or am I?