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ALTERthepress
Mar. 15, 2012, 09:58 PM
So, being the nice ammie that I am, I jumped my horse that I have had for a year relatively high for the first time. And was completely jumped out of the tack! :lol: I was not expecting that from my safe-yet-not-super-stylish jumper. I guess he just doesn't really try at the lower heights. Anyways, just in general I have lots of problems on the downside of the jumps. I sit down too early and take my hands away from his neck before I really should. Is there any way to think about this or exercises to do that would help me get an idea of what i should ideally be doing o the backside or is it just practice?

CBoylen
Mar. 15, 2012, 10:13 PM
Practice holding the mane and holding your release over the jump and a landing rail, so you can keep that feeling of how long to stay over. You can train your muscles to help hold you down. And look up, it helps you to retain your balance.

joiedevie99
Mar. 15, 2012, 10:25 PM
Start by learning how to stay out of his way. Start with a single or an easy line. As soon as you are straight to the fence, get in jumping position. Grab mane and stay there on approach, jump, and landing. Hold your position for at least five strides after the fence. As you get comfortable staying out of the horse's way, you can focus on folding your hips to stay with the horse over the fence. With some practice, the landing side of the fence should come naturally.

Ponyclubrocks
Mar. 16, 2012, 11:15 AM
You don't mention having a trainer, that would be my best recommendation. Good luck to you!

sirensong4
Mar. 16, 2012, 11:35 AM
I just went and looked for my favorite hands-down exercise from a back issue of Practical Horseman and i can't find it online so i'll try to sketch it out:

________________________ rail

9'


===================== jump

9'


________________________ rail

9'



===================== jump

9'


________________________ rail

Basically, 18' between ground rails and 18' between the jumps. Set this up pretty small (2'6 to 3') and canter in. Let the horse pick the distance to the first rail and focus on keeping your hands down and forward until you are across the last rail. You can add as many additional jumps to this as you like. The Prac Horseman article called for two 1-strides, 3 fences in all, but my indoor isn't big enough. :(
This is also a good exercise for making you let go and let the horse do his job, rather than staring at the first fence, trying to see a distance (which is MY major form fault). :cool:
I'm sure there are other good exercises out there that others will suggest.

ALTERthepress
Mar. 16, 2012, 03:31 PM
I do have a trainer! :) Just looking for some supplemental exercises/opinions as I won't have a lesson for the next two weeks.

Thanks for the input!