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Trevelyan96
Mar. 13, 2012, 06:27 PM
I have about 1/3 acre on the back of my property that is wooded and overgrown with underbrush and deadfall. Due to the elevation, it will never be suitable for turnout/pasture, but I would like to clean up the deadfall and underbrush and turn it into a small cross country course. It also backs up to a small trail, which is another reason I want the area cleaned up so that I can access the trail without going on the road.

DH and I are arguing about the best way to accomplish this, as its really over-run with deadfall, briars, and weeds. I think we should rent a wood chipper and just spend a weekend feeding it with any of the deadfall that will fit and use the bigger logs as small jumps. He wants to do it the 'hard' way by loading it all up in the pickup and hauling to the landfill, where they use yard waste to make free mulch for the county. My issue with this is that it will require so many trips to the landfill that we'll never actually finish it. (I think that's actually his strategy... he doesn't want to deal with it so he insists on doing it the hard way... which gives him an excuse not to start.)

I also want to buy a bush-hog for our tractor to knock down the bigger weeds and brush, but he says it will leave 'spikes' coming out of the ground. Once we've got it cleaned up, I can maintain it with the bush hog, but is he right about the 'spikes' from the brush? If so, what's the best way to eliminate the undergrowth and maintain it?

So here are the before & after photos. This is after 4 days in the 1st 1/2-3/4 acre section.

Before:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747117752
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747115762/in/photostream/
After:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7781800720/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7781804368/in/photostream/

tangledweb
Mar. 13, 2012, 06:56 PM
Is dragging the bigger logs out to a clear area and burning them an option?

To be honest, even your easy way sounds pretty hard to me. Freeing interlocked fallen trees from vines and brambles and cutting them into movable sizes either to lift into a chipper or a pickup is pretty tough work.

A bushhog would be a pretty good start if you can get it in there. For the types of things it can get through, most will not leave problematic stumps, but you'd want to go through on foot cleaning up a trail anyway and see what there is.

Trevelyan96
Mar. 13, 2012, 07:08 PM
The bigger logs can stay put... I'll use them for small trail jumps. Chipping or hauling the deadfall is definitely hard work, but it has to be done before we can even think about bringing in a brush hog. We had it pretty cleaned up a few years ago, then came the hurricane and blizzards, and it looks like we never touched it. :(

ReSomething
Mar. 13, 2012, 07:38 PM
I try to leave ours alone for habitat mostly.

We do have trails cut through it and anytime you bushhog a sapling it shatters the trunk, which does leave spikes. Any woody plant you cut off leaves a stump, be it half an inch in diameter or two feet. You can go back and dig down a tad and cut them off sub surface but it's labor intensive. We drag what deadfall is in the way off to the side and can either use it for jumps or use it to encourage the deer to use the trailways for better hunting.

Trevelyan96
Mar. 13, 2012, 07:44 PM
I try to leave ours alone for habitat mostly.

We do have trails cut through it and anytime you bushhog a sapling it shatters the trunk, which does leave spikes. Any woody plant you cut off leaves a stump, be it half an inch in diameter or two feet. You can go back and dig down a tad and cut them off sub surface but it's labor intensive. We drag what deadfall is in the way off to the side and can either use it for jumps or use it to encourage the deer to use the trailways for better hunting.

Good idea RS. Maybe I'll use the landscape rake to drag the deadfall into a neat pile off to the side and just bushog down the weedy undergrowth. Thanks

WildBlue
Mar. 14, 2012, 08:54 AM
Yes, you'll also have spikes for a while if you mow down big weeds, brambles, etc. From personal experience, you don't want to get lawn-darted on land that's been rough mown. Think road rash + splinters.

"A while" is on the order of a couple years, until the stubs decompose, and you definitely need to keep it mowed during that time to keep the brambles and whatnot from growing right back. Eventually, mowing short enough ofetn enough will kill them.

katyb
Mar. 14, 2012, 09:50 AM
We have been clearing out a similar area. We have a lot of dead pine trees down, as well as tons of smaller stuff. We've used a chainsaw, tractor, and 12-year-old boys, and it is going well. We have burned the stuff that is dead and rotting, but that might not be feasible where you are. I'll tell you that we did probably 12 tractor bucket loads and 8 pick-up truck loads, and that was only about 1/12 acre. Back and forth to the landfill would be a serious pain!

SmartAlex
Mar. 14, 2012, 10:16 AM
The spikes would be my concern as well, for landing on and galloping on. You might be better off pulling anything you possibly can with a tractor and chain. Your typical multiflora rose bush can generally be uprooted that way avoiding leaving the spikes AND the root system for regrowth.

What we did with our overgrown area:
Our neighbor had a brush hog that needed some serious rework so beating it to death was not going to hurt anyone's feelings. He cleared some serious brush and thorn apple trees just by backing into with the brush hog. When he was done, the deck of the hog was completely obiliterated and had to be replaced, but it was almost at the point anyway.

My husband then used his tractor loader and back blade to scrape all the woody shrapnel left over from the chopping into a large pile, and three years later we have some lovely compost. All deadfall was laboriously loaded into a trailer and piled for burning. The ash was added to the "mulch" pile.

NancyM
Mar. 14, 2012, 11:33 AM
This is a small area to clean up by hand. Will take as long as it takes. And I understrand about hubbies that don't want to help. Don't pay any attention to that, a small female human bulldozer working alone works just fine. If you want it cleared and cleaned up, just start, and work your way through it. It is quite satisying work, actually.

To avoid the stumps from small bushes and young trees, cut by hand with cutting shears, right at ground level. Get some good gloves. Pile and burn. Anything too big to be cut like this, requires a chainsaw, and an operator for such a beast. But you will be surprised just what you can drag/haul out and pile.

I have about 30 acres of this, and have been at it for 4 years. Once you can get it clear enough for the horses to get in there, the traffic will help to keep it clear of some of it growing back.

The cost of a bush hog for such a small area would not be worth it IMO. Tractors also do not do well on sloped areas, they can tip over. The area once cleared may not be "pasture", but if the horses can get in there, they may well make use of it.

draftdriver
Mar. 14, 2012, 12:33 PM
Only 1/3 of an acre? That's a tiny area. Just clear what you want for a jumping trail and leave the rest to nature. The nutrients will return to the soil and feed the remaining trees. De-limb anything you cut down, and pile the limbs in a few heaps to encourage wildlife.

Cleaning out everything will damage the soil biota which live in symbiosis with the tree roots. The soil moisture balance will suffer. Also, 'nature hates a vacuum'. Weeds will grow in open or bare places, given any opportunity.

emaren
Mar. 14, 2012, 01:18 PM
I had to clean up about an acre of tree tops from a clear cut by hand. I left the stumps as that is very expensive to remove. Luckily I did this before there was much grass growth and during the winter so I didn't have too much risk of starting a forest fire. I just methodically went out whenever I had a free hour and made piles and piles of tree tops. When the pile got too big or it was too far to drag more wood to the pile I burned it. It was terrifying. I had 30-40 ft bonfires and was ready to dial the fire department at all times. However, I now have a one-acre pasture, the horses do fine around the stumps. The downside is that after planting grass there was also an influx of dogweed so this spring I am back at it pulling dogweed, it's like having to reclear the place. But come April the horses will have an hour a day to graze and my hay bill will go down. So worth all the manual labor.

For your situation, I would just get out there and start making piles where a chipper can be pulled in. If you want to be able to do it all in one weekend, make the piles beforehand. Then just ask hubbie to help with that part, usually they like working with machinery/tools just not the other labor that goes with it, lol. Once you are out there doing it he will probably feel obligated to help at the end. Most of the wood chips should decompose pretty quick except for anything hardwood, so keep that in mind when making your piles. I used to ride at a barn that used wood chips as footing in areas so that might be an option as well.

lv4running
Mar. 14, 2012, 04:00 PM
Can you file for a controlled burn permit? If so, that is a great way to rid yourself of the thick underbrush w/o a huge expense.

CFFarm
Mar. 16, 2012, 01:34 PM
This is a small area to clean up by hand. Will take as long as it takes. And I understrand about hubbies that don't want to help. Don't pay any attention to that, a small female human bulldozer working alone works just fine. If you want it cleared and cleaned up, just start, and work your way through it. It is quite satisying work, actually.

To avoid the stumps from small bushes and young trees, cut by hand with cutting shears, right at ground level. Get some good gloves. Pile and burn. Anything too big to be cut like this, requires a chainsaw, and an operator for such a beast. But you will be surprised just what you can drag/haul out and pile.

I have about 30 acres of this, and have been at it for 4 years. Once you can get it clear enough for the horses to get in there, the traffic will help to keep it clear of some of it growing back.

The cost of a bush hog for such a small area would not be worth it IMO. Tractors also do not do well on sloped areas, they can tip over. The area once cleared may not be "pasture", but if the horses can get in there, they may well make use of it.

I'm with Nancy. I actually enjoy this kind of work. And if you can turn goats or ponies out there, they can do a great job of keeping things back.

Nes
Mar. 16, 2012, 01:55 PM
Goats.


Then Pigs.

Trevelyan96
Aug. 10, 2012, 01:46 PM
The poison ivy is so bad down there that we decided on the Rent-A-Goat route for starters to knock back the undergrowth. They delivered 30 of them yesterday mornng. So cute. I wonder if they'd miss 1 or 2 at the end of the job if I hide them and keep them.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747126984/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747125238
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747123488/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747121820/in/photostream/

Back 40 before:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747120084/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76077084@N02/7747115762/in/photostream/

Its amazing how much they ate down just in 1 day. Will take after pics next week. Once they've knocked back the majority of the growth, we'll be down there cutting up the bigger fallen trees and use the tractor with landscape rake to pile up the rest of the deadfall. The derecho brought down 4 really big trees, so I'm going to have plenty of logs for jumps!

oliverreed
Aug. 10, 2012, 01:54 PM
I had similar luck with two rented sheep. AND bonus they were both girls and one had had twin kids about a month before I got them! Everyone I worked with thought I was nuts - you rented WHAT?!? For WHAT?!?

Guin
Aug. 10, 2012, 01:56 PM
Rent-a-goat! LOL! Great idea. :lol::lol::lol:

TheJenners
Aug. 10, 2012, 02:24 PM
A town on my island just used goats to clear an area in their city park. They work!

Trevelyan96
Aug. 10, 2012, 02:38 PM
They are so neat! Just as tame and friendly as can be. It took the horses 4 hours to get anywhere near the fence, but eventually Inky decided that they are kind of neat, he keep putting his head over to make friends.

The problem is that they are so cool, that I keep going back there, and they all come running and stop doing their job, LOL! Last night, as I was putting hay out for the horses, they all started talking to me, so of course, I just HAD to give them some hay too.

And they absolutely adore my neighbor for some reason.

AirForceWife
Aug. 10, 2012, 02:48 PM
The Air Force rents goats for land maintenance...or at least did at one point. Some base up north can't remember which one though. I can only imagine writing the contract for that.

RedmondDressage
Aug. 10, 2012, 03:12 PM
Wow, the area looks exactly like an area I'm wanting to clean up and fence for more pasture.... I can't wait to see after photos cuz I've been thinking about going the goat route as well!

wsmoak
Aug. 10, 2012, 03:24 PM
Did the rent-a-goats come with a temporary fence, or did you have to fence it off first?

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 10, 2012, 03:46 PM
Oh yes, do get some updated pics please and also pics of the fencing setup.

And then send the goats to me.

analise
Aug. 10, 2012, 04:13 PM
Man, now I want to see if my BO would let me borrow a goat or two for the afternoon to mow down my little tiny backyard so I don't have to! My dog would probably lose her mind, LOL.

Trevelyan96
Aug. 10, 2012, 06:26 PM
Did the rent-a-goats come with a temporary fence, or did you have to fence it off first?

The goat owners came in and setup a temporary fence with t posts and panels! I think that was the bulk of the cost. They fenced in about 1/2 acre and once that is eaten down, they'll move the fencing to take care of rest (about another 1/4 acre I think.)

Basically, they charged me 1K for a complete clearing of the undergrowth with as many goats as needed for as long as it takes them to do the job. They come out to check on the goats daily, give them their water, etc., so I think the cost is pretty reasonable. They're also working with the MD state Ag dept., so they're taking measurements of the growth and before/after pictures for research. Very professional.

Epona142
Aug. 10, 2012, 06:57 PM
Good on you!! Natural land clearing + fertilizer. Love it!

They sound like an excellent company, too :)

wsmoak
Aug. 10, 2012, 09:10 PM
Man, now I want to see if my BO would let me borrow a goat or two for the afternoon to mow down my little tiny backyard so I don't have to! My dog would probably lose her mind, LOL.

You'd probably want to look into sheep for that. Goats are more interested in browsing at about shoulder height, so you're more likely to lose your landscaping shrubs than your lawn!

I remember reading an article about someone with a sheep-and-goat lawn service in Atlanta, maybe: http://eweniversallygreen.com/home .

analise
Aug. 10, 2012, 10:06 PM
You'd probably want to look into sheep for that. Goats are more interested in browsing at about shoulder height, so you're more likely to lose your landscaping shrubs than your lawn!

I remember reading an article about someone with a sheep-and-goat lawn service in Atlanta, maybe: http://eweniversallygreen.com/home .

Luckily, I don't have any shrubs, just grass and weeds. :)

cowboymom
Aug. 11, 2012, 12:14 PM
:eek: 1K??

I need to hire out my goats!

SAcres
Aug. 11, 2012, 04:49 PM
There is a huge field next to my property that has tons of underbrush and bushes. If I can ever figure out who the owner is and lease it, I might have to contact all my 4h buddies for a favor. :lol:

Trevelyan96
Aug. 11, 2012, 07:50 PM
:eek: 1K??

I need to hire out my goats!

Do it!!!! Keep in mind, that they provided all of the fencing, spend 3 days setting it up in shoulder deep poison ivy and briars, and they come out daily to check on the progress & take care of the goats. The job also includes moving the fence to the next 1/2 ac. section when the first one is cleaned up.

The last person we hired to clean up back there charged us $1,500, spent 2 days back there, then left and never finished the job. I'm much happier putting the 1k back into my local farmer's pocket.

cowboymom
Aug. 12, 2012, 12:39 PM
We do all that for free just to be happy that we don't have to buy feed for the horses/cows/goats! :D

magicteetango
Aug. 12, 2012, 01:38 PM
I am dieing to do something like this for about a five or six acre section which is down in a valley. I wanted goats but I was too worried about them escaping and eating the Volvo (he may love that car as much as I love my mare...) and my FIL said to put cows down there. It is not as heavily wooded or as much under brush as you have (YEARS of bush hogging) but I want something to eat down the weeds for me before I fence it for my horses. I will have to see if they do something like this in my area!

Trevelyan96
Aug. 12, 2012, 10:40 PM
Its been an eventful weekend. As they've eaten down almost all of their fenced in area, things have certainly gotten interesting. I'm glad I've read so much on here about goats! Here's a rundown.

Yesterday was minor. One goat decided she really liked getting her head stuck in the fence. 6 times in 2 days.

Went out to feed the horses this morning, and the gate between their pasture and the goats was wide open. :eek:Amazingly, all the goats were still where they belonged, down in one corner of the woods. Horses were up by the barn but there was clear evidence that they'd been down in the wood 'visiting'. I'm sure I sprouted several new gray hairs when I saw that open gate and couldn't see the goats until I got down to the fence. Owners came out this morning and said they'll probably move the fencing tomorrow or Tuesday.

Then, around 5:30 I go out the throw the horses some hay - goats are all yelling down in the woods - and I notice a bunch of them are on the WRONG side of the fence. :eek: :eek: Total 3 ring circus trying to round them up and get them back where they belong, a few of them made the mistake of going into the horse's paddock and Inky literally tried to kill them. :mad: Get everyone safely back where they belong, reinforce fence, call goat owners to let them know what's up and reassure them all goats are accounted for and safe. (where's the sweating bullets icon?)

Owners come back out, say yup, they've run out of fun things to eat and are ready to start getting into trouble, so we decide to drop a few small trees to keep them occuped. Owner's husband, 3 teenage boys and Mr. Trevelyan playing Paul Bunyon while Cindy and I just shook our head and enjoyed the spectacle of boys and men being boys. I sure was missing my video camera!

Dumb and dumber are locked in their stalls tonight just to be on the safe side.

katarine
Aug. 12, 2012, 10:58 PM
lol welcome to goats :)

MistyBlue
Aug. 12, 2012, 11:33 PM
Busy goats = awww, cute! :D

Bored goats = ACK! RUN! :eek:


:winkgrin: :lol:

Epona142
Aug. 13, 2012, 01:00 AM
Yup, that's how it works! Unless their little mouths are occupied, they find their way into trouble. LOL!

cowboymom
Aug. 13, 2012, 12:01 PM
Busy goats = awww, cute! :D

Bored goats = ACK! RUN! :eek:


:winkgrin: :lol:

:lol: :yes: :lol:

aspenlucas
Aug. 13, 2012, 01:29 PM
We have a herd of 22 dairy goats (no horns). We have ours trained to TWO strands of premier rope fence. Bottom wire is about 1 foot and top 2 feet. Never had a goat out. :) This would make it VERY easy to have them clear brush!

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 13, 2012, 03:52 PM
We have a herd of 22 dairy goats (no horns). We have ours trained to TWO strands of premier rope fence. Bottom wire is about 1 foot and top 2 feet. Never had a goat out. :) This would make it VERY easy to have them clear brush!

Are dairy goats easier or are yours just unique?

Guin
Aug. 13, 2012, 04:31 PM
I am loving these goaty adventures! :D

QacarXan
Aug. 13, 2012, 06:31 PM
I'm gonna be meeting with a rancher friend who has 120 goats in the next week or two, if anyone has a question a google search can't resolve :-)

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 13, 2012, 06:35 PM
I am loving these goaty adventures! :D

Me too!

I still think I need some goats...

And a donkey

And some chickens (but maybe just a few hens)

Epona142
Aug. 13, 2012, 07:38 PM
I have four strand hot wire run on the biggest charger you can buy and 95% of my goats stay in.

There are two we call the jailbreakers who have learned to jump between the wires. I need to add one more wire but since they don't really go anywhere, I haven't bothered.

PeteyPie
Aug. 14, 2012, 02:46 PM
I am loving these goaty adventures! :D

Me too. Can't wait for the After photos.

ToiRider
Aug. 14, 2012, 03:16 PM
I bought a goat farm and converted it to a horse farm. The seller told me his goats never got out (many stranded high tensile electric). My neighbor tells a different story. The goats were out and in his yard. When they would hear the Seller's car coming, they would hop back into the pasture and present themselves for feeding time. I have stayed away from goats and have one mischievous mini-donkey who likes to eat weeds.

Oberon13
Aug. 14, 2012, 03:17 PM
Whoa! The before and after photos posted in post #1 are amazing!

You go, goats! ;)

ToiRider
Aug. 14, 2012, 03:22 PM
The before and after pictures are truly astonishing!

Guin
Aug. 14, 2012, 04:56 PM
It's like you're taking pictures of a different place. That is truly amazing. Good goats!

horseshrink
Aug. 14, 2012, 05:22 PM
Those pix are amazing!!! I have been trying to clear an area for over a year now and have made practically NO progress.

I'm located in central Texas and looking for someone to rent me some goats for the short term clearing.

PeteyPie
Aug. 14, 2012, 07:08 PM
Whoa! The before and after photos posted in post #1 are amazing!

You go, goats! ;)

Thanks for saying this! I didn't know the photos were in Post #1.

It is amazing.

One thing I am wondering: I take it that goats can eat poison ivy without harm, since the OP said there was a lot of poison ivy on the lot and NOTHING is left. So, do people have to take care about touching the goats if they have been around the poison ivy? I would think the oils would get on their bodies, or beards and mouths, at least.

Appsolute
Aug. 14, 2012, 07:14 PM
^^^

YES – There is some poison oak in my horse’s pasture… and I keep getting poison oak from grooming / touching her! I am battling some poison oak on my EAR right now, not too fun.

There is a lot of poison oak around my house as well, I have to be careful touching the dog after he has been running in it, as it can transfer to my hands.. and then any where I touch on my skin!

hundredacres
Aug. 14, 2012, 07:25 PM
They did a really good job! I have one goat but he won't eat just anything - I can't imagine him doing any good at all as he thinks he's a horse and is finicky. We're going to start clearing trails on a 11 acre wood this fall but we aren't clearing it, just creating trails and will also add a few jumps where there are some large fallen tree's. My husbands made many trails through our woods ver the years we've never has spikes because he follows/uses the path of least resistance ;). After he goes through with the bush hog he'll till it then manage it with a drag for a while until the trail is better established.

Trevelyan96
Aug. 14, 2012, 08:10 PM
Thanks for saying this! I didn't know the photos were in Post #1.

It is amazing.

One thing I am wondering: I take it that goats can eat poison ivy without harm, since the OP said there was a lot of poison ivy on the lot and NOTHING is left. So, do people have to take care about touching the goats if they have been around the poison ivy? I would think the oils would get on their bodies, or beards and mouths, at least.

Unfortunately, yes. I learned this the hard way this week. I've been applying calamine for the last 2 days. :(

According to the goat owner, poison ivy is their favorite food. They always go for it first. I can attest to that as well.

back in the saddle
Aug. 14, 2012, 08:12 PM
How many goats ate that?

Trevelyan96
Aug. 14, 2012, 08:17 PM
How many goats ate that?

30 goats in 4 days on somewhere between 1/2-3/4 acre. They're on the 2nd section now, which is around 1/4 acre. At the rate they're going, they'll be done by Wednesday night or Thursday. So 1 week to clear an acre.

The section includes a cliff type drop off that appears to have been created by some long ago gravel mining, and they completely cleared that as well. Amazing creatures. I have no idea how they manged to clean that up, its an almost perfectly vertical drop of about 20 feet. But the clamber up and down it like its nothing. They'll also stand up on their hind legs to eat anything in reach, so everything is cleared up to about 6' high.

2tempe
Aug. 15, 2012, 09:48 AM
This is absolutely amazing........I had no idea what a good job they would do!!
Its also a little frightening - if you own goats and they eat like that, how do you keep them from eating the house and everything else???

Now if you could only rent a beaver or two to take down the trees you didn't want.

trubandloki
Aug. 15, 2012, 10:21 AM
Wow, that is some impressive cleaning they did. Extra bonus for finding a way to get the area cleaned that did not involve your hubby having to do it.

Belleaphant
Aug. 15, 2012, 10:47 AM
They'll also stand up on their hind legs to eat anything in reach, so everything is cleared up to about 6' high.

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/378173_506890700525_9475_n.jpg

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/428969_506890710505_136_n.jpg (no he's not pregnant.. just fat)

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/2801_506890740445_2507_n.jpg Coby telling Belle to keep rubbing...it might make branches fall! Or he plotting how he can launch on her to reach the branches..

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/287_506890381165_9289_n.jpg

That's for sure! here's Coby doing what he does best. If only we could teach them to eat the poison Ivy. Both our goats prefer 2nd cutting hay that is off the ground... god forbid it gets stepped on! :D I wish our goats would eat the brush

trubandloki
Aug. 15, 2012, 02:14 PM
OP, how did you find the person who rented out the goats? Wondering if there is this option in my area.

ReSomething
Aug. 15, 2012, 02:24 PM
Man, talk about the ravening horde! I'm impressed.

Trevelyan96
Aug. 16, 2012, 05:03 PM
OP, how did you find the person who rented out the goats? Wondering if there is this option in my area.

They have a farm right around the corner that sells produce, goat meat, etc. I stopped to buy some annuals and jokingly asked her if she rents her goats. I was amazed to learn that they do, and actually work the the Univ. of MD on researach.

They have finished the job and will be leaving tomorrow. I will miss the little monsters.

Mosey_2003
Aug. 16, 2012, 05:20 PM
They found a car out there!!!

Trevelyan96
Aug. 16, 2012, 07:59 PM
http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/378173_506890700525_9475_n.jpg

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/428969_506890710505_136_n.jpg (no he's not pregnant.. just fat)

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/2801_506890740445_2507_n.jpg Coby telling Belle to keep rubbing...it might make branches fall! Or he plotting how he can launch on her to reach the branches..

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/287_506890381165_9289_n.jpg

That's for sure! here's Coby doing what he does best. If only we could teach them to eat the poison Ivy. Both our goats prefer 2nd cutting hay that is off the ground... god forbid it gets stepped on! :D I wish our goats would eat the brush

Bellephant, your goats are adorable. Glad your horse seems to like them. Inky - not so much. He tried really hard to kill the ones that got into the pasture on Sunday.

traklover
Aug. 19, 2012, 10:24 AM
I have about 5 acres, hilly,some places steep overgrown (I dont think its touched in 15+ years) at my newer farm.

I would eventually like to reclaim some of it for another turn out spot. It might be cheaper for me to buy temporary fencing and buy some goats :)

Great Idea and cant belive how great a job those goats did!

vxf111
Aug. 19, 2012, 11:29 AM
This is so, so, awesome. And I had NO IDEA was even available. I love goats!

PeteyPie
Aug. 21, 2012, 05:28 PM
Trevelyan96, can horses eat poison ivy? Will they maintain that cleared area on their own, or do you think you will need a touch up every now and then by the goats?

Trevelyan96
Aug. 21, 2012, 05:31 PM
Trevelyan96, can horses eat poison ivy? Will they maintain that cleared area on their own, or do you think you will need a touch up every now and then by the goats?

I don't think the horses will maintain it, and we actually don't have any immediate plans to fence it at. We bought a bushog to keep it maintained! The plan is to set up a small x country course down there with some of the bigger fallen logs.

fivehorses
Aug. 21, 2012, 10:31 PM
It certainly is impressive.
Our forefathers understood all this stuff...you get the goats in to clean up brush, then the pigs dig/root up things, sheep graze the weeds,etc

In the book, 'the omnivore's dilemma' he goes into this a bit.

Before machinery, animals did the work, then were our dinner.
I don't eat meat, so that makes it difficult for me to use animals in this way, although if I did eat meat, this is the way I'd go.