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hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 13, 2012, 03:42 AM
Hi there everyone,

I was wondering if anyone had any good examples of nice multi-discipline training facilities you would like to share. We are looking for some examples of farms with multiple arenas, barns, and lots of pasture and paddocks.

We are in progress of designing and planning our facility. We would like to include a main barn with an attached indoor area, a training barn for me, a covered jump arena, a few outdoors for dressage and jumping, grass jump ring, and a small cross country course.

Please reply with links or info or PM me.

Thanks for the help.

carolprudm
Mar. 13, 2012, 08:02 AM
Much of that is really dependent on your terrain. Your local Soil and Water Conservation Service or DNR should be able to help.

I rode in 2 clinics here (http://www.wyndham-oaks.com/facility.htm#The)

http://www.wyndham-oaks.com/facility.htm#The Indoor Arena

kasjordan
Mar. 13, 2012, 08:59 AM
I would look into how barns have their indoors attached. Ours is open above to the main barn's hay loft- and there's alot of dust from the indoor. I wouldn't do that if I was designing. That indoor generates lots and lots of dust sometimes. Just a thought to keep in mind.

BravAddict
Mar. 13, 2012, 09:30 AM
Agree on attached indoors. I know that any structure will eventually be coated in dust, but who wants to accelerate the process? If it were my choice, no hay loft and no attached indoor.

Bluey
Mar. 13, 2012, 10:41 AM
Indoor arenas separated by a wall and doors from the stables, all under one roof, don't necessarily have to be a dust problem for the stable area.
I know many that are not.
The convenience of attached buildings, other than hay, that is a real fire hazard, should be stored in it's own separate building, is priceless in bad weather.

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 24, 2012, 06:18 PM
We are thinking of building our main arena 100 x 200 feet and making 100 feet of it covered and the other half uncovered. On the side there would be a 12 stall barn with a wash rack, a few cross ties, and a big tack room.

There is a place I ran across which has an arena similar (http://eremonfarm.com/facilities.html) but no barn attached. One question is what is the best way to design turnouts?

Since we are going to be building about 50 stalls, we don't want individual paddocks for everyone. Should we maybe do 15 paddocks and some bigger grass pastures and offer half day turnout?

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 24, 2012, 06:21 PM
Bluey, there was a barn near us that recently had a bad fire and lost several horses. We are defiantly building a separate hay and bedding barn and its going to be one of the modular barn types that is fire safe. Our feed and grains going to be in separate sheds outside each barn too.

Plumcreek
Mar. 26, 2012, 02:34 AM
Weather/wind directions, drainage, and orientation of the slope of the land (in areas with cold winters) are the first things to consider. They will dictate a lot of what you plan.

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 26, 2012, 02:54 AM
We are going to be building on top of a hillside so drainage will be pretty good. We were thinking that we were going to put all the barns and paddocks on the higher part of the property then the pastures and cross country course down below as well. The site is 120 acres and most of it will be usable, just a little to steep for stuff.

TheJenners
Mar. 26, 2012, 03:39 AM
Wow, how luck you are to be at this stage of planning out what sounds like a nice facility!! I bet you are excited (and stressed).

I created a thread that discussed attached v not-attached indoors (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=282879), and there was a lot of good discussion there on that.

An example of a barn with, I think, good layout, is my Mom's facility. I'm still on the fence with attached indoors of any good size, because of the cost. But she has one barn that is 120' long with 16 stalls, and another barn with a few stalls and hay/equip storage right next to it, about 20' away. Making a second building an indoor might be more cost effective than a wide span for an attached indoor??

I wish I could put up a Web site, but hers just isn't that good anymore (http://seven-oaks.org) and it doesn't have as many pictures as it did before....

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2012, 07:20 AM
Wow, how luck you are to be at this stage of planning out what sounds like a nice facility!! I bet you are excited (and stressed).

I created a thread that discussed attached v not-attached indoors (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=282879), and there was a lot of good discussion there on that.

An example of a barn with, I think, good layout, is my Mom's facility. I'm still on the fence with attached indoors of any good size, because of the cost. But she has one barn that is 120' long with 16 stalls, and another barn with a few stalls and hay/equip storage right next to it, about 20' away. Making a second building an indoor might be more cost effective than a wide span for an attached indoor??

I wish I could put up a Web site, but hers just isn't that good anymore (http://seven-oaks.org) and it doesn't have as many pictures as it did before....

Not necessarily, may be the other way around, as building an arena and following the roof line with an attached area for stalls, tackroom etc. is cheaper than building two whole structures.
If nothing else, that common wall/supports is cheaper than two of those.

That is what we may build some day, takes the less material and labor to build and less labor later to run, everything being under one roof.
This is the way so many bigger barn/arenas are built any more, cost the least, easiest to work from and practically no maintenance to them.

Scroll down to the grey building with attached stalls on the long sides:

http://www.ranchandgolf.com/miscprojects.html

Still, each one has their own preferences, cost is only one of the considerations.

(Does anyone know why some links I just can't open, keeps saying "Safari can't open the page ... "):(

TheJenners
Mar. 26, 2012, 02:43 PM
Bluey, you provided a lot of information on the thread I linked to ;). And I did more reading and liked the idea of the "main" structure being the indoor, and a "lean-to" for the barn area. The way I was reading it, since the "lean-to" doesn't share the spans, it'll be cheaper.

Cost goes up with width, after all.

DH and I are still throwing ideas around. The one he likes the most, is the one I absolutely abhor, but I'll put it up for the OP to see. It's a large arena (with calf chutes and round pen in it), and the stalls, tack room, etc are along the top/short side and more stalls down one long side. Hay storage is at the bottom/short side. No real good pictures, but the Web site shows one small pic down at the bottom of the training page. (http://www.stickhorsetraining.com/stickhorsetraining.com/Training.html) The aisle has to be sweep several times a day when the indoor is getting used, and you have to blow off a spot on the wall to lean your arms, or else you get FILTHY.

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2012, 04:01 PM
If we get to some day build our barn, a neighbor is part of this, we will buy the whole 120' x 250' metal barn kit and erect it ourselves from the certified engineering specs that come with those, that are approved by counties and insurances.

Then, later, for the overhang on a long side for stalls and on the front for the roping chutes, we will buy the metal for framing and the sheet metal locally and build it ourselves from that.
While you tie in to the main building, the overhang can be made easily self supporting, or close to it.

The local company is not even close to competitive with the prices of the larger ones, so for the main building, we will buy from them.

You may consider getting whoever builds it for you to check into that.

Now, if someone has more financing, they can get those companies that turn key build the whole thing and those tend to be very good, just very costly.

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 28, 2012, 02:00 AM
I think ill post some of my ideas on here for you guys to look at. I have a ton of layouts I have been working on and rearranging. We probably are going to attach some stalls onto a covered arena and have a open concept design with European stall fronts and then maybe shared paddocks behind for every few stalls and so on days they can't go into the field they will get out for a few hours.

I recently visited a barn like that and it seemed to function quite well. One issue I see with a bunch of barns is that the cross ties are in the aisle so your constantly moving to let people go by. Thanks for the feedback everyone!

Tasker
Mar. 28, 2012, 05:34 AM
If you need dimensions or more specifics - just pop us a note. If you scroll down this page (http://watermark-farm.net/services.html), you'll see our layout. We started (in 1970) with the old cow barn, renovated it to 12 stalls and then added the indoor in 1980, stallion barn (6 stalls) in '86. The paddocks are pretty much Jenny Craig dirt lots now, but we have easy keepers for the most part, so that works just fine.

As for dust & the indoor being attached to the barn and above the stalls hay storage - all of that depends on your management and topographical layout! We have loft storage in both barns and maintain the footing in the indoor so there is very, very little dust with excellent airflow from the barn into the indoor, not the reverse...so it is possible!

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 28, 2012, 10:02 PM
Here is one of our first designs. 14x14 Stalls with european stall fronts so its pretty open, big tack room, three cross ties, and maybe one of them a wash rack or we'll add one where a stall is. We do want plenty of cross ties because we go through horses quick and my working students will have a bunch out all the time. I am going to put a shedrow near this barn most likely for school horses and some of mine. Since these stalls are the biggest we'll have I want to save them for boarders only.

http://www.freeimagehosting.net/t/1xhjb.jpg (http://www.freeimagehosting.net/1xhjb)

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 28, 2012, 10:03 PM
Sorry the picture didnt come out well, I'll try and get a better one.

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 28, 2012, 10:25 PM
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7083/6879489808_c297f119f1_b.jpg

Calvincrowe
Mar. 28, 2012, 10:43 PM
Having boarded for years, and worked in boarding barns--feed storage inside the barn (grain, at least) is much easier on the help, especially with a long barn aisle.

As a boarder--attached indoor is more attractive than a walk to the indoor from the stalls. Having the option to have mud-free paddocks to the stalls and turnout is very, very attractive (those paddocks need to be cleaned daily, so it adds to your labor costs though).

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:19 AM
I might add the feed and med room back onto the barn, it does take up space for stalls though which was my concern. What if it was placed closer to the front of the barn, do you think that would help?

The paddocks are something I looked for when choosing a barn because some days the pastures were to wet and I didn't mind having my horse take a day off pasture so they can grow a little or at least not get worse. There is a barn nearby which has small paddocks off each stall, probably about 12x12 which is nice so they can get fresh air, then they have 10 big paddocks with sand for them to go in throughout the winter.

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:46 AM
Here's a map of our property I made. It might show up as gray on some browsers but on the far right there is power lines, the very bottom is slightly sloped downwards, the left goes up and becomes a small plateau, then the central and rest is flat.

The plan was to put one barn up on the plateau, paddocks along the sloped part because they would drain fairly well and the soil is stable, then put the arenas and cross country on the flat plain. There is still some forest that we want to leave and are going to make a trail course in it too!

hiddenbrooknb
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:47 AM
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7105/7025853739_1ac8b656f5_o.png

hiddenbrooknb
Apr. 5, 2012, 11:59 PM
I gathered some pics and created a slideshow. Please let me know what you think or if you have anything to add. Pretty much everything has some aspect I like to it and thats why it was added. More to come soon.

https://picasaweb.google.com/106749217452330716012/April5201202#slideshow/5728131606713037618

TheJenners
Apr. 6, 2012, 12:00 AM
Linky no worky

Calvincrowe
Apr. 6, 2012, 12:46 AM
I prefer boarding in a barn with attached paddocks--even 12 x 12 is better than stall only. I'd recommend 12 x 24 or 36 however. Use geotextile cloth and gravel as footing in the attached paddocks and pick the poop daily as you clean stalls. With those in addition to pastures or large paddocks for turnout, you add to the allure of your barn. Another thing-- gutters and drainage is essential (you haven't said where you live, but here in the PNW moving water away from the barn is critical to mud control).

I'd put the feed in the barn, you'll appreciate it when it is raining or snowing or super cold, as will your help. Store your hay elsewhere, but have a provision for a day or two in the barn along with your hay.

Sounds dumb, but frost free faucets along the aisle with hoses that have brass nozzles will make watering so easy. Also, electrical outlets set along the aisle are nice, as are cross ties. If you only have a couple of grooming bays (and in a busy barn, those will be constantly in use) you'll need to either insist on tacking up in stalls or be prepared with ties in the aisle.

TheJenners
Apr. 6, 2012, 10:45 AM
I currently board where there are attached sand/crusher run runs that open to paddocks. I don't care for it. The poop gets scooped once or twice a day, but the urine is just...there. There is definitely an odor of urine in the summer time. It works great for us now and works for the BO, who can literally do everything she needs to do twice a day without touching a single a horse, but I wouldn't build it.

Plus with the traffic in and out of the stall, when it rains there is a lot of water ( = mud) right in front of the door, that takes a while to dry, so if your horse decides to NOT come in, you have to walk through the mud to get him/her.

Ghazzu
Apr. 6, 2012, 11:17 AM
I recently visited a barn like that and it seemed to function quite well. One issue I see with a bunch of barns is that the cross ties are in the aisle so your constantly moving to let people go by. Thanks for the feedback everyone!

One facility I used to ride at had the indoor separated from the main barn by a corridor which had an entryway from the parking area, the stairway to an upstairs office and the barn loft, feed room , two tack rooms, a spacious washstall and 4 grooming bays.
One of the tack rooms had viewing windows on the indoor side. The 2nd floor office had them as well.

hiddenbrooknb
Apr. 6, 2012, 05:37 PM
Sorry about the link, I'll try and see why it wont show up. The names of some of the places I like are:

Tall Firs Equestrian Center in Redmond, WA
Pumpkin Ridge Equestrian Center in Oregon
KGF Equestrian Center in Kirkland, WA
Pumpkin Farms Dressage in Monroe, WA

There are also some others but I am using ideas from them more so than others. I defiantly am going to try and put some attached paddocks on some barns that drain well.

I also think I am going to look into Barn Pros. Maybe not order the material from them but they have some nice ideas for barns.

seabreeze
Apr. 6, 2012, 07:29 PM
One suggestion based on the first drawing (didn't open the later links): Consider centrally locating your cross-tie bays and your tack room (crossfire and tack room in the middle with seven stalls on either side). It will be more convenient.

Congratulations and have fun!

Satin Filly
Apr. 6, 2012, 07:47 PM
If I were building a barn....

I would have a ceiling sprinkler system installed and wired up to a smoke detector & fire alarm. I would also install a sprinkler system in the indoor so watering the arena is as simple as flicking a switch.

The paddocks and pasture fences would be 4 board fences, with space inbetween each pasture's fence line. (It sounds like you have the acreage to do this!). Also keep in mind that the ground near pasture gates gets easily destroyed and muddy. Even more so when you live in a wet climate. I would have some type of (small rounded) gravel/limestone surface on your walkways that extends under the pasture gates/entrances and gradually flows into grass in the pastures. Hopefully this will prevent those areas from getting too mucked up by providing good drainage.

The stalls would have windows so the horses can poke their heads out and this will allow better air circulation in the barn.

I personally like attached indoor arenas (makes it nice when its raining!). However, I can't stand it when there are stalls open to the arena. Who wants their horse to breathe in dust all day? Not me...

A barn I boarded at YEARS ago, had the tack room/viewing room placed at the short end of the indoor arena. It had windows on both sides....one side faced the indoor and the other side faced the outdoor (climate controlled, too).

Thats all I can think of at the moment....