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ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 12, 2012, 09:09 PM
Just read in another thread someone selling their eggs for $5.

Wow, I must be ripping myself off, as I only sell my free range eggs for $2 a dozen. Actually, I have never ask money for them. I just take whatever they hand me. $2 seems to be about it, even though they rave about the eggs.

Since I do deworm my chickens I do not know if I can call them "organic" or not? What are the rules for calling them organic?

Simkie
Mar. 12, 2012, 09:45 PM
Eggs from my local dairy--free range, organic, no corn or soy in the feed--are $6/dozen, IIRC.

Eggs from Door to Door Organic, sourced from a local supplier, free range, antibiotic free, don't see an "organic" label on them, are $5/dozen.

If you call them "organic" you have to be certified. Lots of paperwork and $$ to do that, from what I understand.

Bopper
Mar. 12, 2012, 09:50 PM
I was under the impression 'organic' was not using highly processed feed. We sell for $2.50 and ours eat laying crumbles with scratch grains, so not organic.

ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 12, 2012, 10:00 PM
Guess I am not organic either, as they do get 2 cups of layers crumbles a day, in with their sprouted grains, tossed veggies from the store, & free range pickings. They also get kelp, flax, blah, blah, blah...

ReSomething
Mar. 12, 2012, 10:04 PM
Ours are free range but not "organic". Like she said, lots of paperwork to be certified organic. We have flysprays, deworm the horses, none of that would let us be certified. Deworming the chix with most commercial preparations would be a definite no no.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 12, 2012, 11:46 PM
I sell mine for $3.50 a dozen...and at markets I ask for $3.75 and get it easily. Most pastured poultry folks around here are at $4.00 a dozen at least. I am not organic but my hens free range.

I price mine just under the high range grocery store eggs like Eggland's best which are typically close to $4.00 a dozen. I know mine taste way way better than those anemic things and once someone has eaten them, they'll be back! I'm a "pusher" and get folks addicted to my eggs! ;-)

Now if I did go organic, I'd have to price them closer to $5.00 a dozen. That feed is way more expensive. I wish I could...I truly do...but I can't justify that increase price nor cost when I don't think there is a real difference. My hens get a lot of natural foods and the mash is mainly fed in winter and as a backup in the coop when it's too hot for them to forage in summer.

WoofNWhinny*
Mar. 13, 2012, 12:18 AM
Last I checked, free range, non-organic eggs were around $2.20 a dozen at Whole Foods. Regular eggs at Shoppers are probably around $1.40 or so.

I see people listing farm eggs at $2 to $3/doz. on CL.

RougeEmpire
Mar. 13, 2012, 12:21 AM
Whole Foods Market sells "free range, Araucana (green)" eggs for $4.00 or more per...wait for it....half dozen.

MaybeMorgan
Mar. 13, 2012, 12:50 AM
I buy eggs from a couple who apologized for raising the price from $1.75 to $2 and I told them I would be more than happy paying a lot more. Not only do I know where they came from (free-range chickens) but I can't eat a "store egg" anymore.

SanJacMonument
Mar. 13, 2012, 01:00 AM
I wish we had more Organic / Free Range egg farms around here. My two sources are usually out but charge $3 per dozen - if that helps.

UrbanHennery
Mar. 13, 2012, 01:44 AM
I get $4 / dozen for mine in the spring and summer, $5 / dozen in the fall winter. I bill them as free range, sort of pastured, happy chickens that eat mostly things they find and certified organic feed. I do worm, and I do feed kitchen scraps that may or may not be organic.

I've got more potential customers than I do eggs, so I must be doing something right.

2DogsFarm
Mar. 13, 2012, 08:12 AM
And we have a Winner!
Or is that "weiner"?

In Chgo @ Whole Foods I've seen "freerange, organic" XL brown eggs for.........

$.69 EACH = $8.28/dozen
:eek:

For that price they should include the chicken!

I have just 6 hens, so even when everyone is laying I give away a dozen to coworkers & friends just to avoid be overrun with eggage ;)

RacetrackReject
Mar. 13, 2012, 10:02 AM
I sell mine, green/blue/brown/olive, for $1.50/dozen (all sizes mixed). My chickens are free range and do not get commercial layer feeds, but do get grain.

I know I'm way underpriced, but it doesn't really matter to me.

JB
Mar. 13, 2012, 10:07 AM
I was under the impression 'organic' was not using highly processed feed.

Not at all. A food can be processed - that's not what makes it organic or not. But to be truly organic, not only can the feeds not be processed with chemicals, you on the farm cannot use chemicals on your animals or your land. It may not be quite that black and white, but that's the gist of it.

Organic is not simply "natural". It's not the same as free range, not the same as grain-fed (or grain-free in terms of cattle). You could probably feed an inappropriate diet, from a longevity stand point, and still qualify for "organic" as long as the rest of it falls into place

OneGrayPony
Mar. 13, 2012, 11:44 AM
Criminey, I sell our free range eggs for 2.50/doz.

That is, when I think to do it.

We just dumped a full batch because I didn't have the time to hand them out and I HATE washing eggs. I tried to explain that the natural bloom was important, but people...*sigh* they just don't get it. I should get an egg washer, maybe I'd hate that less.

Calvincrowe
Mar. 13, 2012, 11:46 AM
My eggs are advertised as: "Free-range brown eggs from happy, well-adjusted hens".

When asked specifically about diet, I tell them they get a high-quality commercial layer pellet (Layena from Purina..usually), veggies (scraps from kitchen), leftovers (anything that doesn't go into the compost or dog dishes) and anything they can catch and eat in nature (I don't tell them about the occasional "rodent":eek:).

Mine sell for $3/dozen, and I never have enough. However, I had to donate eggs to our local food bank one summer when all 12 were laying hard and fast--damn, that's a lot of eggs!!!

Benson
Mar. 13, 2012, 11:50 AM
My husband and I are Certified Organic vegetable and grain farmers, certified by QCS in Florida. If we were to sell organic eggs, we would need to purchase certified organic feed. It would have this logo on the label: http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3004446&acct=nopgeninfo

We feed our laying hens organic feed from Organic Unlimited in Atglen, Pennsylvania, which is the feed mill where we sell our grain. It's around $22 a bag.

We used to sell organic eggs for $4.50/dozen. The math doesn't work out for the labor. When fencing, coop, feed, waterers, feeders, egg cartons, etc are all accounted for, we made a few cents a dozen. Once labor was added at $20/hr (this includes taxes and everthing else to make one a legal employee) it didn't pay.

I think it's really cool how many small producers are contributing to our local economy. Think of how many folks on this board produce eggs and how many customers each has, it's really quite amazing the impact small producers are having on the market. What they are called doesn't really matter, as long as you're not using the term "organic" if you're not. Those of us who are organic spend considerable time and energy to educate customers and maintain our certification and we sometimes bristle a bit when it's misrepresented.

kmw2707
Mar. 13, 2012, 01:24 PM
I'm still only charging $1 a doz. from my free range happy hens. They lay beautiful brown eggs and I have way more customers than eggs.

**must up my price

Bacardi1
Mar. 13, 2012, 01:25 PM
Just read in another thread someone selling their eggs for $5.

Wow, I must be ripping myself off, as I only sell my free range eggs for $2 a dozen. Actually, I have never ask money for them. I just take whatever they hand me. $2 seems to be about it, even though they rave about the eggs.

Since I do deworm my chickens I do not know if I can call them "organic" or not? What are the rules for calling them organic?

If you deworm or medicate your chickens in any way, you do know that you can't consume the eggs for a minimum of 14 days afterwards, don't you? Sure hope so.

And you can't legally call your sale eggs "organic" unless you're government-certifed to do so, which means feeding only organic-certified feeds along with a bunch of other brouhaha stuff. You CAN, however, claim that you don't MEDICATE or TREAT your hens in any way with any commercial preparation (which, if you worm your hens, you obviously can't do).

If I were you, I'd just go with the humane or free-range angle (if your birds do free-range) & skip the "organic" designation. It can be a thin line, but if someone calls you on it, in this litigious society we're in now, it could end up trouble.

emaren
Mar. 13, 2012, 02:08 PM
I think it must depend on where you are. I advertised my extra free-range eggs for $2/dozen on craigslist and I didn't get any responses. However my co-workers were happy to take them for free and were mighty upset when a predator knocked out my egg production. I am in Arkansas, there is not a lot of education on food quality, but in Little Rock it is growing.

dangerbunny
Mar. 13, 2012, 02:14 PM
We sell our eggs for $3. per dozen, they are truly free range and generally 50/50 blue/green and brown.

chism
Mar. 13, 2012, 02:20 PM
I'm in Massachusetts. I sell mine for $3.00 a dozen, which is less than the cage free ones in the grocery store and much less than the Auracauna and Marans 1/2 dozens that have appeared recently. A dozen regular eggs go for $1.89-$2.69, depending on where you buy them. I only sell to friends & coworkers. I like to use the plastic recyclable egg containers which cost me about $.50 each, so that obviously adds to the price. Honestly...I only make enough to pay to feed the chickens & buy the egg cartons, but that's fine by me.

RacetrackReject
Mar. 13, 2012, 02:31 PM
I should add that I live in an extremely rural area, so I don't think I could get $3.00/dozen or more. I also see others selling for $2.00/dozen frequently. I get tons of eggs, 2 dozen a day, so sometimes I get a stockpile and that's when I hand them out to neighbors for free. They offer to pay, but we have a pretty good buddy system in my neighborhood and I've gotten venison, grass fed beef, fresh pork, and veggies for free from other neighbors, so I don't mind handing eggs out to them without charging.

My chickens are truly free range. I have a large covered chicken pen but the chickens only go in there to roost or lay generally. The rest of the time they are running around over several acres and causing mass havoc.

I have around 33 hens and 3 are currently broody (6 babies so far!!).

OneGrayPony
Mar. 13, 2012, 05:23 PM
LOL free range chickens are a hoot, aren't they? Ours go everywhere and every once in awhile one gets broody in an odd place that we then have to rescue her from (like the kids treehouse). They change egg laying locations frequently when we discover clutches...it's easter every day!

SmartAlex
Mar. 13, 2012, 05:27 PM
My mother's free range cackle club was having a sun bathing party in the sawdust just inside the barn door today. They looked like they were having a ball! Even the poor hen that my horse tripped and fell on a couple of weeks ago! :lol:

OneGrayPony
Mar. 13, 2012, 05:49 PM
OMG, did she do the squat thing? We're down one rooster (RIP...but thank god) and so now any time you approach a hen they do the squat down thing. It's cute and sort of feels like they are bowing before you...HOWEVER...when you are carrying a bale of hay and cannot see your feet and they insist on being right underneath you, it IS the most annoying thing in the whole wide world.

Well...maybe not the most annoying.

Ours are also unimpressed by cars. In the fall the nuts fall off the trees and the cars break them, so the chickens now rush the car every time we pull into the driveway. Beeping the horn has no effect and just earns you an irritated "Crrrraaaaaauuuuugggghhhhh" as they look at you disdainfully.

My favorite has been watching them stalk the squirrels. The squirrels have been digging up and eating the rest of their nuts, and the chickens follow them around the yard waiting for them to drop it...then I kid you not, they RUSH the squirrel and try to chase him/her off the nuts.

They really do provide me with an endless source of entertainment — definitely better than reality TV!

SmartAlex
Mar. 13, 2012, 05:52 PM
OMG, did she do the squat thing? We're down one rooster (RIP...but thank god) and so now any time you approach a hen they do the squat down thing. It's cute and sort of feels like they are bowing before you...HOWEVER...when you are carrying a bale of hay and cannot see your feet and they insist on being right underneath you, it IS the most annoying thing in the whole wide world.

No, according to my mother, they were "frolicing" in the same play area (she was probably spreading manure far and wide looking for grain) and he slipped and fell and landed on her. She had a hitch in her getalong for a few days, but she's laying again.

ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 13, 2012, 06:32 PM
Ah yes, the free range egg hunt. I pretty well have pegged all their spots. Last year someone left me eggs in the fork of a tree. If I find eggs in a new spot, they get boiled up for the dogs to eat. I take a pass on using the initial find for humans.

I have one hen that drives me nutty. Now her, I keep locked up in the coop/run. She is in the trees, & she's the one that crosses the road taking the rest of the flock with her. She is in my gardening pots. She is roosting on the leaf springs of the farm truck. If there is somewhere I do not want a chicken, she has been there. Quite frankly she is now locked up as I am afraid I will find her drown in a water trough. There is water all over for the small animals/chickens, but she must think her reflection is so much prettier in the water troughs.

Here's an idea for other bleeding heart folks...In the summer I freeze water for the little animals & put it out to thaw in their water containers. We pretty well spend our summers in triple digit heat here. Last summer was especially brutal. Gotta help out the creatures anyway we can. :)

OneGrayPony
Mar. 13, 2012, 06:48 PM
Love the frozen water idea!

We usually float our "finds" to see how fresh they are. If they are fresh enough to sink and stay sunk, we eat them. If they stand up...well...off they go. Ours change locations every time we find them though! For awhile they were laying right under the front bush, which was really convenient for egg collection but a pain in the rear to take the dogs out. Our dogs are not trusted with the chickens, being high prey drive dobermans and a...less than trustworthy JRT cross.

We have to listen for the "egg announcements" and watch them carefully...that gives us the clues as to where to look. The latest trend has been to lay underneath the goats' hay rack and several times we've brought those girls in and they've been brooding the eggs for the hens.

I love when I'm inside doing paperwork and concentrating and all of a sudden I hear RAP RAP RAP on the window, and a little lizard eye is staring in at me....

Bacardi1
Mar. 14, 2012, 01:12 PM
Around here, prices for locally "grown" eggs are all over the map, whether or not they are marked "organic", "free-range", or have no connotation at all.

At the farmers markets, prices run between $3 & $4/dozen; the same eggs from the same sources sold at one of the local organic shops go for $5.

2DogsFarm
Mar. 14, 2012, 01:13 PM
:uhoh: OMG...
Now I think I need to perform a Search & Rescue for eggs.
I've been getting 1-3/day and considering my self lucky since everyone moulted Bigtime last Fall and then stopped laying...
But now that they're out all day, I wonder if they are laying in one of their hangouts - underneath my pine trees where the low-hanging branches make a little "gazebo" for them.

ThisToo: my teen rooster is the Gangleader who takes his girls across the road to annoy the neighbors who do NOT appreciate the chickens' landscaping efforts.
Who needs neat little rings of mulch when you can have it decoratively broadcast?
Go figure....

Diamondindykin
Mar. 14, 2012, 01:58 PM
I have been trying for years to get chickens and duck but Mr. DDK won't budge. He says it makes no sense to build a coop, buy food and all the work when I can buy eggs at the grocery store for $1.59 a dozen. It makes sense but I would still like my own chickens :yes:

Calvincrowe
Mar. 14, 2012, 03:02 PM
Diamond- have him do a search on how commercial eggs are produced--that might change his mind!!:eek:

Do I save money on the eggs that I raise? Maybe a bit, but I know that my girls really are happy and well-adjusted, I know what they ate and that they aren't suffering so I can eat what they produce. Same reason I can eat my friend's beef and my nephew's market lambs--I met them, watched them grow and know how they met their end. And, darn it, they are tasty.

Bacardi1
Mar. 14, 2012, 04:11 PM
Diamond - it might make sense from an economic viewpoint, but it sure doesn't from a quality viewpoint. The difference between the quality of a grocery-store egg & a home-produced egg is like night & day in terms of color, consistency, & flavor. Remember that what goes into a hen - a wonderful varied diet, fresh water, sunlight, fresh air, even just feeling safe & secure, etc., etc., comes out in the eggs.

SmartAlex
Mar. 14, 2012, 04:13 PM
My husband fell in love with the chickens. When he had a bad day I would come home and find him sitting in the midle of the chicken run with a bowl of cold spaghetti noodles covered in chickens.

We don't currently have chickens, but he has been asking for them. :yes: Of course he prefers the meat chickens so the hobby doesn't run into the winter. He likes the fun of raising them then he wants them in the freezer before the fun runs out.

RacetrackReject
Mar. 14, 2012, 05:24 PM
Yeah, but for $1.59/dozen you get some pasty anemic looking barely yellow egg yolk. With free range eggs you get a gorgeous deep dark rich orange yolk that just has no comparison in taste. Also, I was one of those people that every once in a while, after eating eggs, would get sick. Since I've had my free range chickens, I haven't been sick like that once. I have the same issues with regular store bought beef as well, so I feel like it has to do with something they are supplementing the animals with that causes this for me.

Just a side note, but my mother's friend is a chef and she swears that one cannot make a cornbread that comes close to comparing with one made with fresh free range eggs.

2DogsFarm
Mar. 14, 2012, 05:40 PM
DDK:
originally I wanted my hens for bug patrol in the pastures.
A task they are only middling good at - they prefer the lawns and the occasional foray to a neighbors' place :rolleyes:

BUT:
I bet you Mr DDK will find them as amusing as Mr SA & I do.
Who knew there was so much personality in 5# of feathers?

And the eggs, O.M.G. The EGGS!!!
There is no comparison to supermarket eggs. Period.
The taste is truly different, richer and just BETTER.
Plus everything I cook with my homegrown eggs takes on the near Dayglo bright yellow of the yolks :yes:
A friend's recipe for an egg-based sauce was cream-colored when he made it, goldenrod when I did.

Yes: the coop will be your largest outlay unless you can do something like I did and recycle a garden shed.
But a month's worth of layer pellets costs me around $12 for 6 hens.
Add oyster shell - for calcium - & grit for when they aren't out freeranging & finding their own, and you can add maybe $10 to the total.
Chickens are CHEEP! <sorry, couldn't stop myself :winkgrin:

OneGrayPony
Mar. 14, 2012, 06:03 PM
I have a great picture of two free range eggs cracked into a bowl with two grocery store brown "cage free organic" eggs that I had purchased in a pinch before the girls started laying again.

It's pretty amazing.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 14, 2012, 06:34 PM
Tell him that the chickens are food security for when bad times come...somewhat seriously I say this. The less dependent we all are on the grocery store for our foods, you will find yourself a lot more secure in what many believe will be uncertain times ahead. A few chickens cost next to nothing to keep. They live off table scraps, plants, bugs, even squash and veggies.

Not even counting the egg quality issue..which is tremendous as the others have pointed out...tell him it will be a source of inexpensive good food at very little work and trouble.

RacetrackReject
Mar. 14, 2012, 06:42 PM
And, you wouldn't have to dye Easter eggs anymore. =)

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/381698_2939302639999_1184135915_3195352_394928488_ n.jpg

FLeventer
Mar. 14, 2012, 10:16 PM
I eventually want chickens. I buy from my old trainer who has a few and she charges me $1 a dozen, but I have to supply the carton. I used to get sick off of eating eggs and now I can eat them without sickness.

Diamondindykin
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:12 AM
I know...........I have tried everything :no: My only obstacle is a chicken coop. I want a good amount of chickens so a small coop isn't the answer. I am envisioning a 12x12 walk-in coop with a large wire run (we have coyotes). I cannot build this myself without Mr. DDK :( I looked into buying one from Home Depot and they are a couple thousand. Any suggestions for talking him into it:confused: I want my own chickens ;)

Tapperjockey
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:15 AM
I know...........I have tried everything :no: My only obstacle is a chicken coop. I want a good amount of chickens so a small coop isn't the answer. I am envisioning a 12x12 walk-in coop with a large wire run (we have coyotes). I cannot build this myself without Mr. DDK :( I looked into buying one from Home Depot and they are a couple thousand. Any suggestions for talking him into it:confused: I want my own chickens ;)

Start building one yourself. He'll get frustrated watching you try this, and come help. (especially useful to use his tools, incorrectly. use the mallet to pound a nail.. swear a lot. men like to fix things..)

FLeventer
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:25 AM
Start building one yourself. He'll get frustrated watching you try this, and come help. (especially useful to use his tools, incorrectly. use the mallet to pound a nail.. swear a lot. men like to fix things..)

This is how I get my SO to do anything.

"Hey babe, I'm going to build this paddock..."

I hold up a hammer, tiny wall nails, and a shovel. He looks at me and asks where the post digger is. I act like an idiot, tilt my head slightly, and give him this look. "whats that?"

Works every time.

Diamondindykin
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:42 AM
Hmmmmm....you ladies may be on to something :) Last year I told him that I was going to turn my extra stall into a coop and put a wire run in the paddock. He got this worried look on his face like he knew that I could do that myself without his help :lol: I will have to start organizing the lumber around the farm soon :cool:

Tapperjockey
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:49 AM
See.. most men are problem solvers. So it is crucial to let them help solve a problem. Just saying you'd like chickens isn't a problem to solve. But by badly going about building a run and coop, you are giving him a problem to solve!!

Diamondindykin
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:57 AM
Your right :yes: I just keep telling him I want chickens and ducks but to him that is just adding more animals to the farm..........I must change my tactics:yes:

Sorry for hijacking this thread:)

Calvincrowe
Mar. 15, 2012, 01:12 AM
Ooh! Tapperjockey, you are a genius!

Diamondindykin- Honestly, a garden shed-like structure, and a wire run isn't that expensive, and with Tapper's genius, you should have one up in no time!

Check Freecycle or CL for coops, too. Use 8 foot posts for your coop fence. How many chickens are you talking--10? I have a coop built under the loft stairs in my barn (they run up the east, or long wall opposite the stalls) with a hole cut to the outside chicken run, which parallels the barn wall and is 8 x 20. That, in turn, opens out to the old goat pen, a large grass paddock with 1 x 2 x 8foot tall wire fencing, so they have a pasture all their own. It was cheap to build (simply framed in the stairs with found wood and added a wire filled window and a door.). Harry Potter's Chicken House!

2DogsFarm
Mar. 15, 2012, 08:04 AM
:D Still brainstorming:

Around here they have rent-to-own buildings - small barn-like structures perfect for a coop.

Attaching a run is just sinking posts & stapling chicken wire to them.
I roofed my run with deer netting to keep out hawks.
To do it right you trench the chicken wire about a foot down into the ground so things can't dig in.
I didn't do this, but did leave an apron of chicken wire about a foot out from the bottom of the fence for the same reason.
Grass grows right through this apron & so far I haven't had a problem mowing over it.

Love the Tom Sawyer approach to building it yourself :lol:

Daydream Believer
Mar. 15, 2012, 08:26 AM
Portable electric netting is the bomb for protecting your birds while they forage. I move it around every few weeks to a fresh spot and drag their coop, which is build on skids, with them in it. I just close it up that night and don't let them out the following morning I plan to move them.

Diamondindykin
Mar. 15, 2012, 12:28 PM
I am thinking something similar to this (size wise):

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-woods-family-egg-shack



Just checked on CL and this is what is around here for $675:eek::eek::eek:

http://bellingham.craigslist.org/grd/2882873153.html

Bacardi1
Mar. 15, 2012, 01:08 PM
While the Backyard Chickens coop is lovely, I have one disagreement with it - the height of the building from the ground.

I learned the hard way that a chicken coop too close to the ground - or even flush to the ground - is an open invitation to a very destructive future rodent problem.

For our coop in NY, my father & husband did what we all thought was a fabulous job building a lovely coop sided with real cedar shakes, asphalt shingled roof, glass window, etc., etc. Problem was that instead of situating it well off the ground, we built it on a 6"-8" thick poured concrete slab, which we thought was great. And it was for a few years. But then one day we noticed a small hole at the base, & shortly discovered we had a major rat problem on our hands. All attempts at eradicating the little buggers were for nothing, because as soon as we'd get rid of one group, another would move in - especially because the coop was situated next to a wooded area, plus we lived next to the water, always rodent attractants. Anyway, eventually the rodents managed to do so much tunneling under the concrete slab that it eventually collapsed.

And someone I knew who had a coop a few inches off the ground like the pictured one had rats go underneath & actually chew holes through the coop floor to gain access. That was almost as ugly as my coop base collapsing.

I'd love to have chickens again, but next time I do any coop-building, it will be set on pilings a minimum of 18" off the ground. This is a definite rodent deterrant, as they like small, dark, close spaces; it also increases your run space because if properly fenced off, the chickens can use the space underneath the coop - which is particularly nice in hot or nasty weather.

Shine
Mar. 15, 2012, 02:17 PM
Hmmmmm....you ladies may be on to something :) Last year I told him that I was going to turn my extra stall into a coop and put a wire run in the paddock. He got this worried look on his face like he knew that I could do that myself without his help :lol: I will have to start organizing the lumber around the farm soon :cool:


Since he doesn't want chickens in the spare stall - tell you'll just get an extra horse to put in there. Might dramatically improve your odds on getting chicken housing....:D

JB
Mar. 15, 2012, 03:42 PM
Bacardi, that's awesome info to have about how high to put the base :yes: I'm on the verge of getting a few chickens, so of course need to get something built, and might not have taken that into account :)