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View Full Version : Truck Replaced Rotor, now Wheel Bearing bad???



aspenlucas
Mar. 10, 2012, 11:08 PM
I took my pulling truck to get inspected. $1100 later....new ball joints on my passenger side, left front rotor replaced, new tail pipe and new muffler.

So I bring it home. Let it sit two days and then drive to work on Friday. On the way I feel something underneath me. Vibration while driving, brake and it's gone. Call the mechanic I'm taking it in after work.

So on the way home it's getting really bad, I call my husband and he's meeting me 1/2 way home (at the new house). We get there and he and our friend the contractor take it out. They agree it's in my wheel.

I limp home with it, hubby following and the mechanic takes it out (along with us). We got about 1/2 mile and come home. He lifts it up, thinks it's the drive shaft. Turns out it's not. Calls me 3 hours later it's my wheel bearing. Same side as the rotor.

From what I'm reading if they do not replace the hub nut, it can cause the bearing to go bad. I've never had a bearing go from being fine to that loud in 90 miles. I have not called him back yet. Any input?

ReSomething
Mar. 11, 2012, 09:57 AM
Not on your issue, but lately I've had trouble with mechanics not seeing the forest for the trees - car had a wobble, a really bad jumping tire I thought, so back to the tire store to have tires rebalanced. Tires less than two months old BTW.
Front end had a bad bushing so $200 and a new bushing, drove it about, oh, that magic 90 miles, and it was if anything worse. Turned out rotor was warped so new brakes needed for another $600 (and they gave me my employer's discount to get that price to boot).

Car runs fine now but I am still scratching my head about why there is this lag time before the next thing fails- do things loosen up or something?

Belg
Mar. 12, 2012, 07:28 AM
Car runs fine now but I am still scratching my head about why there is this lag time before the next thing fails- do things loosen up or something?

There is nothing in this world that can cause an out-of-spec part from failing faster than a fresh, in-spec part right next to it. I'm sure there's a scientific reason for it :=)

EventingJ
Mar. 12, 2012, 08:55 AM
Sounds like the wheel bearing may have been bad to begin with - Our old malibu had issues with a little noise, that got better with a rotor and brake change, but the rotor kept "going bad" - we thought it was just defective, until we finally figured out the underlying cause was the bad wheel bearing.

Frank B
Mar. 12, 2012, 09:50 AM
If he replaced the rotor and reused the old bearings, he could have damaged them when removing the from old rotor or installing in them in the new rotor. Or, he could have installed new bearings and forgotten to lube them. It's also possible the bearing tension was not set properly.
Lots of ways to screw up here.

aspenlucas
Mar. 14, 2012, 04:49 PM
Sounds like the wheel bearing may have been bad to begin with - Our old malibu had issues with a little noise, that got better with a rotor and brake change, but the rotor kept "going bad" - we thought it was just defective, until we finally figured out the underlying cause was the bad wheel bearing.

If the bearing was bad on Tuesday when it was inspected and the rotor replaced, would they not have noticed that? I mean inspection cost me $1,100, it's not like they didn't fine tooth comb the truck. Then the truck sits and the next drive it goes from a vibration to wheel almost off in 90 miles?

EventingJ
Mar. 15, 2012, 08:51 AM
hmm... I'm not sure. I know my car had a bad bearing that went undiagnosed for maybe two years - the brakes wore unevenly and faster than normal, there was sometimes a slight shutter when stopping, the rotor went bad twice on that wheel and then a brand new brake pad sheered in half before finally someone diagnosed it as a bad bearing.

My truck had a bad bearing and they diagnosed that pretty quickly without any of those problems (I just noticed noise/vibration at certain speeds).