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View Full Version : Show me your homemade roundbale feeders with roofs please



Couture TB
Mar. 9, 2012, 12:23 PM
Hubby and I love the hayhuts but just can't afford one right now. Soo I was wondering if anyone has built their own roundbale feeder that has a roof on it and would be not only willing to share pictures but how they did it and what it cost. We use the Cinch nets which are great, but shoe season is upon us and they are not suppose to be used without feeders with shoes on, and there is no room for a feeder under the shelter. Cinch net bale yes. Bale in feeder No. So it will have to have a roof so that it doesn't get rained on.

Reagan
Mar. 9, 2012, 12:41 PM
My parents built these (http://i822.photobucket.com/albums/zz149/Reagan511/roundbalefeeder.jpg) this past fall. They have been great, it is easy to put a round bale in with the tractor or roll one in by hand, and it has actually cut down on round bale bullying because the posts section the feeder off. My dad and fiance were able to build these themselves so it only cost the price of materials. Materials are in no way cheap, though!

Couture TB
Mar. 9, 2012, 12:43 PM
My parents built these (http://i822.photobucket.com/albums/zz149/Reagan511/roundbalefeeder.jpg) this past fall. They have been great, it is easy to put a round bale in with the tractor or roll one in by hand, and it has actually cut down on round bale bullying because the posts section the feeder off. My dad and fiance were able to build these themselves so it only cost the price of materials. Materials are in no way cheap, though!

Is that set in the ground? That was one of the things we were thinking of was building a shelter over a feeder.

Thanks for posting! And yes, materials are not cheap. Sadly :lol:

Reagan
Mar. 9, 2012, 12:47 PM
Yep, they are set about 3-4 feet into the ground and then just tamped in, but could be set in concrete if you REALLY wanted them to stay there ;). So far it has been working great. Even with all of the rain we have gotten the round bales have stayed dry :)

trubandloki
Mar. 9, 2012, 12:50 PM
Mr. Trub built This (http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/trubandloki/2012-01-299512-17-1295410.jpg) hay feeder for our herd this fall. It has a round bale in a Cinch Chix (http://www.cinchchix.com/about-the-cinch-products.html) small hole hay net in it.

Here (http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/trubandloki/100_1067.jpg) is it working in a snow storm.

Couture TB
Mar. 9, 2012, 01:58 PM
Mr. Trub built This (http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/trubandloki/2012-01-299512-17-1295410.jpg) hay feeder for our herd this fall. It has a round bale in a Cinch Chix (http://www.cinchchix.com/about-the-cinch-products.html) small hole hay net in it.

Here (http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/trubandloki/100_1067.jpg) is it working in a snow storm.

Is that technically portable? And your hubby doesn't happen to want to share how he built it and what it cost with my hubby does he? I actually think I saw that picture when I was googling for photos and ideas/directions

trubandloki
Mar. 9, 2012, 02:31 PM
:eek: <--- that my little photo would come up on google.

I can ask Mr. Trub how much it cost. I have no idea. He has access to sheet metal and a break so the roof was made not purchased.

If you send me your email address I can send you photos of the building process. Guessing your hubby can figure it out from those.

The feeder is not attached to the ground. It is 100% moveable. The spot where it sits is my (very small) riding area during the not winter months.
It has gotten some pretty serious wind testing too. We stuck it in the windiest part of the property, with out a round bale in it, for a couple of weeks before it was moved into the horse's area. It stayed upright.

WildBlue
Mar. 9, 2012, 06:34 PM
My parents built these (http://i822.photobucket.com/albums/zz149/Reagan511/roundbalefeeder.jpg) this past fall.

We're planning to do something very similar this summer for the cows. I already have two spots picked out, and my dad has locust trees that'll make great posts for the corners. Given how well the cowies already snuggle up to their bale ring, they should be pretty happy. Hubby is also excited, since they ought to make nice deer stands.

The horses have big, rubber-matted run-ins with bale feeders inside and have made it clear they don't intend to share.

2bee
Mar. 9, 2012, 08:11 PM
Your bales last long enough to need a roof?

Couture TB
Mar. 10, 2012, 10:21 AM
Your bales last long enough to need a roof?

I don't like them to even get a light rain on them. Right now they are under the shelters. A bale lasts one horse a month. So it all depends on the amount of horses turned out. Right now we now have 4 going to be 5 out together so they will not last as long as before :lol:

trubandloki
Mar. 10, 2012, 10:45 AM
Your bales last long enough to need a roof?

Our weather has been so wet with temperatures swinging from well below freezing to into the 40s or 50s I just figure keeping it some what protected is better than letting it get ruined.


With three horses and the small hole hay net a round bale is lasting me 2 weeks this year. Last year same horses, same size bales, no feeder and no net lasted me barely a week. Much less waste this way.

WildBlue
Mar. 10, 2012, 11:35 AM
Nah, I just thought it'd be fun to spend some extra money... Horse people have gobs, you know.

Seriously, though, it rains AND the ground is wet enough half the year that--even feeding 10 head--I have to be careful so the hay doesn't get funky and mildew. I'm supplementing quite a lot of pasture, so it's not like anything is stuffing its face full of hay 24/7 except a day or two here and there when the weather is completely rotten.