PDA

View Full Version : Care of paddock boots?



Mukluk
Mar. 5, 2012, 11:37 PM
Sorry to say I have neglected my leather paddock boots but I now want to make up for lost time. I have a new pair coming and I am going to be a better mom to them. The problem I encounter is that no matter how clean/conditioned I get them at home. The are a virtual dust/dirt magnet at the barn. Obviously I don't want to put any sort of leather treatment on them that is going to just mix with the dust. So any advice? Wet rag to get the dust off and then condition? Any way to get the dust off without getting the boot wet or damp? Thanks in advance.

ElisLove
Mar. 6, 2012, 12:55 AM
When I bought my most recent tall boots they said never to use leather cleaner or conditioner on them b/c they were designed for tack not for boots. She said to wipe with water if need be then polish with boot polish. Not sure if that translates to paddock boots. I virtually don't ever clean or do anything with my paddock boots except maybe spray off any mud that might bet on them (obviously not getting inside the boot)

fourmares
Mar. 6, 2012, 01:32 AM
At least once a week clean them with a damp sponge and a little glycerine if needed. Then polish them with boot polish. Polish repells dirt and water.

Rel6
Mar. 6, 2012, 01:35 AM
I'm sure I've done all the wrong things, but I completely TRASH my boots. The looked about two minutes away from the garbage...

Then I had to make a desperate attempt to spiff them up as my tall boots hadn't come yet and I was trying horses. I washed all the dirt off with a soft sponge, oiled them, and once they were dry I polished them. They looked great and felt super soft. I've had them for about five or six years and they're still going strong!

fordtraktor
Mar. 6, 2012, 08:59 AM
To me, paddock boots are useless if I have to polish them and only put them on to ride. I might as well just use tall boots if I'm going to all that trouble!

I think dust and grime offer a wonderful protective layer for paddock boots. I had my last pair for 15 years and just replaced the laces a few times. Everyone who pampers them seems to need a new pair every year or so....so I highly recommend benign neglect.

After all, when you see a cow in the field, it is almost always muddy, dirty and has some poop smeared on it. Perhaps leather does best in its natural state.... :lol:

skittlespony
Mar. 6, 2012, 09:13 AM
To me, paddock boots are useless if I have to polish them and only put them on to ride. I might as well just use tall boots if I'm going to all that trouble!

I think dust and grime offer a wonderful protective layer for paddock boots. I had my last pair for 15 years and just replaced the laces a few times. Everyone who pampers them seems to need a new pair every year or so....so I highly recommend benign neglect.

After all, when you see a cow in the field, it is almost always muddy, dirty and has some poop smeared on it. Perhaps leather does best in its natural state.... :lol:

:lol: Hahahahaha as much as I find this post Hilarious (especially the last couple sentences about the cow) I have to completely agree. I have had my current pair of paddock boots going on 5-6 years and they look great, I could probably use them for another 5 or 6 more. I also have a pair of tall boots that I use for hacking and lessoning that I have never cleaned. They are dusty, dirty and kinda gross looking. But they do look as though I haven't had them for long, this is their third year. These boots will last forever. I have to say I completely agree with this.

Although I would never let me monaco's get nearly as gross as these, I have to wipe down those babies till I can see my face in them before and after every show. :D

BAC
Mar. 6, 2012, 11:08 AM
I frequently wear those Tingley rubbers on my paddock boots, they are especially helpful for bathing, and mine last for years, my oldest are 10 years old and still going strong. I remove them for riding, if I remember. And even if I don't wear them, I let the mud dry on them when I come home and then brush it off with a stiff brush and wipe with a damp cloth. Every few weeks I will polish with Meltonian leather cream, or just give them a good buffing with a shoe brush (after removing any dirt). I have several pair of Grand Prix and Ariat paddock boots and despite all the complaints I hear about Ariat paddocks, mine are all in great shape. It only takes a few minutes to keep them looking nice. Water, urine and manure are not helpful to maintaining leather.

comingback
Mar. 6, 2012, 12:03 PM
I usually give mine a quick wipe down with a damp sponge as part of my after ride tack cleaning process to remove dirt, mud, poop, whatever else I happened to step in.... Every once in a while I will polish them (like maybe twice a year) with a Kiwi wax polish. I feel like that helps give a protective barrier and the crap come off easier.

I've had these paddock boots for 2 years now with no issue. I have had other pairs longer using this method and they have held up fine.

northerhunter
Mar. 6, 2012, 01:24 PM
Wear them, wear them some more. If they look really crusty and gross, and mud caked on about an inch thick....walk through a puddle or hose them off.

Or.... forget to take them off at the barn, bring them home, have your mother complain about how nasty they are, and wait for her to get fed up, tell her they are supposed to be dirty and gross, and she may clean them herself ;)

gottagrey
Mar. 6, 2012, 01:33 PM
Mud is a boot's worst enemy - so if you need to walk out into muddy paddocks/fields - then invest in a pair of rubber boots to use - then put on the paddocks. same thing for bathing horse; paddocks are fine for a quick rinse off; also the tingley boot covers are great but you should take them off when it's not wet or muddy. Otherwise clean/ wipe them off w/ a damp rag or sponge; polish & condition every so often. I'm with the others, sometimes the more cleaner, condition etc you use on leather the sooner stuff wears out. I'm about 10 years now in my waterproof Ariat paddocks

jay0087
Mar. 6, 2012, 04:55 PM
I have killed three pairs of ariat boots in two years. I do not clean stalls in them and really dont walk through mud and I dont ride but a few times a week. The stiching that goes across the front of the boot on the outside of my boots falls apart! I dont go crazy with cleaning them but I do clean them here and there.

I am getting a different pair of ariats this time and even going with a mens boot to give me more width. Hope they hold up better than the last three pairs.

ParadoxFarm
Mar. 6, 2012, 07:15 PM
I've gone through several pairs of Ariats that I didn't take real good care of. I have a pair now that have a big crack in the leather on the inside of the ball of the foot. So I just keep a pair of spurs permanently attached to those and use them in this crappy weather when the ground is a mess. My new ones, I will admit that I wipe them down with damp sponge and sometimes horseman's Onestep. Then I store them in a spare soft helmet bag. They fit perfectly!

Mukluk
Mar. 7, 2012, 12:08 AM
Thanks for all the responses. The boots in question have taken all manner of abuse. Including being totally submerged in water whilst riding through deep rivers and in the ocean. And plenty of water slopped on them at horsie bath time etc. That they are still alive is really something. I thing the best compromise for me will be to clean and condition them once a week. I have downgraded to a less expensive paddock boot (under $100.00) because I can't see abusing an expensive pair the way these ones have been abused. I will try to be a better "paddock boot mother" in the future.

PaintedHunter
Mar. 7, 2012, 09:56 AM
I've had these for almost two years and have literally never cleaned them. Still going strong! Only thing wrong with them is that the zipper is malfunctioning in one boot, so I am debating getting the zipper replaced or just getting a different pair, since these are relatively inexpensive.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/ariat%c2%ae-heritage-sport-zip-paddock%3f-boot/p/X1-38195/

Mukluk
Mar. 7, 2012, 11:14 PM
My new ones are a pair of dublins that were under $100. I have this strong need to have leather on the majority of the boot so those ariats wouldn't do for me. These are the ones I'm getting. I hope they work out. I will try very hard to take good care of them!

http://www.doversaddlery.com/dublin-rcs-assurance-zip-padck/p/X1-38846/

Electrikk
Mar. 8, 2012, 09:48 PM
If I have mud caked on my boots, I'll scrape it off, or if it gets all caught up in the zipper I might actually *gasp* clean them, but that's pretty much the extent of my boot care.
Also, whenever I need new laces, I cross them over the opposite way that they cross before. So if the outside crossed over inside before, with the new laces the inside will cross over the outside. I've heard it helps keep shoes from warping. No idea if it actually does anything, but it doesn't hurt.

lucyeq
Mar. 8, 2012, 09:54 PM
My old paddocks lasted five years. I just oy new ones because the sole started ripping off. I do everything in my paddocks and abuse them severely. They get a quick scrub with saddle soap if I think about it while cleaning tack. Other than that, the hose works wonders.

DMK
Mar. 8, 2012, 10:03 PM
I think my paddock boots are 6 years old and I just took them in to be resoled. That's a record for me, and an even more impressive one if you knew how hard I was on shoes (toed in and pronate out on right - plays hell on shoes).

I turned over a new leaf and mended my boot abusing ways and it has paid off big time. I do a few simple things:

Put them on to ride and take them off BEFORE I take the horse to the washrack.
NEVER put tack cleaning stuff (glycerine, etc.) on my boots.
Take a stiff brush to clean the edge between the boot and the welt
Wipe them off with a damp sponge
2-3 times a year I remember to bring them home and polish them when I'm polishing my tall boots.
Usually one of those times I will do a boot conditioner as well.

The last 2 are the least important, the first 4 will make your boots last, however they are also the hardest things to do.