PDA

View Full Version : therapeutic riding program?



Tiffany01
Mar. 4, 2012, 08:12 PM
I have a ? now it's just a ? im not planing on doing this lol. Do YOU think Beautiful would be suited for a therapeutic riding program?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioARvcfKkXU&context=C3433cf4ADOEgsToPDskKlAmNkZDgJG9pPDeD39Nh8
with my mom. Video was last fall.

AmmyByNature
Mar. 4, 2012, 10:49 PM
Are you thinking of getting rid of Beautiful?

cadance
Mar. 4, 2012, 10:53 PM
Its hard to tell how a horse will do with a leader by her head and one or two sidewalkers, but she seems like a very steady easygoing horse willing to pack your mom around. I think she would be a candidate for a therapeutic riding program for sure. Most places do a trial period of a month+ to assess each horse when they come in after an initial evaluation.

ElisLove
Mar. 4, 2012, 11:26 PM
That horse looks very lame in that video.

Jumpthemoon16
Mar. 4, 2012, 11:29 PM
That horse looks very lame in that video.

.

MySuperExAlter
Mar. 4, 2012, 11:45 PM
She does look a bit off to me also.. It's hard to say how well a horse would do in a therapeutic program until they are put into that situation. I used to volunteer at a stable that did that, and the horses had to be completely bomb proof to wheel chairs, walkers, noise etc. They had to be very gentle and calm and have a good sense of where the kids were when they were on the ground next to them etc.. Remember also, a lot of the riders that would be riding are unable to support themselves, they need people on both sides to hold them on. There's a lot that goes into a great therapeutic horse.

Rel6
Mar. 5, 2012, 12:16 AM
I volunteered for a therapeutic riding program, and it is hard to tell. The basic requirement is bombproof, bombproof, bombproof. They cannot be spooked, rattled, or upset by anything. If they stroll around on a long rein at a busy horse show where they might encounter dogs, leases, loud children, umbrellas, gold carts, walkers, wheelchairs, etc. and don't bat an eye, you might have something. Of course, some of our horses had never really shown but they had the most placid nature you've ever seen.

An under saddle video doesn't help much. One of the horses we used was difficult to ride...hard mouth, pulled, swapped off, just not an easy horse. He was mean in a stall as well. But you could have had a tornado tear the indoor ring right off of him and he wouldn't have batted an eye. Once he was out of his stall he was a sweetheart, and he was very aware of a shifting rider on his back.

It takes all types...I've seen amazing therapeutic horses who I wouldn't have pegged to be that calm and patient, and then I've seen some super super easy horses who would never have be suitable.

What does your horse do in a new environment? When she sees something for the first time? A better person to ask would be the head of a therapeutic riding program near you...

FLeventer
Mar. 5, 2012, 12:20 AM
I agree with how off she looks in the hind end. Has a vet been out to do a lameness exam or inject her? If not it is something you may want to consider.

ElisLove
Mar. 5, 2012, 12:21 AM
What does your horse do in a new environment? When she sees something for the first time? A better person to ask would be the head of a therapeutic riding program near you...

Yes but I think that would be wasting the therapeutic riding program person's time as Tiffany is not considering having her horse become a therapeutic riding horse.

Rel6
Mar. 5, 2012, 12:36 AM
Yes but I think that would be wasting the therapeutic riding program person's time as Tiffany is not considering having her horse become a therapeutic riding horse.

Right, but its more than just Tiffany reading these answers and any information might benefit someone who actually is considering it.

TheHorseProblem
Mar. 5, 2012, 01:12 AM
I know they get offers of lame horses all the time, but they actually need for the horses and ponies to be sound. That's not because it's hard work, but because an irregular gait interferes with the balance and muscular development of the riders.

Tiffany01
Mar. 5, 2012, 07:50 AM
ummm guys that video was from the FALL. She JUST had her shoes pulled. She's not lame now. Like EllisLove said im not giving my horse up.

AmmyByNature
Mar. 5, 2012, 08:17 AM
ummm guys that video was from the FALL. She JUST had her shoes pulled. She's not lame now. Like EllisLove said im not giving my horse up.

If you post a video of your horse and it is lame you should expect people to comment on it. Why was your mother riding Beautiful if she was lame?

If you have no intention of donating Beautiful to a program, why did you ask if she was appropriate?

Tiffany01
Mar. 5, 2012, 08:25 AM
God forbid I would ask a ? one here.

furlong47
Mar. 5, 2012, 09:16 AM
I know you mentioned before that Beautiful is too spooky to be a trail horse, so she might not be a good match for a therapeutic program. They do a lot more than just ride around in a ring. I know of programs where they go out on short trails with sidewalkers or play games which involve people throwing balls and other items.

AmmyByNature
Mar. 5, 2012, 09:21 AM
God forbid I would ask a ? one here.

Tiff, don't be so dramatic. Of course you can ask questions. That's what this place is for. But you asked if Beautiful was appropriate for a therapeutic program, posted a video of her being ridden while lame, and then said that you weren't thinking about sending her to a therapeutic program.

If you wanted to know about therapeutic programs, you could have just asked. But if you used a question to which you don't want the answer to simply to post a video of your horse being ridden by your mother. (A video that I believe that you have posted before and had people mention the fact that Beautiful was lame.) Can't you see how that would annoy people? Especially when they try to give you a good answer and good suggestions and you get cranky and yell at them?

If you post photos of you riding Beautiful when she's filthy dirty, you need to not get upset when people tell you you should groom her. If you post videos of people riding Beautiful when she's lame, you need to not get upset when people comment on it.

Laurierace
Mar. 5, 2012, 09:39 AM
Seems to me that she is already doing a sort of therapeutic riding.

MySuperExAlter
Mar. 5, 2012, 09:59 AM
ummm guys that video was from the FALL. She JUST had her shoes pulled. She's not lame now. Like EllisLove said im not giving my horse up.

First off, this video was uploaded in January 2012, so what do you expect us to think? Secondly, why are you asking if you're not giving your horse up? Perhaps you could have made a topic less specific to your horse if you wanted to know the characteristics of a good therapeutic horse, and posted it on a different forum.. not the H/J one...

Cut the snark.

Tiffany01
Mar. 5, 2012, 04:40 PM
Sorry it's a habit....

Yeah,Beautiful does spook on trail rides. I'll get a video when I go to the barn of her in the ring or roundpen.

Tiffany01
Mar. 5, 2012, 04:42 PM
Seems to me that she is already doing a sort of therapeutic riding.

?????? whats your point just becuz im well ya'll know.

Foundgreenergrass
Mar. 5, 2012, 04:50 PM
This whole thread is very strange to me.

AmmyByNature
Mar. 5, 2012, 04:51 PM
Sorry it's a habit....

Yeah,Beautiful does spook on trail rides. I'll get a video when I go to the barn of her in the ring or roundpen.

Why? I mean that honestly -- why would you go get video of her in the ring?

People have told you what is looked for in a therapeutic program horse. You've told us that you have no intention of trying to send Beautiful into such a program.

So there is no need to upload additional video of your horse in this situation.

Ambitious Kate
Mar. 5, 2012, 09:43 PM
No. The horse in the video is not a good candidate for therapeutic riding.

The horse is lame in the video, and the horse has a history of spooking.

You say you knew she was lame (you said it was last fall, so you are aware of last fall's lameness) yet you put your mother, a beginning, unblanced rider on her? Poor judgement.