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View Full Version : Which fencing would you choose?



Flying Hearts
Feb. 28, 2012, 11:27 PM
Ok, I am replacing my entire outer perimeter fencing. This fence blocks one field from 3 neighbors houses on one side, and woods everywhere else. I'm currently tearing down old mesh fencing that I've had to keep an electric tape fence (step in posts) on the inside of since the mesh was fallen down. It's on t-posts. The t-posts are still good and I want to re-use them. I will have to reset some, but overall it'll save me a ton of money!

So I can either put more mesh, or straight electric tape. If I do mesh, I would want at LEAST one strand of electric on the top to keep them from leaning over it and destroying it, and I'm thinking I'd need a strand at the bottom too (we've all seen mesh fences bent out at the bottom from horses pushing on it to get to the "greener grass"). I love that mesh would help keep out dogs, and it might be nice for the neighbors (one has small kids) to not have electric along the back of their yard. As far as price, that right there is mesh, plus two lines of electric, plus caps for all the posts. OR I can do all electric. I would probably buy those pretty sleeves to go over the t-posts, and run 4 lines of electric. I'm thinking the price is about the same for this... it might be slightly more for mesh + 2 electric lines.

Maybe I should do mesh + electric on the neighbor side, and just electric elsewhere?? Or mesh everywhere, because to me it seems harder for a horse to get out of, especially with that electric there too. I've seen horses stick a leg through electric and pull down entire lines, and that would be bad on a perimeter fence (I do have 3 strands of electric for my interior lines). I'm torn and can't decide what to do! Help!

AnotherRound
Feb. 29, 2012, 10:47 AM
I would put up mesh with electric protection top and board reinforcment top and bottom.

fairtheewell
Feb. 29, 2012, 11:10 AM
I'm dealing with a similar situation, and I'm sticking to the mesh (make sure t posts are on the outside of the mesh). High tensile electric works well but needs very sturdy posts and takes more equipment to put up, but the tape stuff often falls down and sags no matter how tight you set it up....deer jump over it and pull it down and your horses leave...lol

Kate66
Feb. 29, 2012, 12:14 PM
If you can afford it make sure it's a good quality non-climb horse mesh and not the mesh with the larger spacing. Make sure that you have many wooden posts between the T-posts - say 1 wooden post to 2-3 T posts. Wooden posts are much more secure and can hold the mesh much tighter than T posts.

I am about to have 2000' of mesh done, with all wooden posts, spaced 10' apart and it's costing me $3.75/foot.

Win1
Feb. 29, 2012, 02:06 PM
We have no climb mesh on t-posts with a stabilized (large wood post with two smaller ones on each side and small posts horizontally between them) wood post about every 400+ft. Then put the white t-post caps on top and one electric rope. Works really well but the dogs will dig under sometimes.

Win1
Feb. 29, 2012, 02:09 PM
If you can afford it make sure it's a good quality non-climb horse mesh and not the mesh with the larger spacing. Make sure that you have many wooden posts between the T-posts - say 1 wooden post to 2-3 T posts. Wooden posts are much more secure and can hold the mesh much tighter than T posts.

I am about to have 2000' of mesh done, with all wooden posts, spaced 10' apart and it's costing me $3.75/foot.

We have mostly t-posts with several well secured wood posts about every 430ft. It's been 12 years and the mesh looks great, no issues.

rmh_rider
Mar. 1, 2012, 09:37 AM
Good fences, make good neighbors.

Mesh. Keeps yours in, and theirs out. Hot wire on top, or inside. Keeps yours away from the fence, and theirs away from the fence to pet or mess with your horses.

Put mesh close to the ground so nobody from either side goes under. Any holes the mesh can't follow along the ground, put a wheel barrow of poop there. Close or on the ground makes it so no dogs dig in or out. Graduated mesh, small to large on top.

If you run a wire on the bottom, you may have to weed eat the fence line regularly to keep the grass from touching the wire.

We spaced our posts 8' apart. Put an H in every 75-100'.

Chestnut Run
Mar. 1, 2012, 09:48 AM
I like Electrobraid, and that's probably all I'll ever install again. To keep dogs out on a perimeter fence, you can use the 6 inch insulators, put it on the OUTSIDE bottom of the fence about 6-8 inches off the ground. It's very unlikely a horse would paw at an electric fence once they know it's electric, and even if they did, they probably wouldn't reach the strand on the outside of the fence.

Someone mentioned high tensile wire. Even electrofied, I would stay away from it. It's hard to see for horses, and if they do by chance run into it or get caught in it, it can be devestating. I know this the hard way. :no:

Sheila

Bluey
Mar. 1, 2012, 09:57 AM
I would not depend on electric fence for perimeter fencing.
Too unreliable.

V mesh is the gold standard, but there are all kinds of mesh fencing that will work fine for horses and to keep most other critters out of your pastures.

katarine
Mar. 1, 2012, 10:20 AM
The V mesh or 2X4 mesh with a top board and a strand of electrified, white hotcote on the inside of the top tail, on the offset insulators so they really truly don't touch your fence.

HappyHorselover
Mar. 1, 2012, 07:18 PM
I LOVE my mesh fence. I have mine on 6" diameter wood posts spaced 8' apart. I also have a board across the top. I don't have dogs come under (neighbors have tons), because there is no room. The damn dogs come through my gates. But that's another story :) High recommend mesh, but I don't know about it if it's all on t-posts. I guess the electric wire on top would keep them off it.

Go Fish
Mar. 2, 2012, 12:47 PM
and I'm thinking I'd need a strand at the bottom too (we've all seen mesh fences bent out at the bottom from horses pushing on it to get to the "greener grass").

I wouldn't put a hot wire close to the ground. Too much risk of a horse accidently getting a foot tangled, they panic when shocked, and all hell breaks loose.

I'm a mesh person with board top and bottom and use wood posts. I hot wire the top. I use the longer insulators and put them on the inside of the top board, nailing them to the wood posts, so the horses don't approach the fence at all.

It's a bit more expensive, but the board top and bottom allows you to pull the mesh tight and keeps it from sagging.