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Crazy-Pony
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:02 AM
I got Bat Mitzvahed this past weekend and am think that I will use some of the money I received to buy my first pair of tall boots. First, though, I have a few (stupid) questions:

Can I keep my tights?
I have a few pairs of Kerrits-type either summer or winter tights that I school in and wear around the barn Can I use these will tall boots?

How do I break them in?
I have heard of the bathtub method, but am not sure I want to do that. What if it ruins my boots? Can I break in my new boots by just wearing them around the house?

How do I store them?
Do I need a tall boot bag? Or can I just place them in my tack trunk?

FLeventer
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:10 AM
Yes you can keep your tights. I ride in them with my tall boots all the time in the summer. Hopefully your boots are not full calf because if you plan on rriding in them everyday they will wear out fast.

Breaking in I use the bathtub method. Well really the hose method. Hose down the inside of boot while on and them walk in them all day till dry. Only boots I do not use this with a re calf skin boots. Those need almost no break in time. If you are not comfortable with the bathtub method there are a ton of threads on here about breaking in boots. Never use neatsfoot oil though. They will never shine again.

I use a fleece lined boot bag to keep them clean and carry them around. Its a good investment for me. Some come with bags and covers others do not. They are cheap to buy so why not.

hequestrian
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:12 AM
Well I am a little bit older than you (21) but I still wear my Kerrits tights all the time. I dont show in them but they are my daily riding pants. I have had mine for years.

As for breaking them in... I normally just walk around in mine a TON. I know kids at the barn I ride at that wear theirs under their jeans to school. (but boots are trendy so with skinny jeans you could even pull it off that way :) ) Then I just bite the bullet and ride in mine. I have never gotten blisters but sometimes my ankles hurt a bit at first until the leather gets more flexible.

I don't keep my tall boots in a boot bag but I probably don't care for mine the way that I should- ie. I don't clean them after every ride because I use them every day. But I know a lot of people that do keep theirs in a boot bag and it would probably encourage you to clean and properly care for them.

sarcam02
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:12 AM
Mazel Tov!

Yes you can wear your tights with tall boots to practice.

Breaking in - First try just wearing them. Boots of today are typically very easy to break in. Bathtub is for more serious break in issues IMHO

You can store them however you want but if you want them to last and stay pristine I would use boot trees and a boot bag. Enjoy!

2DogsFarm
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:16 AM
Congrats on your Bat Mitzvah :D

No such thing as a stooopid question :no:

#1 - you s/b able to wear your tights under the tall boots. you may need to wear thin boot socks (like Zox) outside the tights to get the boots to slip on easily.

#2 - I never used this method either.
Just wearing your boots will help break them in. You need the ankle to drop and the back of the boot shaft where it hits the back of your knee will soften and drop a bit too. Otherwise the boots should feel comfortable - if stiff - until they get broken in.

Are you getting custom boots?
If so, the foot part should be totally comfortable from Day One. If they don't feel like bedroom slippers they were not measured correctly & need to go back.
The shafts do take time to break in, soften & fit you perfectly.

#3 - Get boot trees AND a bag to store them in if you will be leaving them in your trunk. Better to store them where they can stand upright w/boot trees inside.
And don't get the boot trees that just fill the shaft - get the ones with "feet"

Renn/aissance
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:24 AM
Mazel tov! You'll want a pair of proper breeches to show, but your tights are fine for schooling. Your boots should break in fairly easily by just wearing them around. Calf boots break in faster than those of more durable leathers, but inexpensive calf boots also tend to wear out faster, so keep that in mind when making your choice. Wear a band-aid on your heel and your ankles to prevent blisters and you should be just fine. When done using them, wipe them off with a damp rag and store them with boot trees in a boot bag. I actually hang my boot bag upside-down to fight gravity collapsing the ankles.

BAC
Feb. 27, 2012, 11:35 AM
Better to store them where they can stand upright w/boot trees inside.

Best way to store is with boot trees and lying down, which helps minimize drooping due to gravity.

Congratulations.

altjaeger
Feb. 27, 2012, 12:05 PM
The bath tub method is for use on boots that are a little too tight in the calf. I would never do this for boots that aren't too tight. Break them in by riding in them. It will only take a few rides.

NSRider
Feb. 27, 2012, 12:46 PM
Some brands will break in a lot quicker/easier than others, depending on the leather used. I bought my first pair of boots back in September, and with walking around in them and biting the bullet and riding, they broke in in no time with no blisters/pain!

Invest in some boot trees and a bag, will help keep your boots looking great for a very long time. If you can't find the trees with feet, keep the shaped paper that comes with the boots that are inserted in the feet portion. I still have mine, along with a pair of shaft boot trees and they have kept their shape quite nicely. Once the paper dies, I'll get the feet+shaft boot trees.

Rel6
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:25 PM
Also, don't chuck your paddocks boots and half chaps! Chances are, once you break in your tallboots you'll want to save them for shows if you can. If you only have one pair of tallboots and you're riding in them everyday, they are not going to last as long.

Hunter Mom
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:45 PM
I can't add much, but congratulations on your big milestone!!

Buy the most comfortable boots you can. In a perfect world, we'd want to ride in ours. Also remember that riding boots aren't necessarily meant to be walking boots, either. Mine are super comfy to ride in, but I cannot stand to have them on any more than a few minutes out of the saddle. Get some good leather conditioner to work into the ankles to help break them in, too.

Oh, and check out a boot bag that matches your coat bag. And your helmet bag. It will protect them and future pairs for many years to come. And because it'll be a fun way to remember your special day.

JohnGalt
Feb. 28, 2012, 10:24 PM
First off, mazel tov! I don't have an opinion on tights (sorry) but as far as breaking in, I guess it depends. If they are custom, they should already fit properly so just wear them . . . a lot! The bath tub/hose method is really applicable if they don't exactly fit and need a little stretch or shrink. Keeping them in bags is nice. Trees are important. Your boots will drop (you should buy them taller than you need because they will drop as they break in) and boot trees will help minimize that. Hope this helps.

Crazy-Pony
Mar. 11, 2012, 10:50 AM
Alright, the boots came! I got a pair of Mountain Horse's Venice Field Boots and they are wonderful, but I have two more questions...

How do I polish them?
With my paddock boots, I would simply wipe off any dried dirt/mud with a barely damp sponge, then apple some Kiwi Color Shine, and then buff. Will this routine work for my new boots?

Does Mountain Horse make polish/conditioner?
If yes, is it any better than other products? I haven't put anything on the boots yet, other then some Leather Therapy Wash to get the waxy stuff off, and then a very, very, VERY thin layer of Leather Therapy Conditioner. I buffed with an old T-shirt after.


Thanks again!

Libby416
Mar. 30, 2012, 08:11 AM
Mazel Tov on your Bat Miztvah!! I remember mine like it was yesterday...

You can polish them that way but my suggestion is , depending on where you live, bring them to a boot man to polish for the first time, and have him show you the products he feels would bring out the shine the best in your particular boot. He can also show you some pointers about shining the boots!

No they don't, unfortunately. I use this though, with awesome results on my Mountain Horse Supremes.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/urad-boot-cleaner-50ml/p/X1-3772/

GingerJumper
Mar. 30, 2012, 09:06 AM
Mazel tov on your bat mitzvah! That's a big milestone :)

I wear my tights under my tall boots all the time. However, once you break in your boots, you'll probably still want to school in paddock boots and half chaps and save the tall boots for shows, so I wouldn't toss the short boots and chaps.

For polish/conditioning, I've always used Passier Lederbalsam. I don't find it dulls the boots at all and it keeps them supple. It's expensive but worth it and a tub of it will last a while.

horsegal301
Mar. 30, 2012, 09:37 AM
Can I steal a part of this thread while it's nice and hot?

I have a new pair of boots that are pretty okay to ride in, but the ankles are still killing me. They dropped quite a bit - I'm short and they're the perfect height now, but it seems as if there's just so much in the ankle, or the way the dropped ankle is, is just TOO much. I know the bathtub method is used to stretch the boots out, so how can I effectively just soften the ankles without making them loose?

Any advice is greatly appreciated from those boot gurus.

kashmere
Mar. 30, 2012, 09:47 AM
Can I steal a part of this thread while it's nice and hot?

I have a new pair of boots that are pretty okay to ride in, but the ankles are still killing me. They dropped quite a bit - I'm short and they're the perfect height now, but it seems as if there's just so much in the ankle, or the way the dropped ankle is, is just TOO much. I know the bathtub method is used to stretch the boots out, so how can I effectively just soften the ankles without making them loose?

Any advice is greatly appreciated from those boot gurus.

On the inside of your boot...like the actual interior where your foot and leg (and more importantly, your ankle!) goes, rub a small amount of leather conditioner (lederbalsam, leather cream, whatever you use) into the ankle. This should help soften them up without risking the finish on the outside of the boot. Make sure you wear junky breeches/socks afterward, as some conditioner may bleed onto them.

sarcam02
Mar. 30, 2012, 11:16 AM
Alright, the boots came! I got a pair of Mountain Horse's Venice Field Boots and they are wonderful, but I have two more questions...

How do I polish them?
With my paddock boots, I would simply wipe off any dried dirt/mud with a barely damp sponge, then apple some Kiwi Color Shine, and then buff. Will this routine work for my new boots?

Does Mountain Horse make polish/conditioner?
If yes, is it any better than other products? I haven't put anything on the boots yet, other then some Leather Therapy Wash to get the waxy stuff off, and then a very, very, VERY thin layer of Leather Therapy Conditioner. I buffed with an old T-shirt after.


Thanks again!

Yay!! We have those exact boots - I personally would not use any polish with a "ready made shine" Thay build up and are not good in the long (or short) term in my opinion. We care for boots as follows:

Wipe off excess dirt/mud with damp rag
I clean if needed with a bit of glycerine/sponge and very little water(as you have mentioned)

Then I use a healthy layer (which builds in a good way over time) of wax based polish (Kiwi in the tin) in the outside and top of the boots. I avoid the inside where it meets the saddle pad or inside. Let that polish dry

Next I use a horsehair shoe brush to buff and get my base shine. Last, I take an old pair of stocking and buff the heck out of the boots. I make my kids put them on and run the hose left to right while they are wearing them. You should end up with a mirror like shine

Crazy-Pony
Mar. 30, 2012, 07:39 PM
Yay!! We have those exact boots - I personally would not use any polish with a "ready made shine" Thay build up and are not good in the long (or short) term in my opinion. We care for boots as follows:

Wipe off excess dirt/mud with damp rag
I clean if needed with a bit of glycerine/sponge and very little water(as you have mentioned)

Then I use a healthy layer (which builds in a good way over time) of wax based polish (Kiwi in the tin) in the outside and top of the boots. I avoid the inside where it meets the saddle pad or inside. Let that polish dry

Next I use a horsehair shoe brush to buff and get my base shine. Last, I take an old pair of stocking and buff the heck out of the boots. I make my kids put them on and run the hose left to right while they are wearing them. You should end up with a mirror like shine


Thanks for the reply! I have a show tomorrow and used the Leather CPR Boot Polish and it worked wonderfully. I first cleaned the gunky stuff on the boots with a barley damp sponge and then applied the Leather CPR to the outsides only (someone told me it is bad for boot and saddle health, grip, and will squeak!) and then buffed; first with a rag, then with a soft piece of fleece.

The boots sure are shiny now! :)