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skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 12:56 AM
In the show ring, I like to stand out so people will notice my riding (sometimes that's good, other times... not so much) the way I have always wanted to do this is through show coats. Not some crazy, custom made expensive one, but the ones that you make yourself. (As in, buy some cloth from the store and a showcoat pattern, sit down to a sewing machine, and viola a show coat) (after a few hours of labor). What I'm looking for is peoples ideas/photos of really awesome/nicely colored showcoats. Things that will make people be like "wow, that coat it awesome!" And make the judges say "oh, you are that girl with the pretty coat! I remember you." Here are some of my ideas...
BlueGreen with blue pinstriped showshirt
plum coat, ??? Shirt

Etc, etc. This is just another random thought I had, but I thought it would make a good thread. Show/tell me the beautiful, the crazy, the "wtf was that person thinking?!?!?!" (Although of course I would never make the last two of those categories...)

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 12:57 AM
This is kind of a spinoff of the thread about the pepto-bismol-pink coat

SugarAndSpite
Feb. 27, 2012, 01:07 AM
I personally have a coat that is a really deep plum/burgundy with a sheen that makes it look black in certain light... I've never quite had the guts to wear it though ;)

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 01:11 AM
I personally have a coat that is a really deep plum/burgundy with a sheen that makes it look black in certain light... I've never quite had the guts to wear it though ;)

I would wear that:yes::cool:yes::

hequestrian
Feb. 27, 2012, 01:14 AM
Do you have any pictures of stuff you have made before? I am very interested to see some of your creations- I cannot sew for my life so... Of the rack for me it is.

HobbyHorse101
Feb. 27, 2012, 05:14 PM
I'm personally getting a black & pink pinstripe shirt made to go with my black coat & a very shiny white eq shirt.

I've always wanted a tan coat with leopard lining.....

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 06:09 PM
I haven't actually made anything yet, but I'm going to order some patterns from Sew and Saddle up (unless anyone knows of another company that's better) then hit the fabric store and my sewing machine. I saw in another thread a picture of someone who had a tan/dark brown plaid show coat and a pink shirt. So pretty! I guess that's what started this whole show coat thing for me.

... not to sound shallow or anything

kmwines01
Feb. 27, 2012, 06:11 PM
It wasn't too crazy, but I had this gorgeous lighter brown coat that I paired with a deep red colored shirt. I absolutely loved the combo.

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 06:14 PM
It wasn't too crazy, but I had this gorgeous lighter brown coat that I paired with a deep red colored shirt. I absolutely loved the combo.

Sounds really pretty!

justathought
Feb. 27, 2012, 06:20 PM
Do you have the website for the patterns?

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:15 PM
The website is www.suitability.com

But I just realized that my mom wont let me do this. There goes my dream (kind of) *whoosh* out the window... but it is still fun to think about what you would make, given the chance (if I were older I would just go get the pattern, but I am a very young teenager so I cant just do that...) actually, I think I'm going to try to find a free pattern and make one out of really cheap fabric so that she knows I can (unless it turns out awful), then ill go get some better cloth.

JustMyStyle
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:29 PM
it's hard to tell from this picture (http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/148_519879140940_6913531_32370378_8193_n.jpg) (I can't find a better one) but this is my favorite coat! It's a light brown but has blue and maroon threads. I've worn it with a deep blue shirt, dark brown, and a purple striped shirt.

RLastInstallment
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:32 PM
I personally have a coat that is a really deep plum/burgundy with a sheen that makes it look black in certain light... I've never quite had the guts to wear it though ;)

Where did you get that? I'd love to have one of those!

Hunter Mom
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:50 PM
I would so make myself a cool jumper coat if I could find a pattern. And ride well enough to "earn" it. ;)

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:54 PM
Suit ability has awesome patterns, in just about every discipline! (The H/J coat for $16... *not advertising, just saying*...;))

sschuessler
Feb. 27, 2012, 07:59 PM
Well, I didn't make an english show coat, but I bought a pattern from Suitability and had a western rail shirt made from it by my bf's mom. Their patterns are so easy to use! Highly recommend it!

skippy60
Feb. 27, 2012, 08:02 PM
Really? What are some things I could say to my mom to convince her to let me get the pattern and some cloth? I already have a show coat, but it is getting a bit too small...

Mukluk
Feb. 28, 2012, 01:01 AM
"hey mom, if it turns out nicely, maybe I can make a few to sell and make some money." You might be able to go to a regular fabric store and find a pattern for a coat that could work for your purposes. Good luck!

klmck63
Feb. 28, 2012, 01:41 AM
Really? What are some things I could say to my mom to convince her to let me get the pattern and some cloth? I already have a show coat, but it is getting a bit too small...

How much sewing practice do you have? Making a nicely fitting jacket requires a lot of precision and tailoring which can get pretty tricky.

Maybe you could start with something less ambitious that requires less expensive materials. (Show shirt, maybe?) And if that turns out well, your Mom is probably more likely to allow you to make the investment in the materials required for a coat.

Or, if you have very little sewing experience (especially on a machine), pyjamas are always a good place to start!

Dewey
Feb. 28, 2012, 08:31 AM
I want to echo the post above. Sewing a good-looking hunt coat is not a project for a beginner. I don't want to discourage you, OP, because sewing well is a wonderful skill that you will benefit from your entire life. But start with some easier projects before you tackle the hunt coat. The recommendation of pajamas is a good one, because if you goof up, it won't really matter. Then maybe you could make something for your horse like a bridle bag or a baby pad.

Good luck!

AlyssaSpellman
Feb. 28, 2012, 11:20 AM
I fell in love with this (http://www.equestriancollections.com/NotAvailable.asp?groupcode=RJ10072) shadbelly a year or two ago, and when I finally got the money to order it, I get online and find out it's been discontinued and I can't find it anywhere. So my grandma is going to help me (try to) make one very similar. :)
I'm so excited.. I just hope it turns out well. Purple is my favorite color, and if by some miracle I'm able to make this right, I think it'll be gorgeous.

PonyPenny
Feb. 28, 2012, 11:34 AM
Could you earn enough to at least buy the pattern? You can then practice on remnants or other cheap fabrics just for the practice. Fabric stores have all kinds of remnants. You could also go to a thrift store an buy a mens sport coat in a nice fabric. Take it apart at the seams and use the pattern to cut a new coat out of it. You could probably find a nice coat for around $5.00. Once you get more proficient, your mom might help you buy fabric in bulk. If you can find the fabric that is used in those new GPA or Amino coats and they came out well, you would have clients who would not want to pay the high price of those coats. The Amino coats are quite unique and very popular, but also very expensive. Many great designers started out just like you. Don't give up your dream.

allicolls Aefvue Farms Deep South
Feb. 28, 2012, 11:37 AM
I used to have a tan show coat with a subtle windowpane, which I wore with a darker blue shirt with a tan windowpane. It was one of my favorite outfits and I thought it stood out in a good way, while still looking somewhat "classic" (i.e., no crazy bright colors).

JenEM
Feb. 28, 2012, 11:39 AM
Jackets can be very difficult, especially if you haven't done one before. Perhaps ask if, rather than starting with an expensive pattern and expensive suiting wool for a show coat, you can pick up a cheaper coat pattern (usually JoAnn's has one brand pattern or another on sale for $2 or so, which is when I go stock up--never pay full price for a pattern!) and some less expensive poly-blend suiting and make a simpler style of coat. You'll be able to see how it works out, and you'll then be left with a nice coat. You can probably do that for less than what a yard of good suiting like you'd want to make a show coat with would cost you; you don't want to skimp on fabric, because it will show, and even basic, decent suiting fabric (http://www.moodfabrics.com/index.php?file=productdetail&iprod_id=22214&icat_id=%272%27&icatidntr=%272%27&icatidwtr=&icatidwbt=&icatidwnewtr=&icatidwac=&shortdes=&passtype=Wool_230&vcolor=&vpattern=&vapplication=&pricerange=&onsale=&newarrival=&custfav=&closeout=&wholesale=&pagelimit=24&page=1&keyword=&topmatmsvalms=&vbrand=) isn't cheap.

Rye
Feb. 28, 2012, 12:01 PM
To sew a well-made hunt coat takes some high level of skill. I bought the pattern 10 years ago, found a source for some gorgeous menswear fabrics and sat down to try it out......I got as far as cutting out the pattern. As I read and thought about piecing it together, I realized this was beyond my skill set. I had no idea how to do the interfacing needed on the front of the coat/lapel area to give it the right stiffness.

So I packed it all up in a rubbermaid and went from tailor to tailor until I found a woman who knew exactly how to do this (she's made custom suits for men).

Ended up having her make two of my coats and I love them still to this day:
1) coat 1 was a brown/black houndstooth check with a slight burgundy windowpane and black piping on the collar and tan lining
2) coat 2 is a navy window pane with a light blue lining and light blue piping on the collar....yum!

they fit like a dream.

supaflyskye
Feb. 28, 2012, 12:20 PM
I'd never be able to sew anything, but I love a unique coat.
I have a delightful forest green coat w/ mint & pink pinstripes that I got for a steal. I would just love to have a purpley one.
It's a shame I don't do hunters or eq(eventing & jumpers mainly), so I quite rarely get a chance to wear anything other than my conservatively coloured coat. It's not too boring though, black w/ dark grey & dark purple windowpane.

This (http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj320/Lonely_Equine2/greencoat.jpg) is my awesome green coat, I wish I had a close up photo of the fabric. I've worn it with a white w/ pink windowpane shirt.

skippy60
Feb. 28, 2012, 06:28 PM
Interfacing... ive heard that word a lot. I have come to believe that interfacing is to be a stiff, non woven fabric (like sheds) that is added between the outer cloth and the lining to give support. Am I right? Because I am very confused as to what this means...

kmwines01
Feb. 29, 2012, 01:27 AM
Try to check out some local quilt stores near you. Many quilters also do clothing projects. They may not be familiar with making coats but they can help decipher patterns and help you learn about seam allowances, interfacings, etc. most quilt stores also do beginner sewing classes that can help you get used to your machine and it's unique qualities.

Kestrel
Feb. 29, 2012, 02:08 AM
Skippy60, yes that is interfacing. There are many types - some that stick to the fabric when you iron them on, and some that are sewn into the seams. The problem with iron on is that with cleaning or getting caught in the rain, the interfacing can wrinkle, sometimes more that is easily ironed away. I would go with the non-iron-on type.

I learned to sew as a child, and have made tailored clothing before. Since I'm a perfectionist, they never turn out perfectly and it ruins the clothing for me. I don't mind costumes not being perfect (I've done many Lord of the Rings Arwen and Harry Potter girl's outfits), but show coats have to look just so, and that would be hard.

OP, many sewing machine stores and fabric stores offer cheap classes at all levels. Maybe if you take one or two, your mom would let you try a coat as a class project. Good Luck! If you can sew, you can always make money.

equinedriver
Feb. 29, 2012, 11:23 AM
As someone who has been sewing more than 40 years and made my own breeches as a teenager, if you have never actually sewn before, forget it. A tailored coat is something that is NOT easy to make. You will not buy a pattern, some fabric, sit down in front of a sewing machine and viola, a few hours later have a show coat. They are TAILORED. This means, lining, shoulder pads, fitting, darts, pockets etc. Pardon my language but there is no way in hell you will end up with a coat that would be presentable in a ring.

Since I never had any money, I went to Goodwill, purchased mens suit coats and altered them at the waist to fit a woman and wore those. They cost me a couple bucks a piece and took about an hour to alter, and yes it was back in the dark ages and not the big east coast shows but they couldn't have been that bad as I won equitation classes under Rodney Jenkins and George Morris wearing them.............

So if you are thinking outside the box, try that route. Go look and see what you find in the mens department that catches your eye. For some unknown reason I still have a couple of those coats which are very nice tweeds, one is kind of a light blue..........

woodhillsmanhattan
Mar. 1, 2012, 08:40 PM
I personally have a coat that is a really deep plum/burgundy with a sheen that makes it look black in certain light... I've never quite had the guts to wear it though ;)

Please please please post a picture! I want a deep burgundy coat and am looking at getting one custom made in the next few months.

trail blazer
Mar. 1, 2012, 10:18 PM
Great idea equine driver!!!

Now, I'm dreaming of those nice, new tech fabrics that stretch....where do I find fabric like that? Surely it would be cheaper to have one made than spend $800 for the one I tried on last week?

equinedriver
Mar. 1, 2012, 11:31 PM
It's really not that hard to find. If you happen to be in the Wash DC area, go to G street fabrics in Rockville. Go to the wool department and tell them what you are looking for.

The most incredible fabric store I have been in. Would rival Mood in NY (as seen on Project Runway). The button department at G street has over 1,000,000 (yes that is one million) buttons......They not only have a wool department, they have an IMPORTED wool department LOL. Heaven on earth for a sewer.....

They also have a web page and if you call them on the phone, they will be happy to send swatches etc as there is only a tiny fraction of the stuff they have on the web site.

I am sure Mood would also have a web site. If you live in a more real part of the country, go to either JoAnn's or Hancock fabrics and they would likely have at least a few to choose from and if you ask to speak to the manager they will go and get the books and can order in something that they don't have in stock.

I would think it would cost about $200 to have a tailor make you a coat. If you happen to be in Aiken, would be more than happy to help you out LOL.

JenEM
Mar. 2, 2012, 12:45 AM
I live less than a mile from G Street, and was just at Mood over the weekend (and not for the first time). No comparison between the two, if you're looking for selection, and high quality, go to Mood. (Though I do LOVE the skirt-length suiting remnants for $6 at G Street; I've made so many nice skirts for work that way out of fabric I wouldn't have shelled out for otherwise.) Mood does have a website (http://www.moodfabrics.com/index.php?file=categorylist&icatid=2), and they will send you swatches; prices on the website look a bit cheaper than in store, too, as I paid $2 more per yard for this tweed (http://www.moodfabrics.com/index.php?file=productdetail&iprod_id=15420&icat_id=2,30,1,3,12,29,23&icatidntr=&icatidwtr=&icatidwbt=&icatidwnewtr=&icatidwac=&shortdes=&passtype=&vcolor='Purple'&vpattern=Herringbone&vapplication=&pricerange=&onsale=&newarrival=&custfav=&closeout=&wholesale=&pagelimit=24&page=1&keyword=&topmatmsvalms=&vbrand=)at the store. The wool I linked to above is from there, and is a Lycra blend.

I might also suggest looking on Fabric.com (http://fabric.com/), which I've ordered from before. They've got good prices, and shipping is free over $35. I tend to stock up on "standard" stuff fromt there, like cotton for dresses or muslin. Some of the bengaline suiting I bought from there might actually make a really interesting stretchy coat fabric, now that I think about it.... Perhaps you could get something like this (http://www.fabric.com/apparel-fashion-fabric-suiting-fabric-stretch-suiting-fabric-stretch-blend-bengaline-suiting-hunter-green.aspx?cm_vc=756b1813-cbc1-43b3-84bd-29889bf8fb7b), to test out? If nothing else, you'd not be out the kind of money you'd shell out for decent wool, and might end up with something to wear to work or wherever :) (Though THIS (http://www.moodfabrics.com/index.php?file=productdetail&iprod_id=14670&icat_id=2&shortdes=&passtype=Wool_230&vcolor=&vpattern=&vapplication=&pricerange=&onsale=&newarrival=&custfav=&closeout=&wholesale=&pagelimit=24&page=1&keyword=&vbrand=) would really make a statement in the show ring :eek:)

HuntJumpSC
Mar. 2, 2012, 01:05 AM
This is a pic of me in a Pytchley hunt coat I picked up on clearance about 10 years ago at The Tack Room in Camden, SC. Loved it! It fit like a glove, and was the most gorgeous, unusual shade of green (almost teal) with a windowpane plaid. I was heartbroken when it got too tight in the shoulders for me and had to sell on Ebay (the new owner loved it as well). What I wouldn't give to find another like it! :no:

https://www.facebook.com/HuntJumpSC?ref=tn_tnmn#!/photo.php?fbid=1094780886748&set=a.1048956901177.2007901.1143349940&type=3&theater

trail blazer
Mar. 2, 2012, 01:08 AM
What about the new washable fabrics used for the soft shell jackets? What do you call them? Do the fabric stores offer that, or do you think it can be found online?

SugarAndSpite
Mar. 2, 2012, 04:02 AM
Where did you get that? I'd love to have one of those!

So Im really late on the response for this, but it was actually a suit coat that was styled EXACTLY like a hunt coat minus the two back vents - I had a seamstress I know put them in. It looks exactly like a hunt coat, except for the color ;)


Still waiting to wear it though!

SugarAndSpite
Mar. 2, 2012, 04:13 AM
Here is a pic of the fabric on the coat - I tried to show how it goes from black to burgundy.

I made a photobucket account just so you all could take a peek ;) I thought it was too bold to wear in the hunters.

The coat is several shades darker in person and the sheen isn't nearly as apparent, but this is close up with flash - I'm sure you get the idea.


http://i1167.photobucket.com/albums/q627/SugarAndSpite/DSC_0001.jpg

equinedriver
Mar. 2, 2012, 07:57 AM
Okay, JenEM, you're just trying to make me jealous.

Never been to Mood, dream trip for me LOL.

I worked at G Street back in the dark ages about 85 to 87 or so when we lived in the area in the Bernina department. Still sewing on the machines that I bought when I worked there. Nothing like an old, gear driven Bernina.

JenEM
Mar. 2, 2012, 08:52 AM
Okay, JenEM, you're just trying to make me jealous.

Never been to Mood, dream trip for me LOL.

I worked at G Street back in the dark ages about 85 to 87 or so when we lived in the area in the Bernina department. Still sewing on the machines that I bought when I worked there. Nothing like an old, gear driven Bernina.

And I'm jealous of your Bernina! I oogle them every time I go in; when I win the lottery, I want one of the ones that will monogram things for me :D G Street is another league from little stores like JoAnns, and the people working there tend to be pretty knowledgeable. The first time I went in there I was pretty overwhelmed at the selection of actual nice clothing fabric, rather than a store of mostly quilting stuff and polyester! They're just not quite Mood in the selection department, though.

I tend to go up to NYC at least once a year to see a show or two, so I always make stopping at Mood part of the itinerary. I was frankly surprised when I realized anyone can just go in and shop there. This past time, I took my SO in as well, and he about dropped over when he saw the prices on some of the really nice suiting--I don't think I've ever paid for a hunt coat what one yard of that fabric cost!

kmwines01
Mar. 2, 2012, 09:14 AM
If you're on the West Coast, I believe there's a great store in San Francisco. I'll have to ask my mother who makes a sewing sabbatical out there every year. I do have to say though that the skill involved in making a coat sounds pretty high level. My mom is a great quilter and I think she would absolutely refuse to make me a hunt coat! She and clothing sewing do not get along at all. I've done a few pieces and just thinking about cutting out very precise patterns with exact seam allowances, how exact your seams have to be, etc is dizzying.

And JenEM: if you buy one of the Berninas that monograms you will eventually have everything in your horse wardrobe and real life monogrammed! I sent polos, pads, everything home to my mom to monogram for me. My rain jacket is monogrammed on the sleeve, all her purses are monogrammed, everything. And I got some pretty exciting baby pad embroidery work when she was starting out.

rugbygirl
Mar. 2, 2012, 09:46 AM
I love Mood. I found some gorgeous coat wools there, alpaca blends and one Merino-silk blend.

A hunt coat is a tricky proposition, but that's what muslin is for. another economical way to test a pattern and screw up is to use sheets that are being retired at home or from a thrift store. Wash, press, attempt pattern and assembly.

A lot of people are afraid of sewing. The way I see it, all hobbies cost money, and sometimes a project ends up totally horrible...it's just wasted time and thread. And you probably learned a lot. Lots of hobbies/vices are more damaging than that.

OP, you do sound young...can you take sewing at school? I enjoyed fashion studies...barring that, a sewing class at a store would be a good plan. Especially one that it's a dealer/service center for your brand of machine. There are tricks and things to know about all machines, and it ire really nice to have someone there to help you sort it out at first.

equinedriver
Mar. 2, 2012, 06:03 PM
Well, I was going to tell you to buy a Bernina on Ebay until you got to the monogram part...........those are pricy. I have a 930, but a 910 would do you just fine and can be bought on ebay for less than $500.

I bought my daughter one on ebay when she went to college and she just had a baby so I gave her my serger, I hadn't used it for quite a while but used it ALOT when the kids were little. She was apparently nearly the only girl on campus that took a sewing machine to school so she ended up hemming everyone's pants and sewing all the costumes for party's LOL.

As far as the monograms go, our wal mart here in Aiken has an embroidery thing in the front. Once they have your farm logo (which was about $15) it's incredibly cheap to have anything monogramed. If you take things in on Tues it's half price, so less than $5 each for my farm logo, so I could never pay for what the machine would cost me at $5 each.

just a thought.

JenEM
Mar. 2, 2012, 07:01 PM
A lot of people are afraid of sewing. The way I see it, all hobbies cost money, and sometimes a project ends up totally horrible...it's just wasted time and thread. And you probably learned a lot. Lots of hobbies/vices are more damaging than that.

OP, you do sound young...can you take sewing at school? I enjoyed fashion studies...barring that, a sewing class at a store would be a good plan. Especially one that it's a dealer/service center for your brand of machine. There are tricks and things to know about all machines, and it ire really nice to have someone there to help you sort it out at first.

That's where I learned to sew--took classes in middle and high school both. I didn't touch a machine for years, but got a nice Brother for Christmas two years ago, and have been learning by combining trial-and-error with what I already knew. The "error" project fabric (and all the scraps!) gets re-purposed into dog toys, so it's pretty win-win :) If you have the option of taking a sewing class as an elective at your school, OP, I'd highly recommend it; once you've got the basics, doing more is really just a matter of following directions.

The only reason I'd upgrade or get a different machine would be for the monogramming. I don't care enough to track somewhere down to monogram things for me, but if I had the machine, everything the horse has would have either her name or mine stitched on it!

equinedriver
Mar. 2, 2012, 07:27 PM
Well, my grandmother taught me to sew. She sewed without patterns, would just cut it out. We lived in NC when I was little near the mills and she would go and buy a ridiculous amount of knit fabric and ship it home to IA on the bus. For years the spare bedroom bed was stacked high with knit T shirts she had made in graduating sizes. We would go in and take ones from the stack that was our size. (There were 22 grandkids born in 5 years after the war). When we went on vacation in the summer she would make matching shirts for my mom and dad and all us kids. Each day we would all wear the same shirt and it made it much easier for mom and dad to keep track of all us kids and for us kids to spot our parents LOL. She also made my underwear until I hit Jr High and had gym class. Thick double knit home made underwear were just totally not acceptable at that point and I finally refused to wear them. Like I said earlier, we were somewhat poor when I was a kid which lead to the Goodwill men's suit jackets and homemade breeches.

When I took home ec in 7th grade we were suppose to take like 4 weeks to make an apron out of gingham fabric. I finished mine the first day. Teacher nearly had a heart attack. I had sewed my 1/4" seam without measuring and pinning and have her check it first. She started lecturing me about how it had to be 1/4" and was standing there with her hem gauge checking the seam. She got about 1/2 around the apron, still measuring 1/4" seam, so quit measuring and told me to help the other kids for the next month LOL.

She was a great grandmother. Taught me how to butcher chickens, make pies, gravy, knit and crochet. She also knew how to Tat and I never learned, I am sorry to say. She was really my substitute mother as the one I had was never around. In almost 10 years of showing and doing well she never came to a single horse show. But I digress.

JenEM
Mar. 2, 2012, 08:27 PM
Well, my grandmother taught me to sew....

When I took home ec in 7th grade we were suppose to take like 4 weeks to make an apron out of gingham fabric. I finished mine the first day.


Sadly, the grandmother that sewed passed away when I was in 3rd grade, so while I learned to crochet from her (and now have her crochet box of goodies), I was a little too young to be deemed safe around the sewing equipment. She used to make and alter suits for my grandfather and dad. I wish I'd been able to know her when I was a little older, because I'm pretty sure she'd have taught me how to make the OP's "crazy awesome coats" :)

In home ec, we started with simple stuff like a "gym bag" and Christmas stocking. I managed to finish both of those quickly enough that I had time to make another one before the rest of the class finished one :lol: In high school, my sewing teacher helped me alter the sleeves on my first show coat.

So OP, if you want to learn, there are people and places out there that will teach you! Your first project won't be (and definitely should NOT be!) a coat, but you can get there if you put in a little effort!

rugbygirl
Mar. 2, 2012, 10:43 PM
I'm more from jenEM's experience too...the semester-long apron was how I learned the language of sewing, patterns, machines...the only thing I could already do well was press and starch. My dad is OCD about ironing.

my first quilt (current project) has more than its share of problems, but it is impeccably pressed. :winkgrin: I have to finish the stupid thing before I move back to garments and my beautiful wools and silk linings. I got a dress form for Christmas and I am getting antsy to use it! I have some awesome patterns from the 50s to work.

Right horses. Well, the quilt is horse-themed and intended for my trailer tack room/camp LQ.