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View Full Version : When do you hand the ride over to a pro?



kookicat
Jan. 29, 2012, 08:24 PM
Been thinking about this a bit tonight. My trainer and I were aiming Rue at advanced at the back end of this season. I don't know if I'm going to be fit enough to ride him because of a knee injury. My trainer is no longer riding because of her own injuries, or I'd ask her.

I don't know if I should try to stick to the plan and hope my knee heals in time or start looking for a pro rider to take him on now.

What would you do?

s65horsey
Jan. 29, 2012, 09:24 PM
I think it depends on what your own goals are as a rider. If it is your goal as a rider to compete at Advanced then I'd work as hard as I could to be fit and ready by the end of the season. Physical therapy is a wonderful thing and can completely turn around an injury if you follow the plan and work at it.

If your goal is to just have your horse go around then at some point you are going to want to find someone who can ride him since you riding your horse is not feasible at this time (again depending on how injured you are).

retreadeventer
Jan. 29, 2012, 10:05 PM
I'd say fit the horse to a rider, and go on...and get back riding as soon as you can. It's no big deal to have more folks in your "horse family" working on your behalf.

CdnRider
Jan. 29, 2012, 11:41 PM
Not that I will ever be riding at the level that you are at, but - why push yourself past your limit if you have the resources for your horse to get there while you heal properly? If a pro can competently move your horse up to the next level, your horse will only be further along when you are ready to take over the ride. Eventing without being able bodied could have dire consequences especially with the added task of moving up. (I realize its "just" a knee injury but still it will affect some of how you ride.)

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 30, 2012, 11:44 AM
There is no right or wrong answer to this. In the end....just do what works for you.


I personally hand my ride over to a pro..sort of...when I don't have time because of work. (I rarely totally hand over the ride but my trainer helps me keep my horses' work consistent when my work prevents me from doing it all myself).


Other time I hand over the ride is if we are having some issues....and I think some time with a Pro will help the horse progress in their training.


In your situation...it is hard because it starts to get a lot more risky at these levels. If a pro moves your horse up...he could get hurt. There is also the miles the need together before the move up. IMO, I'd have someone help you keep him going while you heal (maybe improve the Dressage or SJ)...but maybe delay moving up to Advance a season. If it looks like it is going to take you a bit longer to get fit again...then you may want to reconsider.

Plans with horses change all the time!

dom_schramm_Equestrian
Jan. 30, 2012, 10:32 PM
First of all congratulations on getting where you have - thats an accomplishment not everybody achieves.

I think all the points that have been raised are all very sensible things that I'm sure you are/have been contemplating. I just wanted to mention one idea from another rider's perspective.

By entering into a relationship with another professional rider as more of an 'owner' be careful not to underestimate how quickly things can change. For example, all of a sudden your horse has 3 top three placings in a row and your rider is going to very much want to keep the ride on him and perhaps your aspirations of riding the horse at that level slip back a notch.

I guess it just depends on your goals but I would recommend spending a good amount of time thinking through the 'what-ifs' so you have some clarity on what your own goals are versus what your hopes and ambitions are for your horse.

Best of luck and hopefully you'll heal up soon and not have to worry about it

Carol Ames
Jan. 31, 2012, 12:10 AM
When the horses' performance/ ability is overshadowed by the errors/ faults resulting from your own riding; My horse was much better than my riding made her appear:no: to be; also I knew my nerves/:eek: guts would not allow me to move up :no:

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 31, 2012, 09:09 AM
First of all congratulations on getting where you have - thats an accomplishment not everybody achieves.

I think all the points that have been raised are all very sensible things that I'm sure you are/have been contemplating. I just wanted to mention one idea from another rider's perspective.

By entering into a relationship with another professional rider as more of an 'owner' be careful not to underestimate how quickly things can change. For example, all of a sudden your horse has 3 top three placings in a row and your rider is going to very much want to keep the ride on him and perhaps your aspirations of riding the horse at that level slip back a notch.



This is so true too. I also had a pro who was also my trainer. He blew my own confidence so much (not really on purpose I think) that I didn't "want" to take back the ride on my horse. So you really do need to be careful.

Also, if you do have someone else ride your horse AND intend to ride him again....make sure you pick a Pro whose riding style is similar to you. If you are a 5'3" 110 lbs woman...having William Fox Pitt ride your horse may not be the best choice;)

Catie79
Jan. 31, 2012, 04:50 PM
I'm having my first taste of having someone else ride my horse right now and it's surprisingly difficult. Not for my horse, sounds like she's having a blast, but for me because I want to be the one in the saddle. Nowhere near your level, of course.

I guess it falls back to the question of which is the more pressing goal: your horse going advanced or for you to go advanced? If you're looking to be the one in the saddle, I'd say hold off until your knee is ready. If you want your horse to go around at advanced regardless of who's in the saddle, I'd say set him up with a pro. Horses are always finding ways to flub up our plans, so better to not wait too long if you'll have as much enjoyment seeing a pro take him around.

retreadeventer
Jan. 31, 2012, 05:52 PM
I think you have to be ready to be an owner and stand on the sidelines.

Dawnd
Jan. 31, 2012, 06:08 PM
Again it goes back to your goals as s65 stated.

If your goal is the development of the working relationship with your horse, waiting until it is you in the saddle, would be the more sound choice.

If your goal is to get to Advanced, then perhaps you might make a different choice.

Neither is right and neither is wrong.

What I would be fearful of is the "what if". Like everyone said, so much can go wrong. To hand over my horse at the level that you are at is a complete leap of faith and one that I would only enter into if my plans were that the horse were a sale prospect.

scubed
Jan. 31, 2012, 06:21 PM
You might find it interesting to read Holly Hudspeth's blog starting about here: http://hollyhudspetheventing.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-04-25T16:10:00-07:00&max-results=7 I think she has some interesting insights (although she is obviously a top-notch pro herself). I will also respectfully disagree a bit with retreadeventer. Many of the really top riders have their programs and expect you to stand on the sidelines and be an owner, but there are plenty who are happy to have you much more involved. Which model you want should also be factored into your choice of professional if you decided to go that route

JER
Jan. 31, 2012, 07:15 PM
I'm a little unusual in that I like to find the right rider for my horses fairly early in their careers, although I like to wait until my horses are 5 or 6 before they start competing. That said, I have a barely-4 YO who will be heading south and east soon because he's mature for his age (I didn't breed this one) and ready to be more serious.

I have zero competitive aspirations myself but I do like breeding and starting quality eventers.

With the right preparation and an appropriate match of rider, a capable horse can progress through the levels quite easily.

kookicat, if I were in your position, I'd have a short list of potential riders in mind (and I'd probably have a talk with each of them), but I'd also keep riding the horse for now to see how the year shapes up. You might find you have more condition and confidence that you thought.

:)

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 31, 2012, 07:27 PM
You might find it interesting to read Holly Hudspeth's blog starting about here: http://hollyhudspetheventing.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-04-25T16:10:00-07:00&max-results=7 I think she has some interesting insights (although she is obviously a top-notch pro herself). I will also respectfully disagree a bit with retreadeventer. Many of the really top riders have their programs and expect you to stand on the sidelines and be an owner, but there are plenty who are happy to have you much more involved. Which model you want should also be factored into your choice of professional if you decided to go that route

I agree....there are some riders who just want owners who stand on the sidelines and write them checks....and there are others who are happy to have owners who are a more active part of the process. A lot depends on the goals and both parties working well together....and able to communicate well.