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ChelsaeJo
Jan. 18, 2012, 02:18 PM
King has a very long sloping wither.. His withers end after his point of shoulder. Vet said it's not a big deal - was just wondering if anyone else has dealt with this and what they have done to fix it??

Hawks Nest
Jan. 18, 2012, 03:29 PM
I don't think you can really fix it. Just get a saddle that fits and build up his topline. I've had a horse with a really long withers and he was difficult to fit but it never caused him a single problem (he had plenty of others though :( )

flyracing
Jan. 18, 2012, 08:02 PM
What would you like to fix? I don't know any vet that would surgically alter the wither conformation just because it's not textbook.

I have a horse with long withers and a short back (10 years now) evented through intermediate and been back sore 10-15 spdays that I've known him. Best back I've ever known (soundness wise).

Hey Mickey
Jan. 18, 2012, 08:27 PM
A couple of things to think about.

I also have a horse with long and Big withers.
It can be a challenge to find a saddle that works. Finding a saddle that fit my horse and me was impossible...So impossible that I got measured for something custom and was told "No wonder you haven't found anything, What you need for this horse and you doesn't exist." Ok cool...

Thought Number 2, which is equally important.
I remember reading your post about looking for a horse?
If I remember correctly the horse you're getting is off the track?
I strongly urge you to have a chiropractor/body worker/massage-er (i can't figure out how to spell the right word...) work on your horse multiple times because I have seen horses backs change shape after being worked on. Your horses withers could be jammed from who knows what and can actually get bigger after they've been un-jammed. (umm ask me how I know...) I also had a horse who I got straight off the track who had a twisted spine...

There are tons and tons of saddle fit threads on here.
Start reading! There is a ton of information on different types of horses, backs, saddles etc.

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 18, 2012, 11:52 PM
Oops - I should have been clearer. =\ When I said "fix" I just meant how to compensate for it, so it doesn't cause him any pain. Although, I've rode him in 3 different saddles now, and two of them have been fine - the other was a bit more difficult but not bad.

I know the withers change ALL the time, so at least I have the hope it'l get better, but as it is, it really isn't bothering him.

Chelsie - yeah, I will definitely find those and read them. Thanks! :) I bought him (sign the papers tomorrow) for less then the asking price in order to compensate for some of the work he needs done. First apt. is on Wednesday! :)

Auto Be A Storm
Jan. 19, 2012, 08:39 AM
My TB is built with a shark fin with that is long, all I can do is try to build muscle in his back and keep him maintaining it. Also saddle fitting has been a challenge for us, I have a schleese dressage saddle and in the market for a schleese x-country saddle too. Having the saddles customized to Storm has been a huge help!!!!

SEPowell
Jan. 19, 2012, 08:41 AM
I view long withers as a good thing, they work well with good shoulders. And I view long high withers as a good thing too. Both, however, make saddle fitting pretty difficult.

If you ever have a chance to go to steeplechase races go and watch horses walk untacked into the paddock. You'll see many long high withers and many horses who can run and jump.

Duramax
Jan. 19, 2012, 10:58 AM
Long withers tend to go along with a long sloping shoulder, which equals longer and more ground covering strides... so its a good thing! :yes:

netg
Jan. 19, 2012, 12:33 PM
I'm still trying to picture and haven't been able to... what the heck are withers which go past the point of the shoulder? Did I read that wrong?


As for long withers in general - just make sure you check saddle fit regularly! Really check for any possible bridging happening, clearance under the saddle, etc. Good for you that you're paying attention to it to try to make sure you do what's right for your horse!