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View Full Version : Slow Twist Rope Gag VS. Regular Snaffle Rope Gag?



Addictedeventer
Jan. 16, 2012, 09:42 PM
Caption basically speaks for itself! Let me know experiences :)

Also is the slow twist gag USEA legal?
http://www.onestopequineshop.com/Slow-Twist-Gag-Bit_p_213.html

Highflyer
Jan. 16, 2012, 09:52 PM
There's no rule about bits for the jumping phases. I have never used one so I can't say for sure, other than that the twist would presumably be more severe, so I would start with the plain gag and move up if necessary.

baref00t
Jan. 16, 2012, 10:12 PM
I LOVED my regular full cheek rope gag on my horse who thought he was the world's strongest giraffe. I had tried a slow twist full cheek and corkscrew full cheek with no luck, switched to the plain full cheek rope gag and suddenly had control. Never had to try any sort of twist with the rope gag, even for XC, so I can't speak for that.

ake987
Jan. 16, 2012, 10:31 PM
I personally would not use a rope gag with a twist. Of course, every horse is different and I suppose for some, in the right hands, this bit may be effective.

I would start with a rubber mullen gag or a double jointed snaffle gag. My guy goes in a double jointed snaffle rope gag for the jumping phases because it allows me to rebalance him more subtly and more quickly than in his flat bit (plain double jointed snaffle with a copper bean). But that is just a clinic/competition/XC school bit, we usually school OF in his "flat bit" so that the gag doesn't lose it's efficacy.

These are what I would steer toward: Rubber Mullen Gag (http://www.horseloverz.com/Coronet-Hard-Rubber-Mullen-Mouth-Gag-Bit-pr-206095.html) or Double Jointed Snaffle Gag (http://www.horseloverz.com/Metalab-Stainless-steel-Cheltenham-Gag-with--Oval-mouth---Stainless-Steel---5-12-pr-278842.html)

:)

Addictedeventer
Jan. 17, 2012, 07:16 AM
Sorry, i should have stated that i have him in a slow twist gag now and im thinking about putting in something thats still a rope gag but not as severe as the slow twist. Thanks for your help everyone.

Addictedeventer
Jan. 17, 2012, 07:17 AM
I personally would not use a rope gag with a twist. Of course, every horse is different and I suppose for some, in the right hands, this bit may be effective.

I would start with a rubber mullen gag or a double jointed snaffle gag. My guy goes in a double jointed snaffle rope gag for the jumping phases because it allows me to rebalance him more subtly and more quickly than in his flat bit (plain double jointed snaffle with a copper bean). But that is just a clinic/competition/XC school bit, we usually school OF in his "flat bit" so that the gag doesn't lose it's efficacy.

These are what I would steer toward: Rubber Mullen Gag (http://www.horseloverz.com/Coronet-Hard-Rubber-Mullen-Mouth-Gag-Bit-pr-206095.html) or Double Jointed Snaffle Gag (http://www.horseloverz.com/Metalab-Stainless-steel-Cheltenham-Gag-with--Oval-mouth---Stainless-Steel---5-12-pr-278842.html)

:)


What are the advantages of the double jointed gag?

ake987
Jan. 17, 2012, 08:12 PM
What are the advantages of the double jointed gag?

The double jointed is a bit milder than the single jointed because it won't jab the roof of the mouth with extreme contact (or when I catch my horse in the mouth by accident :o).

Although I might surmise that some of the single jointed snaffles that are shaped and curved might also limit that jabbing action. All I know is my horse cannot tolerate a single jointed bit in any way, shape, or form - he has made that clear! But he also has a small mouth and a low palate.

Also, a double jointed snaffle could potentially have a roller or something to keep the mouth busy - can change up what the link is to have a different effect. French link/bean configuration is pretty mild, whereas the Dr. Bristol piece would be a touch more severe as the joint administers more tongue pressure than either of the former.

If your horse goes fine now in a single jointed snaffle though, this probably is totally irrelevant and I've just rambled on. As usual. :D

PNWjumper
Jan. 18, 2012, 12:02 AM
My question would be why are you looking at moving to a milder bit? Are you wanting a slightly softer mouthpiece or a little less "grab"? Or is there another reason?

I use a slow twist gag on my boy when we're at shows. He can turn into an absolute freight train with a 20' stride in the blink of an eye, and the single jointed, french link, and rubber gags that I tried did next to nothing and the corkscrew gag was too much....no need for a 4' stride on course! :lol: The slow twist gag is not a whole lot different that any of the others, but it just give me just a hair more "grab" that can keep my guy on a slightly more compressed stride in a huge grass field.