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gold2012
Jan. 15, 2012, 07:00 PM
So, I was on Facebook the other day, and a friend had posted about a fox in her barn, and the subsequent story till it left, and it reminded me about a barn interloper I had about 8 years ago.

Since it's kinda boring around eventer land, thought it might be fun, to hear everyone's stories about things that appeared in thier barns....

Here is mine:

I am a compulsive, animal bringer homer person. I admit it. IF I see a stray, in it goes. I see an injured animal, in it comes. Doesn't matter, wild, tame....in they come.

I once, in PA, picked up a ground hog that was lying in the street, in shock. Put it in my solarium, in a cage. Did I mention ALL my antique glass was out there, on the window ledges? Well, next morning, said ground hog was fine, out of the cage, never did figure that out. And my glass was mostly broken. Guess what, just FYI, ground hogs are NOT covered by homeowners.

But, that isn't my barn story. Just a funny prelude.

I went out one day to make grain, feed the 10 horses in the barn. Our barn was in TX, and was one of those cool barns in that it didn't have back walls on one side, and all the stalls opened up to the outdoors. MEANING, anything could wonder up and in. Each horse had it's own paddock, and I just loved that barn.

I had built a workshop off the back of it, to store hay and whatnot. So I went out, and opened the door to the shop, and this FURRY thing moved. WELL....it was HUGE. I distinctly remember it was HUGE!!!

I screamed as any NORMAL human being would do, and ran in and got Missy. Now Missy is a brave girl, and she took a stick (HELLO, WHAT GOOD IS A STICK AGAINST A BEAR?) and went out to see what it was that was in the shop. I JUST KNEW it had to be a bear.

So she takes said stick and pushes door open. out walks the most horrid smelling, gross looking animal I have ever seen. An angora goat, gone all wrong. His hair hadn't been done anything with in years, I am sure, and he stunk, oh my gosh he stunk. WELL....we screamed, and Melissa ran track in high-school, including high jump. Too bad we hadn't had a goat back then, she would have set all kinda records. She jumped pretty huge. Of course, 10 hungry horses all jumped too! Really, TB's are pretty smart, they calmed down way faster then we did.

Well, after having screamed and jumped, we took a good look, and figured out my bear was nothing more then a billy goat. It WAS a big goat ok.

Anyway, being the animal lovers we are, we decided Mr. Goat could stay, and we would take care of that fowl smelling hair. First order of business, (remember, just cause we love animals, does NOT mean, we know ANYTHING about goats) a bath.

WELL....

That goat did NOT like his bath, he did NOT think it was needed, and he sure did NOT hold still. After shampooing said Goat, several times, we had suceeded in making us smell like him, wetting down several hundred feet of dirt, and pissing off one said goat. Oh, BY THE WAY, goats don't shrink in water.

Then, we figured, okay, we will blow dry the goat, and then use clippers to clip off the crap.

Two things. Blow drying a smell goat does one thing very well. It is NOT dry the goat, but to spread the smell of said goat several hundred if not thousand feet in every direction. Including neighbors, who I am sure, thought the world was ending.

Second blow drying a goat, that does not want blow dried, can be difficult. We got er done.

So....Next comes said clipping job. Did you know that male Angora Goats DO NOT like to be clipped? We indeed found this out. Much to the amusement of our entire herd of horses, who I SWEAR were laughing at us! YEs, as a herd, they stood and watched us make up 4 letter words, Wrestly a goat, saw said clippers hit the dirt. IF you need to ruin a pair of clipper blades fast, just go find the local angora goat, he can do a great job.

About halfway through said goat, clippers broke, and horses went back to grazing. I do believe that might be the only time in my life, other then feeding, that I had an entire herd of horses watch me for 2 hours.

Frustrated, VERY stinky, as in husband did NOT allow me back in my own home and threw shampoo out for us to hose down and shower outside in our wash stall, several hours later, said goat was half shaved, pissed, and staying on the other side of the barnyard.

Next morning, went out to feed....goat was gone. Can you imagine? HMPH. He didn't stay around to say thank you, or go through a repeat performance of clippers vs. goat.

SO....if ever in Bryan, TX, and you see a goat, who is longer in some areas then others....that would be him.

Next...................................:yes:

Ainsley688
Jan. 15, 2012, 08:03 PM
How 'bout seagulls? I went to the barn after school one day, and hello! Seagull in the aisle-way!? I ended up herding the poor thing into one of the stalls, getting 2 muck buckets, and carrying it out of the barn across the driveway into the neighbors field. Never saw it again. :-D

My boyfriend and I were mowing one of our lawns for the day, and came across a goat...naturally, I found her some crackers for a treat, and figured out where she came from. Super nice goat, she had a collar and everything.

SonnysMom
Jan. 15, 2012, 09:48 PM
Mine wasn't at the barn but on the way home from the barn. I found an adolescent red tail hawk. It had come down from the nest and was on the road. While I waited for DH to come with a towel and welding gloves other cars going by kept telling me he had been there for close to 24 hours. The mother hawk kept buzzing me while I waited.
DH & I loaded the hawk into the car and took him home. Since it was a Sunday I could not get a hold of the SPCA or anybody for wildlife. While I was making calls the hawk is wandering around my office checking out things.
I wound up calling my small animal vet since he does some work for a raptor rehab. He hooked me up with one of the rehab people who met me in a local strip mall parking lot. She tubed the hawk right there to get fluids in her.
Once the hawk was old enough that rehabber sent her up to a place where they teach them to fly and find food. When she was ready to be released into the wild they brought her to my property and set her free there.
DH and I would spot Junior off and on for the rest of that fall. We are pretty sure she came back in the spring.

Catie79
Jan. 15, 2012, 11:00 PM
Random rooster!

We're hanging out around the barn and this rooster just comes right in and makes himself comfortable. We end up herding him into the grain room where he makes himself at home. He's amazingly well behaved and tame for a rooster. He settles on the counter and clucks to himself while watching the girls make dinner for the horses.

None of the neighbors were missing a rooster and we couldn't leave him in the grain room (polite but not housebroken). Someone had chickens and offered to give him a place to stay. Only problem was that we needed to load him up in the car. We stood around and stared at him, trying to figure out how this was going to work. My mom has chickens so I learned how to handle them (whether I wanted to or not) and I chucked a sweatshirt on him and scooped him up. That darn rooster didn't struggle at all, just clucked a bit while we settled him in a box, loaded him in the car, and sent him on his way to his new home and new harem.

Nicest rooster I ever met.

frugalannie
Jan. 16, 2012, 11:34 AM
I'm sure that this has happened to others. Our old barn was center aisle with large sliding doors at either end. On one side in the middle was a normal 36 inch door up three steps from the driveway. In the winter, we normally kept the end doors closed unless turning in/out, and there was a hook and eye on the front door towards the street so it couldn't be opened accidentally. So I went out to feed one night, and there was a panicked deer in the aisle. As soon as she saw me she charged at the end door and almost knocked herself out. We eventually got her to go to the open door at the other end, all the while wondering why she chose to go up three steps and enter through the side door.

But then, when my neighbor's horses got out, a couple of them decided to enter our barn the same way and made themselves comfy in stalls.

And of course, there were the raccoons...

OTTB FTW
Jan. 16, 2012, 06:49 PM
A rabid fox, with a thankfully happy ending for the horses.

Fox entered the barn and jumped through the grain hole in the stall bars. Chose the wrong horse to mess with though. Picked the witchiest, nastiest, alpha mare I have ever known. Big mistake. The barn help found him flat as a pancake in her stall in the am. She was checked for hours by the vet, and had not one scratch on her. His flattened carcass tested positive for rabies.

gold2012
Jan. 16, 2012, 07:01 PM
A rabid fox, with a thankfully happy ending for the horses.

Fox entered the barn and jumped through the grain hole in the stall bars. Chose the wrong horse to mess with though. Picked the witchiest, nastiest, alpha mare I have ever known. Big mistake. The barn help found him flat as a pancake in her stall in the am. She was checked for hours by the vet, and had not one scratch on her. His flattened carcass tested positive for rabies.

WOW!

frugalannie
Jan. 16, 2012, 09:04 PM
A rabid fox, with a thankfully happy ending for the horses.

Fox entered the barn and jumped through the grain hole in the stall bars. Chose the wrong horse to mess with though. Picked the witchiest, nastiest, alpha mare I have ever known. Big mistake. The barn help found him flat as a pancake in her stall in the am. She was checked for hours by the vet, and had not one scratch on her. His flattened carcass tested positive for rabies.

I think we have a winner!