PDA

View Full Version : shoeing to prevent stone bruises?



DevilsAdvocate
Jan. 14, 2012, 08:10 AM
I had a friend of mine tell me shes recently shod her other wise sound large pony on all 4s due to her getting stone bruises. She then asked me "shoeing does help for this right?" I honestly had no answer one way or another only that the only time my old horse ever got a stone bruise was during the time when he was shod all around, not that I think one caused the other. Any thoughts on this?

deltawave
Jan. 14, 2012, 08:15 AM
It can't prevent all bruises, but having 3/8" of steel between the soles and the ground (with the rest of the sole also elevated to some degree) sure does help. It is one of the more obvious indications for shoes, I believe. :)

DevilsAdvocate
Jan. 14, 2012, 08:17 AM
It certainly makes sense to me also. I'm hoping some of the farriers on the boards chime in on this to confirm one way or another. Thanks for your input!

merrygoround
Jan. 14, 2012, 09:33 AM
For some horses who make a habit of bruising, wide web shoes cover a larger area. Sometimes, just the extra elevation off the ground on a standard shoe is sufficient.

Of course pads are the ultimate protection, but have problems of their own.

ThirdCharm
Jan. 14, 2012, 04:47 PM
The wider web shoes provide protection for x amt of surface areas, plus 3/8" extra ground clearance for the remaining exposed sole. Of course leather pads, or pads with equipak can be used to provide even more protection....

Jennifer

retreadeventer
Jan. 14, 2012, 06:52 PM
Full sole coverage (pads, Equithane, etc.) is a pretty good anti-stone bruise insurance policy. Next best is a wide web or extra coverage shoe, with just plain shoes next best. Anytime you remove the sole from direct contact with a rock or stone you'll be at the best place to prevent sole bruising, but removing ground contact also has some drawbacks. I have a horse who does wear full pads on the bullet-proof part of the year and just rim pads or Equithane the rest of the year. (Mainly because mucky ground creates nice suck-tion for those full pads out hunting all winter!)