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EventingMEF
Jan. 12, 2012, 01:24 AM
What products/supplements/daily routines do you guys use to keep your horses really really black? My guy has a stunning black coat that is beginning to fade and he just looks so much better when hes super dark...

Thanks!

candysgirl
Jan. 12, 2012, 02:39 AM
There are several products that can help, but the easiest way is to keep him out of the sun. Be careful with supplements if you compete, most of them are illegal. They generally contain paprika which contains capsaicin.

Some people use fly sheets (some of them are meant to double as sun protection). Some use various sprays with sunscreen in them.

The only 100% thing is turn them out overnight and keep them in, out of the sun during the day.

Grataan
Jan. 12, 2012, 03:46 AM
I use a shampoo, conditioner, and coat spray that contain sunblock, I minimize her sun exposure, and I feed her paprika.

Guardian1
Jan. 12, 2012, 08:20 AM
Good Grain & Good Groomings! :)

deltawave
Jan. 12, 2012, 08:22 AM
Own a non-fading one, or don't let them out in the sunshine, or accept that a healthy, happy horse is gorgeous no matter what color! :)

wcporter
Jan. 12, 2012, 08:37 AM
what does paprika do? :confused:

deltawave
Jan. 12, 2012, 09:18 AM
The pigments in the paprika family are supposed to help with coat color. The other substances in the paprika family are also closely related to capsicum, which is a banned substance as it is used as a pain blocker.

BeanCounterPony
Jan. 12, 2012, 09:34 AM
Mine wears a UVA blocking flysheet in the summer...one with a neck. Fly mask with ears too. Anything that covers her as much as possible during the day. Id say leaving in during the day in the summer would be best but mine must be out.

Shampoos and supplements cant make up for sun bleaching. I dont think they work anyways. Maybe flyspray with a sunscreen but it doesnt last very long.

deltawave
Jan. 12, 2012, 09:40 AM
My info might be outdated, but I was under the impression that some blacks bleach and some do not, and that it's a genetic thing. My black/white Shetland NEVER is anything but BLACK, while my black/white pinto will become a nice dark bay-ish color on his dark parts. I keep him covered to keep the white parts WHITE, not the black parts black. :lol:

Cluck
Jan. 12, 2012, 09:55 AM
A copper supplement can help.

JB
Jan. 12, 2012, 10:07 AM
My info might be outdated, but I was under the impression that some blacks bleach and some do not, and that it's a genetic thing. My black/white Shetland NEVER is anything but BLACK, while my black/white pinto will become a nice dark bay-ish color on his dark parts. I keep him covered to keep the white parts WHITE, not the black parts black. :lol:
Yes, there are genetics involved here. Fading and non-fading black, neither being related to being homozygous black as often thought :)


A copper supplement can help.
Absolutely. IME it's not uncommon to be lacking some copper, and this is ESPECIALLY true if the soil in the area is high in iron - that suppresses the copper and zinc in the forage, which means less in the horse. Also, the darker the coat, the more copper is needed, as copper is part of the melanin production.

I have greatly reduced - though will never eliminate - the fading since adding cu/zn. I use Poly Copper and Poly Zinc from Uckele, 1/2 scoop each. I mix one container of each together and just use a full scoop. It's a SMALL scoop.

deltawave
Jan. 12, 2012, 10:11 AM
neither being related to being homozygous black as often thought

Makes sense, as my non-fading pony is not homozygous. Nobody knows what the big pinto is, genetically. :lol:

dangerbunny
Jan. 12, 2012, 12:13 PM
I have heard from friends with dark horses that none of the commercial "stay black" supplements do much on a horse that always fades.

I have heard of the copper supplementation helping, though haven't tried it personally.

rcloisonne
Jan. 12, 2012, 01:35 PM
Night turnout, extra copper (needs to be fed before the new coat starts coming in) and hosing sweat off at least once/day worked for me. Getting rid of sweat, more than anything else, is key. It acts like bleach.

Products such as "Black as Knight" (paprika) never did a thing to prevent fading in my experience. Waste of money.

Cancara
Jan. 12, 2012, 01:40 PM
I've had some luck with restoring blackness using Black Oil Sunflower Seeds and a seaweed supplement.
Also intending to stable during summer sun and/or use a fly sheet to prevent bleaching.

BarbB
Jan. 12, 2012, 06:11 PM
Mine stays black and lives out in the sun at 6000ft. I think a lot of 'black' horses are actually very dark bay and will bleach out eventually. I was told that paprika is good for keeping pigment in the coat. But I hate paprika and just got sick of handling and smelling it. I give her a little tumeric in her beet pulp as an anti-inflammatory agent and somebody just told me that it can help with pigment too. I need to find out if it tests as a forbidden medication.
I groom this horse with a little hair conditioner in a spray bottle of water and I think that may help combat sun fading also.

joiedevie99
Jan. 12, 2012, 06:44 PM
Night turnout- or the best UV blocking flysheet you can find. Choose a fly spray with sunscreen for the parts that stick out.

I've never seen a 'black' coat supplement that doesn't contain paprika- and I won't put a horse on something they can't show on.

Mouse&Bay
Jan. 12, 2012, 07:10 PM
I was a skeptic but am now a paprika believer.

Started feeding our black mare paprika (about 2 tbsp) with about 2 cups of black oil sunflower seeds every night about three weeks before her mare inspection. She needed to get shiny and dark.

It worked. Amazing to look at pictures and see how black she became in such a short period of time. This was September leading into the beginning of October. She was black and shiny!

It worked so well we decided to experiment on the dog - a german shepherd. I nixed the sunflower seeds (he wouldn't go for any of the vegetarian stuff!) and gave him about 1 tsp with his dinner. His pigment hugely improved and he got more of that deep copper/orange colour in his tan parts. <shrug>.

Paprika worked for us - just don't ask me to explain how/why etc. :)

FLeventer
Jan. 13, 2012, 01:27 AM
I use a fly sheet almost year round. If they are still fading then I leave them in from 10am to 2pm. They are out the rest of the time.

FatCatFarm
Jan. 13, 2012, 10:35 AM
I was a skeptic but am now a paprika believer.

Started feeding our black mare paprika (about 2 tbsp) with about 2 cups of black oil sunflower seeds every night about three weeks before her mare inspection. She needed to get shiny and dark.

It worked. Amazing to look at pictures and see how black she became in such a short period of time. This was September leading into the beginning of October. She was black and shiny!

It worked so well we decided to experiment on the dog - a german shepherd. I nixed the sunflower seeds (he wouldn't go for any of the vegetarian stuff!) and gave him about 1 tsp with his dinner. His pigment hugely improved and he got more of that deep copper/orange colour in his tan parts. <shrug>.

Paprika worked for us - just don't ask me to explain how/why etc. :)

Not saying this didn't help her color bloom, but your timing might have been more a matter of luck, since most black horses get blacker in the fall with their winter coat coming in. All the blacks I've ever owned do. I have a blue black Percheron mare who doesn't fade much, but still does to some degree when we go through a tremendously hot late summer like last year. Fall came though and her blue black color returned with dapples.

kasjordan
Jan. 13, 2012, 10:47 AM
Paprika absolutely helps my black walker stay black, But you have to start it on time and continue to use it. Start it NOW for this coming summer. You have to catch the summer coat growing in. Last summer I stopped using it, just laziness- he stayed black and kept his dapples, but nowhere near the pitch black he stays when he's on paprika. He's out basically 24/7/365 except for extreme weather. I'm a believer.

yellowbritches
Jan. 13, 2012, 10:47 AM
Are you sure the horse is a TRUE black? Most "black" horses are usually dark, dark, dark bay/brown and can look every bit of black at certain times of the year. I count my horse in this, who I refer to as "the little black horse" but he is definitely not a true black. He can be pitch black at times, but he also shows his true "brown" colors at other times. If the horse changes color, but has a shiny coat, and a healthy, silky texture, he's probably not bleaching or sunburnt...he's probably just a dark brown horse! A truly bleached, sunburnt coat has a very distinct look and feel...my guy never gets like that, but he will turn a little brown. Every other "black" horse I've know has been similar.

JB
Jan. 13, 2012, 11:36 AM
Agree that starting to feed something in Aug/Sept/Oct and attributing a darkening/glossing of the coat to the feed change is usually very coincidental. Those months are when the new, virgin, unbleached coat is making its presence well-known, and that coat will always look better than the "old and tired" Summer coat.

The only way to know is to start feeding these things early - Jan for the Summer coat, July for the Winter coat - and compare year to year.

I will disagree to some extent that if the color changes, but the coat stays healthy looking and shiny, then it's the color of the coat and not bleaching. When the Summer coat comes in blue-black, and by July it looks like a buckskin, that's bleaching, even when shiny.

That was July at 16 months - bleached. (http://equestriangardener.homestead.com/files/Rio/rio_1.JPG)


This was April 2 years later (http://equestriangardener.homestead.com/files/Rio/rio_conf_1.jpg)
This was May a year after that, with copper having been added to his diet (http://equestriangardener.homestead.com/files/Rio/rio4yoconf.JPG)

Daatje
Jan. 13, 2012, 01:02 PM
I don't. She ends up this wicked dappled shade of chocolate brown every year.

She'll be the shade of black that she'll be and fade she does!

baxtersmom
Jan. 13, 2012, 01:25 PM
I think a lot of 'black' horses are actually very dark bay and will bleach out eventually.


Are you sure the horse is a TRUE black? Most "black" horses are usually dark, dark, dark bay/brown and can look every bit of black at certain times of the year.

Just to clarify, this is just not genetically the case. Black horses carry the gene to manufacture black pigment (known as E) without the Agouti (A) modifier that restricts the location of the black pigment, and without any of the dilute modifiers (such as Cream or Dun).

The reason that some horses are non-fading black may actually have to do with an inability to create RED pigment. If I remember correctly, pheomelanin (red) breaks down into a number of component molecules when exposed to UV radiation, including one that oxidizes eumelanin (black pigment). The absence of red pigment in the hair shaft would also reduce the characteristic "burned" or "rusty" look of the coat in the event the eumelanin was oxidized by other chemicals.

Cielo Azure
Jan. 13, 2012, 01:37 PM
Own a non-fading one, or don't let them out in the sunshine, or accept that a healthy, happy horse is gorgeous no matter what color! :)

YEP!!! One year (when they first came out) I spent a fortune on Black as knight crap -money down the toilet. Paprika just doesn't do it.

If you want a black, black -keep them in the stall during the day in the summer and out at night.

I have 12 blacks here -all get excellent care and feed and supplements. Those that show, go in and those that don't stay out during the day from June to Sept.

Actually, mine all beg to come in during the summer. They don't like the Georgia great outdoors -once the temps go past 80. They are very, very sure that stalls are the "in" place to be for horses in the the hot summer.

JB
Jan. 13, 2012, 02:09 PM
Just to clarify, this is just not genetically the case. Black horses carry the gene to manufacture black pigment (known as E) without the Agouti (A) modifier that restricts the location of the black pigment, and without any of the dilute modifiers (such as Cream or Dun).

Actually, it is genetically the case :) "Black" was put in quotes because very, very often, what someone calls black, what might even LOOK black for all intents and purposes, really is, genetically, a dark seal brown.

This is a genetically brown horse (http://www.horse-genetics.com/images/Elriesgosiemprevive.jpg),
and would be called black by many, many people.

However, that's irrelevant to the fading, as I tried to explain, because no matter the color, the darker the shade the more potential there is for fading


The reason that some horses are non-fading black may actually have to do with an inability to create RED pigment. If I remember correctly, pheomelanin (red) breaks down into a number of component molecules when exposed to UV radiation, including one that oxidizes eumelanin (black pigment). The absence of red pigment in the hair shaft would also reduce the characteristic "burned" or "rusty" look of the coat in the event the eumelanin was oxidized by other chemicals.

The Eeaa horse is just as much black in looks as the EEaa horse, in the unbleached state. Each of them have the potential to fade. It's separate genetics which determine that

baxtersmom
Jan. 14, 2012, 12:16 AM
Actually, it is genetically the case :) "Black" was put in quotes because very, very often, what someone calls black, what might even LOOK black for all intents and purposes, really is, genetically, a dark seal brown.

This is a genetically brown horse (http://www.horse-genetics.com/images/Elriesgosiemprevive.jpg),
and would be called black by many, many people.

However, that's irrelevant to the fading, as I tried to explain, because no matter the color, the darker the shade the more potential there is for fading

The Eeaa horse is just as much black in looks as the EEaa horse, in the unbleached state. Each of them have the potential to fade. It's separate genetics which determine that

Is that "brown" horse A or At? In any case, I disagree that the majority of "so-called" "black" horses are actually carrying around an unusual Agouti allele that is somehow only partially expressed. There is no evidence that such an allele exists, at least not commonly, while there is a lot of evidence that both A and At generally produce a consistent phenotype (what we commonly call bay and seal brown).

And yes, E and EE are both black. That's what dominant means. And yes, there does not seem to be an additive effect in homozygous EE horses.

But the point you seemed to miss is that most E horses also produce pheomelanin in addition to eumelanin (the extension locus merely enables black pigment production via the eumelanin pathway, but the pheomelanin pathway is actually the 'default' pathway), and that it's been suggested that non-fading black horses may actually have a modifier that supresses pheomelanin production. This results in a blacker coat because A. UV can't break down pheomelanin to create H2O2 that subsequently oxidizes eumelanin, destroying it, and B. even if the eumelanin oxidizes by other means, the lack of red pigment in the hair shaft means that the coat doesn't get that rusty red look that is often mistaken for bay.

This may also be the reason that even very dark red-based coat colors (such as liver chestnut, and the bodies of Agouti modified horses such as bay and seal brown) don't fade to the same extent that black does - eumelanin is actually a more fragile pigment that's more prone to oxidation than pheomelanin.

JB
Jan. 14, 2012, 10:22 AM
Is that "brown" horse A or At?
Genetically tested as brown, so At


In any case, I disagree that the majority of "so-called" "black" horses are actually carrying around an unusual Agouti allele that is somehow only partially expressed. There is no evidence that such an allele exists, at least not commonly, while there is a lot of evidence that both A and At generally produce a consistent phenotype (what we commonly call bay and seal brown).
I never said anything about an unusual agouti that partially expresses :confused: I showed you a horse who truly looks black, but is E?Ata. He's brown. He happens to be a very, very dark brown, what most who are into color would call dark seal brown.

The stallion I bred to, Gatsby, is brown. Would you call him brown in this picture (http://foxdalefarm.us/images/Gatsby/Gatsby2-175.jpg)?

There is no consistency when it comes to brown. Some are obviously brown, including having dark chocolate points instead of black. Most browns have black points. Some browns are a rich caramel, like A Fine Romance (http://www.afineromance.ca/images/FredRoyalsm.jpg) with the tell-tale flank/barrel and facial brown. Others are very dark in the body, almost looking black, but have a very defined orange nose (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dd/Kevin_Tornado_Zlosyn_2005.jpg/220px-Kevin_Tornado_Zlosyn_2005.jpg) There is a wide range of what brown looks like, including being difficult to distinguish from a bay, depending on the shade



But the point you seemed to miss is that most E horses also produce pheomelanin in addition to eumelanin (the extension locus merely enables black pigment production via the eumelanin pathway, but the pheomelanin pathway is actually the 'default' pathway), and that it's been suggested that non-fading black horses may actually have a modifier that supresses pheomelanin production. This results in a blacker coat because A. UV can't break down pheomelanin to create H2O2 that subsequently oxidizes eumelanin, destroying it, and B. even if the eumelanin oxidizes by other means, the lack of red pigment in the hair shaft means that the coat doesn't get that rusty red look that is often mistaken for bay.
This may also be the reason that even very dark red-based coat colors (such as liver chestnut, and the bodies of Agouti modified horses such as bay and seal brown) don't fade to the same extent that black does - eumelanin is actually a more fragile pigment that's more prone to oxidation than pheomelanin.
That I will buy :)

chukkerchild
Apr. 26, 2012, 03:59 PM
Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I am looking into combating "the fade" on my dark, dark bay (almost black) Thoroughbred and am interested what copper-based supplements you used?

rmh_rider
Apr. 26, 2012, 04:10 PM
I feed Equipride.

I never feed any bagged grain. She eats timothy pellets, hay, or pasture.

I rinse my horse after each ride.

I keep my horse in the stall during the sunniest times of day. Like 9-3pm. And out at pasture the rest of the time. Or a total shaded area if the sun is out.

Mine is a black rocky mt. DNA'd black.

Right now she looks like she is wearing black silk.

katarine
Apr. 26, 2012, 05:07 PM
If you are going to feed paprika for color, just do it year round. It must be in their system while they are baking the next coat :)

This is the most informative thread re: paprika. Read Melyni's post:
http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=159189&highlight=copper&page=2

katarine
Apr. 26, 2012, 05:11 PM
Well hells bells paprika ain't got no copper at all. I'm confused. It does keep my horse's coat darker, but it's not the copper!

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/198/2

JB
Apr. 26, 2012, 05:51 PM
what copper-based supplements you used?


Poly Copper and Poly Zinc from Uckele, but I understand you can't get it up there :(

sorrelfilly721
Apr. 26, 2012, 06:01 PM
I had one non-fader and one fader. The fader used to fade wherever he would sweat, so if I could, I would rinse him after riding.

MeghanDACVA
Apr. 26, 2012, 07:01 PM
We had one bay (not black) that would not fade at all, even in the hot, bright, sweaty OK sun. I have a sl darker bay mare that bleaches every summer. Lives in the same field, eats the same feed, etc. She is dappled and shiney and almost black in the winter, and a gorgous dark dappled bay right now. She lives in fly sheets all summer. She will be dun colored by the end of August. Come the end of Sept when her winter hair is starting to come in she will be dark dappled bay again. Keeping her in doesn't change it. Sunblocks don't change it. Sweating doesn't change it. Wish I knew why she bleaches so badly and the other horse never did.

lolita1
Apr. 27, 2012, 07:00 AM
Rug it.

cowboymom
Apr. 27, 2012, 06:41 PM
Well hells bells paprika ain't got no copper at all. I'm confused. It does keep my horse's coat darker, but it's not the copper!

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/198/2

Your link says paprika is a good source of copper in the text but not down below in the chart. I'm new to this black horse business but since this http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y251/steele4/TWH%20Colt/100_0490.jpg was the latest picture I received of my newbie I am now in the market for shade and possibly paprika. I'm guessing that mild or inexpensive paprika is made from red bell peppers, not chiles, which is a possibility with paprika, and that is why it perhaps wouldn't work for some. If the paprika is made from ground chile then it would have the capsaicin which seems to be the ingredient that carries the copper. Other herbs high in copper listed on this site are marjoram, oregano, thyme, parsley and savory... also watermelon seeds and kale make the list which reminds me of a horse I had as a kid that loved watermelon and never faded. Molasses is on the list too. :) Paprika is a very mild chile so I can see where it would be easy to feed to horses...

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-copper-foods.php

In cows and goats, faded black to orange can mean copper deficiency also.

GraceLikeRain
Apr. 28, 2012, 12:07 PM
My mare is technically a seal bay but this year I am trying to keep her dark with good grain (tc senior), flax, fish oil, copper supplement (uckele's poly copper), night turnout, and daily rinses.

Last summer on night turnout and daily rinses she was bay by July http://s1222.photobucket.com/albums/dd486/GraceLikeRain1990/Weight%20and%20Muscle%20changes/?action=view&current=canter2.jpg
so I'm hoping this summer I can keep her a bit darker with these supplements.

cowboymom
Apr. 28, 2012, 02:36 PM
Wow she's pretty! great picture!

Copper really does bring out the color. We used to live on a ranch with a herd of Hollywood Gold broodmares, all shades of dun and dunalino... when they were on the Stablelix supplement their colors were so much more vivid.

GraceLikeRain
Apr. 28, 2012, 03:30 PM
Poly Copper and Poly Zinc from Uckele, but I understand you can't get it up there :(


I tend to bow down to your nutritional knowledge (I believe it was your recommendation 6+ months ago that got me started on the Poly Copper). Do you feel like the Zinc makes a huge difference?

huntershorizon
Apr. 28, 2012, 11:45 PM
There is actually a Black As Knight show supplement that doesnt test and works very well.

missyclare
Apr. 29, 2012, 12:21 AM
I would simply keep a horse in the barn during the summer to avoid the flies. I have my barn open and that's where they tend to be. Out at night because the sugar is lower in the grass, but never because of the sun bleaching coats. I have spring coats coming in now that are not darker, because the color is genetically true, despite what their genetics are. It's called good balanced nutrition. I also rehabbed a horse that was mousy brown in 5 months to jet black IN the summer sun and no blankets and he barely had a Grade 3 Body Score when he arrived.
Copper and zinc supplementation is the answer, but only if its balanced with iron. Otherwise, iron wins the day, plugging up uptake valves and making copper and zinc pass by, not metabolized. Iron is the real baddie. In the face of high iron, there will be a copper/zinc deficiency and it will be obvious right on the label vs. the iron. California Trace Minerals are an excellent suggestion with high numbers on copper and zinc and low iron. Good way to keep it simple. If you go with the straight Poly Copper and Zinc, you need a hay test to know exactly how much to supplement in order to meets needs and balance as well, which is what I do, but the California Trace will achieve it and keep life simple.
In nutrition class, the first thing we did was to balance the trace minerals. Students brought in pics quite fast. showing before and afters that were quite amazing in the color changes. Two most notable, were mousy browns. One went buckskin, dorsal line and all and the other went to brilliant palomino. Pretty amazing! Copper is very important for hoof health as well.
In my life of research, with myself and my peers, Paprika fell quickly through the cracks a long, long time ago. Paprika does not address nutrition and there is a problem because something is defcient or unbalanced with the nutrition.
Horses also have no requirement for fat whatsoever. Fat is fat...has no nutritional value whatsoever either. What horses require is essential fatty acids...the omegas...a perfect balance of omega 3 to 6 that fights inflammation everywhere in the body. This is flax seed. Fresh ground just before serving in a $10 coffee grinder. (4-6oz.) Not only will this give shine to the true color given by the traces, but a deep glowing shine...like seeing that shine on the horse across the field and only when he gets to the gate, do you realize just how dirty he is....that kind of shine. Stablilized flax in store bought feeds have lost their omega value. Sunflower seeds are the opposite, high in omega 6 to 3 and promotes inflammation. Chia seeds are also good in omega balance and you don't have to grind them.
Bring up the analysis of California Trace and pit it against all other labels and see for yourself. Balance of Iron/Copper/Zinc/Manganese should be 4:1:3:3. Pit the numbers against each other right on the label. Go to the serving directions to know what they are really getting and look for low iron touted. If its not listed, know that they are hiding it. If manganese is high, know that iron is also high, even though not listed. Iron is the real enemy. Copper and zinc are deficient in the face of high iron. Definitely go for low iron. Iron is in everything and 10x more available in water to the horse. When storage capacity has been reached, it goes running through the blood like rust. Mostly all of IR horses are already iron overloaded and is one of the first things that's needed to correct.
Hope this helps......

SquishTheBunny
Apr. 29, 2012, 08:16 PM
My dark bay goes out at night, and is in the stall during the day. He still bleached with the flysheet, but there were some days he couldnt wear it (ie. raining with sun)

bigbaytb
Apr. 30, 2012, 10:56 AM
I second black oil sunflower seeds and trace minerals that have copper and night turn out. Keeps my mare very black

ViewParadise
May. 13, 2012, 09:58 PM
I guess I'm in the minority here, but I feed BAK to two black horses who fade BIG TIME unless on BAK. It works wonders!! Love it. and it makes them soooo shiny too!!!

2horseygirls
Jun. 3, 2013, 07:33 PM
BUMP! Just got our first horse, a 7 year old black Percheron gelding. He did have severe anemia when he was 18-24 months old. The now air-fern couldn't keep any weight on - was treated with PowerHorse, then Red Cell which was tapered off, and he hasn't been on anything (and hasn't needed it) in the last 3 years.

ETA: He is on 24/7 turnout with run-in shelter on dirt paddock with free-choice 70% grass/30% alfalfa mix, and gets maybe 1-2# of Kent Equestrian’s Choice 12% CP Pellets (just so he has something and doesn't mooch).

Wondering about Black as Knight (already used on 2 horses in the barn) vs. California Trace? Thanks.

Lady Eboshi
Jun. 3, 2013, 10:26 PM
Now if you know a way to keep the WHITE ones from turning black, tell me 'n we'll both know! :D

Cindyg
Jun. 4, 2013, 12:03 AM
I was reading the first page of this thread thinking, "Deja Vu. I remember discussing every one of these suggestions a couple of years ago, and trying several of them." And then I noticed the thread date! LOL.

After doing forage samples, I do have mine on copper (and other minerals) now. Will be interesting to see how his coat comes in next year.

rmh_rider
Jun. 4, 2013, 11:18 AM
Now if you know a way to keep the WHITE ones from turning black, tell me 'n we'll both know! :D

Ok, I will tell. Here is what you do. Buy a dark horse, sell the white one. Works every time.

Belleaphant
Jun. 4, 2013, 11:47 AM
I'd suggest a UVA blocking sheet. My black horse has a Saratoga Horseworks fly sheet. It protects against biting insects AND repels the sun's rays. Her coat stays nice and black now!