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flea
Jan. 1, 2012, 04:16 PM
Have any of you evented a haflinger? They sound interesting and amateur friendly.

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 1, 2012, 04:47 PM
Okay, I'm finally ready to admit it...
Although I love mine dearly, they are not necessarily amatuer friendly. There are family friendly haffies out there, but it's been my experience with the breed that they (the majority) can be quite naughty little horses that you would not want for an inexperienced rider. (such as mine! and luckily I am not) :D

With that being said, he is an absolute blast, now that he's older(10) and it's taken 6 long years since I've had him of talented trainers and nearly daily riding to get us here. He has mostly been my first flight hunt horse (we belong to a very fast drag hunt with some 4' fences...yes he's done them... some haffies can be great jumpers). But, it was not an easy road. We have evented a bit, and it is my goal to eventually go Training with him, but we've had some issues with a previously undiagnosed injury. We'll be back out again when he's ready at BN.

Haffies are little drafts. They are very hard to get fit, but once they're there they are pretty easy to keep there. (Although, please note my "nearly daily riding" comment in the previous paragraph!)

They mature sllllooooowlllly. How old is your potential? Mine was 9 before he stopped the "baby sillies".

You will always be noticed at shows...good or bad. Haffies stick out!

Everyone will think you are a child...this may be a good or bad thing depending on your age.

If you have plans to do the low levels and have found a good haffie you'll be okay. They have great personalities, and mine would get in your pocket if he could, but he is definitely not for an inexperienced rider.

They are a great breed, really!, just make sure you do you homework, know your goals and know your potential haffie. I love mine dearly, and he will have a forever home with me. He cracks me up with his BIG personality and practical jokes (and yes, he is a practical joker). They are smart for sure. You have to be smarter.

Good luck! They are a great breed, but they are not for everyone.

Here are some of my favs of us (mostly hunting):
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1099039030714&l=9d1329b88f

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1319398459562&l=7c721f320d

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1547401199488&l=81e81cc558

excuse the position...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1547401599498&l=a3e91f7281

Yes, I fell off...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1356346903250&l=481d0506ce

My dressage face...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1187265036309&l=97fcf3d61f

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1187264956307&l=78c3b71872

suz
Jan. 1, 2012, 05:09 PM
i have a twelve yo mare who has the talent and athleticism but i'm not a good enough rider for her. i think i've found someone to campaign her this year, as i'd love to see her live up to her potential.
on the other hand, she sure doesn't care!

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 1, 2012, 05:26 PM
Suz, If you don't mind me asking, where are you located in New England? I'm in MA, and I know some really good people who are very good with haffies. I'm curious who you're working with. Feel free to PM me if you want. Us haffie eventers should stick together!

Another good thing about haffies...the most sure footed horses out there. I couldn't imagine doing some of the hunts I've done on any other horse than my haffie.

spacytracy
Jan. 1, 2012, 05:42 PM
Although I have never evented, I have a haffie cross with all the haffie qualities.

I would love another haffie if I could find a bigger one (15.2) in my price point. Mine is 14h. I love him to death. He is safe no matter how much I ride. Sure he's fitter and more responsive with regular riding but if you don't ride very often you don't have to be worried that he's going to be a nut. He gets lazier as time goes on. I do think he is far lazier inside than out. If I could get out more, I think he'd be far more forward. I know this because when I was boarding him, their indoor was not finished so we hacked out every ride and he was awesome after that.

I've jumped him to 3' (though not in a looong time) taken him on hunter paces, done a teeny bit of dressage and he's used as an IHSA horse for shows. He definitely has potential for more but I just don't have the nerves!!!

Here is mine at a hunter pace last year
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y56/spacytracy05/20101126%20-%20BCHP%20Hunter%20Pace/P1010616.jpg

They are easy keepers and will not cost you anything in feed or farrier. My farrier loves his feet. Mine gets 2 flakes/hay am and pm, and a handful of grain to shut him up.

He is a total PITA in a pony-naughty way, but if you love a super duper friendly personality they are really neat horses.

HHH- your haffie is AWESOME. How tall is he? He looks like he's quite a bit taller than the average - 15h??

bizbachfan
Jan. 1, 2012, 05:42 PM
Check out Tudor Oaks Farm facebook page (they are in Barrington Hills IL) They have lots of eventing Haffies. I have a 4 year old from there who is naughty but also a lovebug. I sent him to Dean Graham for 6 weeks at just turned 4 last spring and in 10 days he had him going nicely at all three gaits and doing baby stuff at the O'Connor's Fl cross country. He is naughty, pony like but also athletic, willing and talented.

He can jump with gusto or be super lazy depends on how you motivate him.

My sister is about to consider buying a haffie/paint cross who has already competed in 3 events and done well (also 4) He is a saint and very athletic. I think it depends on which Haffie you get but they can do it, no generalizations because I am a JRT person and though mine is a great dog I know there a nuts/bad JRTs too. So don't rule them out, but pick the right one.

bizbachfan
Jan. 1, 2012, 05:46 PM
Okay, I'm finally ready to admit it...
Although I love mine dearly, they are not necessarily amatuer friendly. There are family friendly haffies out there, but it's been my experience with the breed that they (the majority) can be quite naughty little horses that you would not want for an inexperienced rider. (such as mine! and luckily I am not) :D

With that being said, he is an absolute blast, now that he's older(10) and it's taken 6 long years since I've had him of talented trainers and nearly daily riding to get us here. He has mostly been my first flight hunt horse (we belong to a very fast drag hunt with some 4' fences...yes he's done them... some haffies can be great jumpers). But, it was not an easy road. We have evented a bit, and it is my goal to eventually go Training with him, but we've had some issues with a previously undiagnosed injury. We'll be back out again when he's ready at BN.

Haffies are little drafts. They are very hard to get fit, but once they're there they are pretty easy to keep there. (Although, please note my "nearly daily riding" comment in the previous paragraph!)

They mature sllllooooowlllly. How old is your potential? Mine was 9 before he stopped the "baby sillies".

You will always be noticed at shows...good or bad. Haffies stick out!

Everyone will think you are a child...this may be a good or bad thing depending on your age.

If you have plans to do the low levels and have found a good haffie you'll be okay. They have great personalities, and mine would get in your pocket if he could, but he is definitely not for an inexperienced rider.

They are a great breed, really!, just make sure you do you homework, know your goals and know your potential haffie. I love mine dearly, and he will have a forever home with me. He cracks me up with his BIG personality and practical jokes (and yes, he is a practical joker). They are smart for sure. You have to be smarter.

Good luck! They are a great breed, but they are not for everyone.

Here are some of my favs of us (mostly hunting):
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1099039030714&l=9d1329b88f

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1319398459562&l=7c721f320d

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1547401199488&l=81e81cc558

excuse the position...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1547401599498&l=a3e91f7281

Yes, I fell off...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1356346903250&l=481d0506ce

My dressage face...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1187265036309&l=97fcf3d61f

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1187264956307&l=78c3b71872

LOVE LOVE your pics, what a gorgeous Haffie!!!

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 1, 2012, 06:10 PM
HHH- your haffie is AWESOME. How tall is he? He looks like he's quite a bit taller than the average - 15h??

Spacytracy, I love your haffie! Your haf is such a great jumper! :) Very cute! I love to hunter pace, too. :D

You bring up good points; if you're keeping your haf at home they'll barely cost you anything. Mine eats beet pulp and first cut hay, but I'm at a boarding barn. If he was at home he wouldn't cost much to feed. They are very easy keepers.

Thanks, Bizbachfan, :D I have heard great things about Tudor Oaks, too. Definitely great advice to get in touch with them.

My haf is a big boy...I just sticked him again as I realized I hadn't measured him since he was 5 year old. Believe it or not, he is only 14.3 and 3/4ths. So, yes, almost 15hh, but has a BIG presence. I do call him a Sherman Tank!

Here's mine's pedigree: http://www.haflingerhorse.com/pedigree/PedigreeFindPub.php?horseid=20762

Anyone else have a haff?

Far_North_Equestrian
Jan. 1, 2012, 06:15 PM
I've seen a few out there - they seem like amazing little horses.

I have a Fjord X that leans towards the Fjord side of things (see the ling in my signature). He's very cool, and I will be eventing him next year. He will likely never go higher then training, but I love him.

spacytracy
Jan. 1, 2012, 07:24 PM
I estimate between he and the mini, they cost me like $75 a month in feed.

KateWooten
Jan. 1, 2012, 07:34 PM
Squeee ! I never knew the name of that place ... but look on the news page ...

http://www.tudoroaksfarm.com/news.html

It's Catherine and Bill :D She's one cool girlie !

flea
Jan. 1, 2012, 07:57 PM
A Fjord sounds fun as well!

belleellis
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:06 PM
I have a half haffy/Morgan. He is a rotten little *&^%. However he was starved and I assume also abused prior to me. The previous owner gelded him (himself no vet) at 5. So my guy has some issues at times. The neck is a lethal weapon on this horses.

However he is super cute and can be a ton of fun. Great mover and I always get stopped (at HT, CT, dressage, fox hunting, trail riding or hunter paces) and asked about him. I have only done dressage and a CT on him but am going to do some baby eventing this year. My trainer took him to a HT and he did really well. I have even camped overnight at the beach with him.

http://s57.photobucket.com/albums/g212/belleellis/TTC%20HT%20March%202011/
He is the short, fat bay hairy one jumping the small jumps in the photo album. The skinny bay is my trainers TB stud.

I have seen several haffies around NC at the HT with adults and kids.

Blugal
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:17 PM
I'm riding a Haflinger/QH cross, 4 years old (coming 5). He is one of the easiest horses I've worked with. His sire lives on site, and has an equally nice temperament. I have also ridden with a half brother (same cross, same sire) who has the same temperament.

He has currently only done one event at Starter level, which he won by over 10 penalties. However he is already schooling 3', skinnies, and more advanced flatwork. He has a hunter-style jump and canter and is very quiet. Someone is really going to luck out when he is sold!

ironbessflint
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:19 PM
Sorry for the hijack...HHH - is the mane on yours roached? I haven't shown breed shows in years, and my girl gets SO miserable during the summer heat that I'm contemplating pulling it this year. I have no idea where to start attacking it and I'm a bit nervous though. It's well over two feet long and I think I'd have to cut and THEN thin. My other girl's mane was always pulled, but she did NOT come from a good hair line. :lol: She had nothing to start with!


Back on topic...my girl would make a heck of an eventer, but I'm too chicken for it. She thinks I'm boring ;) She's a rock solid packer over any fence you point her at though. LOVES to jump.
Here's a couple dressage-y pics anyhow

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/247539_10100205777926398_21700103_49272869_5159473 _n.jpg

http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251704_10100205776569118_21700103_49272821_3614119 _n.jpg

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/249445_10100208855613688_21700103_49321851_1070803 _n.jpg

http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/247271_10100208855803308_21700103_49321858_4857010 _n.jpg

http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/311895_10100345173830888_21700103_50728228_2423387 57_n.jpg

http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/282043_10100297437459958_21700103_50111675_2209863 _n.jpg

As far as amatuer friendly...depends on the person. Mine is as safe as they come, but she's very tricky to ride well. That said, she adjusts herself so nicely. I can put a toddler on her and she takes tiny little steps and stays right under her rider. She throws exactly as much as I can handle. And then my trainer gets on and SHE has a blast with her. Neat little horse. I do think a complete novice on their own would be at her complete mercy, however. She'd be off eating grass somewhere.

Here's another one with some inspiration for you:
http://www.briarcroft.com/stallion.htm

Catie79
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:25 PM
A Fjord sounds fun as well!

I worked with a young Fjord for eventing for awhile. Cute, quiet, fabulous jumping form, and the dressage judges just ate him up. An 18 at his first two-phase. 18. I've never, before or since, gotten into the teens in dressage. Nothing made this little dude spook and the compliments were always pouring in.

But not, not, NOT an ammy friendly horse. When he decided he didn't want to do something? He would just start going backwards. Spur, crop, didn't matter, he'd just fly backwards. Eventually broke him of that one, but it wasn't pretty. Had very little in the way of work ethic and forget learning how to canter around a cross country course correctly. You spent all of your time kicking and praying that he was actually going to go.

As for the haffie, we have on at the barn in the school program. There's pictures of her going beginner novice in just adorable form and I believe she went novice. That mare is a saint, everyone loves her. Rumor has it that when she was young she was a hell raiser, so keep that in mind. As an older lady, she's an absolute packer but still has a lazy streak a mile wide. I personally love haffies, but they have to be really fit to go cross country or it's exhausting to keep them going.

rizzodm
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:30 PM
What Happy said.
Mine is not spooky, loves to jump, does lateral work and has a huge personality. But she knows every evasion in the world! Yes she is quiet but she is passive aggressive. For me she is perfect. I don't want to ride a hot horse that is going to spook at everything but I still want a challenge. My haffy provides that challenge for me. I ride her primarily dressage but I am starting to add jumping because she loves to jump. I think she would make an amazing eventer.

suz
Jan. 2, 2012, 12:08 AM
Suz, If you don't mind me asking, where are you located in New England? I'm in MA, and I know some really good people who are very good with haffies. I'm curious who you're working with. Feel free to PM me if you want. Us haffie eventers should stick together!

Another good thing about haffies...the most sure footed horses out there. I couldn't imagine doing some of the hunts I've done on any other horse than my haffie.

i'm in vermont. i'll pm you:).

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 2, 2012, 09:07 AM
Sorry for the hijack...HHH - is the mane on yours roached? I haven't shown breed shows in years, and my girl gets SO miserable during the summer heat that I'm contemplating pulling it this year. I have no idea where to start attacking it and I'm a bit nervous though. It's well over two feet long and I think I'd have to cut and THEN thin. My other girl's mane was always pulled, but she did NOT come from a good hair line. :lol: She had nothing to start with!


His is indeed roached. He had the long mane when he came to me, but it hadn't been well cared for and he hated it brushed. Like yours he would sweat terribly under that double mane in the summer, so I shaved it off. :) I use my body clippers with the 10 blade, easy peasy. Takes no time at all and the "mohawk" really fits his personality to boot.

Your haff is adborable!

kristinq
Jan. 2, 2012, 12:00 PM
HappyHoppingHaffy- Went through your FB album, Dukie is stunning! And I am drooling over those chocolate brown boots of yours.

I rode a Haffy mare for a few years and although I didn't event her, she was a blast and always kept me laughing. Even when I was falling off. I agree with (some of) them needing an experienced rider. She definitely needed a strong rider to keep her together and get after her ponytude.

eponacowgirl
Jan. 2, 2012, 05:37 PM
Draft crosses, in my experience, if not started with a good work ethic from a young age, will go out of their way and expend more energy FIGHTING than just giving in to what you're asking.

I have four in my barn and love them more than anything in the world. But MAN are they a PITA when they want to be!

Haffielover
Jan. 2, 2012, 09:54 PM
I have a 9 yr old incredible Haflinger and I've had him for a bit over 3 years. We started out primarily doing dressage, but in the last year we started low level starter trials. He LOVES to jump and can be very ornery...he needs to be reeled in and reminded who the boss is. But when he is on the ball, he's awesome. I stopped working with a trainer because I am trying to save money, but every now and then I will be taking a lesson.

He is not a beginner horse at all, and like the others have said, can be a total PITA. But he does tricks and gives me kisses....I will probably never own another breed. No recent pics. of us eventing. But I'll try to find something!

quietann
Jan. 2, 2012, 10:17 PM
Haffies seem to come in a lot of different types/sizes. I've met a couple of lovely lighter-weight Haffies but a lot seem to be more drafty. I've not been terribly happy riding them; the ones I have ridden have mostly been pig-headed and naughty, and "heavy goers" for lack of a better phrase. But they *do* enjoy jumping... I once took a trial lesson on an ancient Haffie mare I thought had no "go" until we jumped a tiny crossrail and boy she proved me wrong!

PebblesNana
Jan. 2, 2012, 10:27 PM
It's good to read about other Haffie owners with a similar naughty pony to ours! My daughter bought her Haffie several years ago and it has not always been pretty. She is just now getting over the silly baby naughty stuff and using her brain. And, she is 9. But, she is just adorable! And her jump is just so cute, and she loves to jump! My daughter has had to be very patient, work hard, shed some tears, and keep on when others may have quit. And that has been wonderful for her to learn....determination pays off!

Bouncingthetrot
Jan. 3, 2012, 08:16 AM
I recently sold my imported modern-type Haflinger. She had the best mind. We pulled her out of a field in June and she went to her first horse trial in October. She was so easy to train and was a people pleaser.

Her canter was difficult to cultivate and then to keep together. In many ways she was a much more difficult ride than a bigger horse. Her trot was very animated, forward, and ground covering and she definitely wouldn't have been an ideal horse for a beginner.

If you can decide you want a haflinger to event try to find a more modern-type Haflinger with a horse-like attitude.

bizbachfan
Jan. 3, 2012, 09:23 AM
Not to highjack thread but any advice on helping my Haffie's canter transitions? I struggle to get him to do a nice up transition and then keep him going at the canter in the arena. Out on the trail he is much more forward and can do great transitions to the canter.

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 3, 2012, 10:36 AM
Not to highjack thread but any advice on helping my Haffie's canter transitions? I struggle to get him to do a nice up transition and then keep him going at the canter in the arena. Out on the trail he is much more forward and can do great transitions to the canter.

If you've ruled out pain issues, and depending on what yours knows, I leg yeild into my canter transitions. Pushing him out in a leg yeild on a circle really helps my guy. Ensuring he is off my leg is also key.

My trainer also recently had us try haunches-in to the canter transitions, which he also liked and we found helpful.

I practice lots of transitions to keep him focused. He enjoys going off into his own little world...

bizbachfan
Jan. 3, 2012, 10:47 AM
thanks HHH

MissyA84
Jan. 3, 2012, 11:26 AM
I've been at Tudor Oaks Farm (Haflinger breeder) for about eight years, and though I've never owned one, I've known many Haflingers. I have to say I disagree about them being "naughty" and think a lot of it has to do with adjustment periods with new owners if applicable, and also previous handling. All of the Haflingers I've known are really an ideal "family horse" - sweet, trusting, friendly, and easy to ride. I've always been impressed with this breed and actually would recommend them for a young child or event horse. The barn uses Haflingers as event horses and though they aren't as athletic as a Thoroughbred, they are surefooted and have a good mind.

suz
Jan. 3, 2012, 12:15 PM
my mare's grandsire is from tudor oaks, n line.
she's developed a bucking habit during cantering that's got to be dealt with, so i'm going to take some lessons on her this spring. i figure we need to learn together to quit the behaviour for good. she has had chiro and is pain free as far as we can tell.
she def is more work than my horses, she's just so stubborn! and makes me really work for what i want.
she's also an incredible jumper and as sure footed as a goat--that's cuz i raised her with goats on the side of a steep mountain. so if nothing else she's my packer for the mountains----and bareback in the mountains is fun anyway!


oh, anyone know of a trainer who is particularly good with haffies in new england?

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jan. 3, 2012, 01:04 PM
I have to say I disagree about them being "naughty" and think a lot of it has to do with adjustment periods with new owners if applicable, and also previous handling.

^^ This. I think a lot of the haffie personality is due to how they're handled as youngsters. Mine was not started correctly and was bought and sold 6 times (!) before I bought him as a 4 year old. We have a very tight bond now, but it definitely took a long time for him to trust me to be the boss in all situations. He will still attempt to take over the ride when he's nervous. I just have to be a better rider.

If I was going to buy this breed again, I would go to a place like Tudor Oaks, or to someone who really knows this breed. They are a special kind of horse.

IronwoodFarm
Jan. 4, 2012, 01:40 AM
I think part of the issue with Haflingers is that they tend to attract novice riders who are looking for a quiet horse to ride. This happens all the time with Fjords. And as so many people noted, some Haflingers can be a wonderful choice for a novice and some are definitely not for a beginner. They are a small draft breed and this means they are strong. Some of them may look like my little pony with that flaxen mane, but they have other things in mind.

Hilary
Jan. 4, 2012, 08:39 AM
We have one - he is my mom's driving pony. He's 11 now, and we got him at 3. I about passed out when my mom said she'd found the horse she wanted and he was 3, but he's a really good egg. Calm, although he does have a bolt in him if he is truely terrified - it's happened only twice. And he is frightened of draft harness chains.

Usually his idea of a big spook is to flick both ears. I've ridden him a few times but it's not his forte - he LOVES driving, he loves the cones phase and the few mini-marathons he's done and he's ok in the dressage phase. This is his line:

http://www.haflingerhorse.com/pedigree/PedigreeFindPub.php?horseid=16354


He's only 13.3 but wide as a bus so I actually don't look all that big on him. He doesn't seem to understand jumping but I haven't tried all that hard. out on the trail he's got a great canter, but in the ring? Hey, lady, what are you doing up there, where's my harness?

He came from the Amish in Ohio and is a fun horse to have around - pleasant, no vices and has a great personality.


As far as ammy friendly, I can see where people get in trouble. When he doesn't understand something he just stops - he's not balking or being difficult, he just doesn't understand and that took me a bit to figure out.

Daisey-Bogie
Jan. 4, 2012, 09:58 PM
i agree, they are not naughty, that would be you r first thought if you had one that takes the gates off. Learned bery quick to tunr the top hing down. Mine went to my trainers while i am takin gcare of my mom, got bored, wanmtyed a challeneg I calle it took the gate off and then when wanted back in. almost ran my friend down trying to get back in with the buddy. Smart YES. Also agree must be strted correctly at a early age. I am cursed, my own doing broke mine when my trainer was in fl, competing. So I did not get her to go forard as much as I should have. My fault i and I know it, so we are working on more implusion. Excellent ground manners, but you do need to be the alpha mare in charge. Mine at the end of the fall was competing novice, schooling training anf trainer think she could go to pre-lim. She has one he*l of a jump. She is about 14.3 or taller, she is one of the more finer boned ones out there. Trim her up and if it wasn't for the color would look like a warmblood. love them.

smay
Jan. 5, 2012, 11:07 AM
Just whatever you do, do NOT cross a Morgan with a Haffie. You will end up with a naughty pony that has Eveready batteries and NEVER. GETS. TIRED! haha (only half kidding).

cheval convert
Jan. 6, 2012, 08:53 AM
I've seen a few out there - they seem like amazing little horses.

I have a Fjord X that leans towards the Fjord side of things (see the ling in my signature). He's very cool, and I will be eventing him next year. He will likely never go higher then training, but I love him.

I have a what we believe is a percheron/Fjord cross. (The percheron is defininte, the Fjord is a guess based on his and his dam's looks.) He looks very similar to your boy. He is a great little horse and I am hoping to finally be able to go to a very low level event. (I believe the class I wanted to go to was the "amoeba" class. lol)He can be very stubborn but once convinced that he does have to behave he is quite good. He is the horse that can safely pack me around a course.

Miichelle
Jan. 7, 2012, 03:06 PM
Breeding plays a HUGE roll in Hafflingers. My daughter's drafty Haffy is a PITA (but a well loved "keeper") with tons of ponytude. Several other Haffies we've had (with Sport Horse breeding) are lovely little horses with nice temperaments & SO CUTE!

Wits End Eventing
Jan. 7, 2012, 04:09 PM
The only pony we breed is a Haflinger. She is amazing. We bought her out of a field as an unworked 8-year-old. The first session of getting her to go forward involved a lunge whip.....however, once she saw her first jump, she was sold. We had students ride her on and off, and they all had a blast. One misunderstood which line I said to jump and did a 3'9" skinny with a 3 stride turning line to a corner perfectly. She cliniced Training level with Jim Wofford and was the only horse who got every exercise right the first time WITH horse striding of course although she is only 13.2 hands. He loved her. She is SMART. Will get in or out of any type of fencing except our stallion enclosure...... She lives on air unlike our other mainly TB mares who eat us out of house and home, and she LIVES TO EAT. Her first son by German Sport Pony Voyager is a mini carbon copy of Pazia. He thinks he is 17.2 hands. Wouldn't sell her for the world!

bizbachfan
Jan. 7, 2012, 04:14 PM
I have to say I think they are one of the smartest breeds I have ever met. As long as they respect you they are awesome!

The Golden Snitch
Jan. 7, 2012, 06:39 PM
If you can focus the mischeviosity, you are good to go. These ponies are solid citizens and great and SENSIBLE. My guy is probably the most unflappable horse in the whole barn and everyone loves him. He is tough in dressage because they tend to be ungifted at the canter (mine is no exception). Their big strong necks make them difficult to keep bent and soft/supple. My pony can be a pig headed bully one day and a perfect (halo visable) angel the next day... but he has more halo days than bully days by a long shot. He loves jumping and is very very honest and is pretty much point and shoot which is priceless on cross country.

I have had mine 4 years and he is the first horse I ever knew I would keep forever. I will honestly never have another breed.

And, I'm certain he scored higher on the SAT's than I did!!! So you have to be on your game.

Here's a link to my youtube page so you can see some helmet cam and early dressage stuff! My opinion is once you go Haflinger, there's no turning back. They make riding fun and that's what it's all about.

http://www.youtube.com/user/supersquid911/videos

feetofclay1678
Jan. 7, 2012, 07:12 PM
You can definitely event a haffie! I havent personally, but the girl who ran my last barn had a little haffie with LOADS of personality and he was a little jumping machine! his dressage could of used some work, but it wasnt ever a priority of their rides. i think they can make you into a pretty good little rider because they are smart as the dickens! i know it took them quite a while to get him into shape, but once he was there he held it pretty well. when the BM left our barn, she gave him to a younger boy who loves him to death...and has fun with all the shenanigans:)

Miichelle
Jan. 7, 2012, 08:21 PM
FYI don't get a Haffy if you want to blend in or be left alone. Haffies are cuter in person than in pictures and everyone wants to pet them and ask you about them. My daughter's gelding was the biggest ice breaker back when she was a VERY shy little girl.

ECEventer
Jan. 8, 2012, 06:56 PM
My gypsy vanner is just starting his lower level career and has quite the personality. He loves to jump and is super tidy but his endurance is just nver going to be that of a TB. I imagine haffies are pretty similar. Although I know Lance will never take me over BN, I love my little naughty pony!

trabern
Jan. 12, 2012, 01:07 PM
My daughter, who just started schooling eventing and is a jumper, rides a Haflinger mare (one that was sired by Tudor Oaks original stud, Nobleman of Tudor Oaks) that is just a hair under 14.2 and of the sporty build. You can see pics and video of their journey at the blog in the sig line.

Honestly there is nothing this horse can't do. I (the mom/trainer) fox hunt her, hard. She can really jump. She is like and air fern to feed. She loves the grooming attention of girls who in turn love her big hair. I give lounge lessons to newbies and experienced riders alike on her with great success. She drives, too. Once she's fit, it is impossible to wear her out.

That said, having and training a haffie is NOT like most other horses. Stubborn as a shetland, and just as naughty if you let her. Clever, extremely clever. Solid, although ours is certainly more hot than she is a plodder, but not spooky. Strongest head/neck of any horse I've ever ridden. Extremely social and food-oriented (watch your sandwich).

She actually just pushed through low jumps and cross-bars at first, making us all think she was unfit as a jumper or foxhunter. Then we got her fit and put her to big jumps and solid obstacles, and she jumps beautifully (although she'll still bonk over anything 18" or under, naughty thing).

She's worth her weight in gold around here, and actually kind of looks like gold.

TBKate
Jan. 12, 2012, 08:56 PM
My trainer had a haflinger in the barn for several years who evented up to Training. He probably could have gone Prelim, but the money/time weren't there for his rider. As others have said--SUPER athletic, surefooted, and braver than all get out. He loved to jump; the higher the better! Over 4' with knees literally to eyeballs. He ate up cross country. Total lovebug with the (apparently) trademark impish Haffie personality.

He was, however, a pretty hot ride. Getting him round and soft at dressage took more finesse than most of the TBs I rode. He had a questionable background before he came to us, and he had a definite spook, and a definite opinion on things! Nonetheless, I wish to this day I'd been able to buy him. He was amazing to ride, but NOT a kids horse! He ended up selling to do the Pony Jumpers--all the jump in a smaller package ;)

Pictures here: http://betteryetequine.com/horsessold.html scroll down to Peanut.

DevilsAdvocate
Jan. 20, 2012, 01:39 PM
I have a Haffie/Morgan who is out of Aristocrat TOF. He's a super fun boy! We are planning to do our first event at Full Moon Farm on March 17th. We shall see how it goes! Here's a picture of him..

http://i1097.photobucket.com/albums/g342/ooktdoo/a1b1f077.jpg

http://i1097.photobucket.com/albums/g342/ooktdoo/harpobody.jpg


Squeee ! I never knew the name of that place ... but look on the news page ...

http://www.tudoroaksfarm.com/news.html

It's Catherine and Bill :D She's one cool girlie !