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ChelsaeJo
Dec. 30, 2011, 11:25 PM
Hi there everyone (thanks for reading, first off.)

So, I've been riding since, well, before I remember. I ride Western Pleasure, Speed, Jumpers, Hunters, Dressage and Eventing. I have owned, finished, started, trained and sold horses of all disciplines. I own my first horse (still), an Arabian Paint cross mare, she was my speed horse and now is lovingly passed down to my little sister to start training on, and my 16 year old OTTB who's my eventer/dressage boy.

I am experienced in all the above mentioned disciplines with show-time except for combined training. I mean, I've done my Dressage tests, I've done my jumpers, and I've jumped some Cross country courses, but I haven't shown an actual event yet. I am buying a new horse here soon and was hoping you guys would help me out a bit? :) (The horse is for eventing, as this is what I have my scholarship/funding for.)

My first option is a Frisian x Arabian-paint, going on 5 years old mare.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6j0yqRpgizY&feature=g-upl&context=G21da609AUAAAAAAAAAA
That's her just being free lunged a week ago. Her first time out in a while.
I haven't been out to see her (yet), but soon. I have talked with her owner and her trainer frequently, and the lady is only selling due to having a baby.
I was reading a lot about the Friesian Sport Horses in eventing and all I've read was nay-sayers.
How do you feel about her in the sense of movement/structure/etc.?

The second (and third) choices are here.
http://www.luckystarranch.org/sales.cfm
This past summer I did go out and see them. I like the lighter ones personality and movement better. But again, what do you guys think?

And what other breeds do you think I should look into? I DO like warmbloods, and I have to have a bigger horse as I have VERY long legs. (I'm 5'6 and 115 lbs).
I love Hano's, Irish Draughts, Dutch Warmbloods, Belgian Warmbloods, etc.
Any ideas?

Also, I do not want a horse any older than 6. Should I get a younger (weanling/yearling) and bring it up with a trainer (I'm training with top notch trainers here in MI, both Dressage and Eventing), or should I stick with an older (3-6 years) and finish it off?

Thanks in advance! :)

Chelsae Jo

Far_North_Equestrian
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:30 AM
Even though I don't have one - I'm a big fan of nicely put together OTTBs. You get one of them at 4-5 years old - put a full winter in on them an you can possibly be out schooling/showing the following season.

IMO - buying a weanling/yearling is a bit of a crapshoot, because they have 2-3 years where you are paying for their upkeep, but so much can go wrong before you've even had a chance to sit on their back. If you're after REALLY high quality it can be worth it, but there are so many nice TBs or other unbroke 3 year olds out there that can go into work NOW that i'd be likely to forgo a youngster unless I had my own farm.

ChelsaeJo
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:34 AM
I do love my OTTB, but I like the bigger builds of the Warmbloods. If I found the right TB I would buy it, that's for sure. My guy is the apple of my eye. <3

I actually do have my own farm, so I would be the care-taker if I did get a younger horse. But I'm more with you, there's so much that could go wrong or the training not go right where as an older horse I can start training on and potentially show this summer. Although this summer is the big hoorah for Murphy (OTTB) and I. :)

Thanks for your input!

smokygirl
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:48 AM
1

ChelsaeJo
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:53 AM
Just looking for my eventer. I'm half-retiring my speed horse to my little sister, (she's my Arabian cross.) I rode a 16hh Arabian, he wasn't bad for my leg, but I still do like a bigger build.
The Friesian cross has some Arabian in her, which I like. And it's apparent in her nature. It's the one with the video attached.

smokygirl
Dec. 31, 2011, 05:04 AM
1

KJackson09
Dec. 31, 2011, 08:07 AM
IMO eventing is (well was) made for the more agile and athletic horses. I have had experience with the heavier warmbloods in the eventing world and they tend to do well but since they are heavier the TBs tend to have an advantage. I have an OTTB that has the bigger body. They are harder to find, but are out there.
I would definitely go with a tb cross with a warmblood maybe.

A note-- remember the better your score in dressage the better off you are in placing (not that thats your goal) -- more or less hinting you definitely want something with nice movement and good dressage basics.

I would go with something thats 4-6 yrs old, to finish. I personally would have more fun with that if you want to get out there and start showing.

good luck!

horsetales
Dec. 31, 2011, 09:46 AM
Admitedly I am biased to the Irish Draught and their crosses. Being longer leged the extra body will take up more leg than an equally tall TB and the cross can bring in the best of both breeds. You can find Irish crossed with TB, WB or Arab. I love the heart and mind mine have shown me as they come along. I have a 4 yr old just starting out and she is kind with a lot of heart and to me she looks to have the best of the TB and Irish.

Beam Me Up
Dec. 31, 2011, 09:57 AM
There are successful OTTBs, Warmbloods (of all the types you listed), Irish at all levels of eventing. Friesans/Warlanders (or the baroque type in general) are less popular, which isn't to say they couldn't be successful, but are usually not known for their gallops.

I would probably not limit myself to just one breed, but go out and evaluate the individual horses' movement, jump, etc. There will be better and worse prospects of all those breeds.

As for age, I personally like to evaluate their adult conformation, and am impatient to ride, so I'd go older 4+, but that's just me.

Good luck!

pheasantknoll
Dec. 31, 2011, 10:26 AM
Many of your choices will be defined by your budget unless it's unlimited;). Warmbloods and Irish Drafts will be more expensive, OTTB less so, and arab crosses even less. Also, although I have and love an arabian, they are typically not scored well in the dressage portion of eventing unless they are anglo-arab.

How fortunate you are to be looking for your next eventer. Good luck and have fun trying lots of horses!

equinedriver
Dec. 31, 2011, 11:53 AM
I have two Friesian crosses, one half morgan, one mutt (half friesian, quarter dutch eighth arab eighth saddlebred). I do combined driving, which doesn't require maybe as much continuous speed as eventing, but requires a much longer duration, most marathons are almost an hour, the last section with hazards over 30 min instead of 10 min max.........but I have absolutely no issue with conditioning and stamina. You don't say what level you hope to go to, but I would think this mare would be fine for lower to mid level eventing with no problem.

I drove warmbloods exclusively before getting the two friesian crosses. I don't see any difference in the stamina. I was an eventer in my previous life, back in the dark ages when training level was the first level you could enter............

Debbie
Dec. 31, 2011, 12:41 PM
I liked the Friesian cross mare more than I was expecting to, but I don't think her movement indicates a good jump. You should for sure free jump her before even thinking of proceeding. I'd definitely go with a 4-6 year old and either a warmbood/TB cross or an Irish/TB cross. There's definitely a reason that the current sport is dominated by these types. My (short) Irish experience was not pleasant, but others certainly rave about them.

I'm also an OTTB fan and you can certainly find them with size if you go looking. I highly recommend shopping one step removed from the track - Mapleshadefarm.net, Three Plain Bays, Tebogo, Canter Mid-Atlantic all come to mind as opportunities to get super nice horses after they've transitioned from the track so you can be much more assured if they will suit your goals.

I'm currently leasing a Warmblood/TB cross and that is what I will go looking for when he sells and I need to find a horse of my own. He's got the movement to score very well in dressage and a nice gallop. Likely not an upper level horse, but that's not my goal.

Have fun shopping!!

Bobthehorse
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:21 PM
I wouldnt look for breed, but rather a type. You obviously want a bigger horse (though at 5'6'' you dont really need much bigger than 16h) and something that would have the best chance at being a good eventer. So define your height range, and look for an individual that suits the sport (depending on the level you hope to reach) - good mind, correct mover, agile, athletic, eager to please, naturally balanced canter, easy jump. I think if you limit yourself to breeds you miss the big picture, and if you find a type you like, its not important what in it.

ChelsaeJo
Dec. 31, 2011, 01:48 PM
I have an OTTB that has the bigger body. They are harder to find, but are out there.
I would definitely go with a tb cross with a warmblood maybe.

I actually inquired about quite a few last night. Waiting for responses. :)


A note-- remember the better your score in dressage the better off you are in placing (not that thats your goal) -- more or less hinting you definitely want something with nice movement and good dressage basics.

Dressage, IMO, is the foundation of all other riding. So it's important for me to find something that will excel in Dressage.


Admitedly I am biased to the Irish Draught and their crosses. Being longer leged the extra body will take up more leg than an equally tall TB and the cross can bring in the best of both breeds. You can find Irish crossed with TB, WB or Arab. I love the heart and mind mine have shown me as they come along. I have a 4 yr old just starting out and she is kind with a lot of heart and to me she looks to have the best of the TB and Irish.

I inquired about a few Irish TB crosses last night, I really like a couple of them (on paper). Of course, I'm not doing anything until I see them and have my trainer approve. (I have a bad habit of getting my heart attached when I'm shopping for me. I can go around and help people pick out new horses and know which is best, but for me I'd just take the first one because I fell in love with it. ;))


I would probably not limit myself to just one breed, but go out and evaluate the individual horses' movement, jump, etc. There will be better and worse prospects of all those breeds.

As for age, I personally like to evaluate their adult conformation, and am impatient to ride, so I'd go older 4+, but that's just me.

Definitely TRYING not to limit myself, haha. Always easier said then done, I think. ;) But as I do have 2 horses older already, and one eventer, I don't feel the need to "rush".. but I can say that now, I'm sure it will change when I get my new one and am all excitable. =p



Many of your choices will be defined by your budget unless it's unlimited. Warmbloods and Irish Drafts will be more expensive, OTTB less so, and arab crosses even less. Also, although I have and love an arabian, they are typically not scored well in the dressage portion of eventing unless they are anglo-arab.

How fortunate you are to be looking for your next eventer. Good luck and have fun trying lots of horses!

Good point! My budget is definitely not unlimited, although I can afford a substantial amount. Ohh, more then 10,000 is a little over, but for the right one I could probably find a little wiggle room. :)

Thank you! :)


You don't say what level you hope to go to, but I would think this mare would be fine for lower to mid level eventing with no problem.

That parts undecided, I would like a horse that CAN move up the ranks if I decided to go that way, but doesn't have to. Prelim. is most likely my max.


I liked the Friesian cross mare more than I was expecting to, but I don't think her movement indicates a good jump. You should for sure free jump her before even thinking of proceeding. I'd definitely go with a 4-6 year old and either a warmbood/TB cross or an Irish/TB cross. There's definitely a reason that the current sport is dominated by these types. My (short) Irish experience was not pleasant, but others certainly rave about them.

I have seen a video of her jumping, she's actually really tight kneed, not sloppy at all. Very nice form. (If I do end up with her, I'm definitely doing a trial period).

I also had a pretty bad experience with an Irish. But yes, people do LOVE their Irish's, so it's worth a shot. Especially a cross.


So define your height range, and look for an individual that suits the sport (depending on the level you hope to reach) - good mind, correct mover, agile, athletic, eager to please, naturally balanced canter, easy jump. I think if you limit yourself to breeds you miss the big picture, and if you find a type you like, its not important what in it.

Absolutely! I'm definitely not a "breed snob" or anything. I'd pick up a mutt if it was the right horse for me. ;) Unfortunately (and this is where I need the most help) I love my stupid greys. =.= it's so hard not to pick because the horse is "pretty", although I know I wont.

Thank you everyone who responded. I have some more links of horses that I'm interested in.

AKB
Dec. 31, 2011, 03:46 PM
What about an Irish Draught/Arabian cross from Playland Farm in MD. We have a 3 1/2 year old from them, and he is a good boy.

slp2
Dec. 31, 2011, 03:53 PM
Regardless of breed, I think it's important to look for a horse that has a good "brain" and elastic gaits. I have seen several horses who did not have an ideal conformation for jumping, or dressage, but were highly successful because they loved their job.

If you want a young horse, I would look for one that is under saddle and ideally has done some x-c schooling (water, banks and ditches being most important, just so you know if these are going to pose any major problems). A truly water phobic horse is always going to be a challenge to event. Outside of that, I'd like to see how they react to new things (say, slowing adding more jumps to a grid, or adding a colorful filler to a jump). I'm ok if they make a mistake, but do they make the same mistake again? Or do they learn from it? Do they get worried about more challenges? Or do they take things in stride? Another thing I like to see is how they are when being ridden when there are distractions (other riders, horses goofing around in a turnout nearby). Eventing requires a lot of training and focus and horses that like to work and pay attention to their rider are much easier to bring along.

In terms of gaits, the most important is the canter. A horse with a good canter will generally have a good jump. You can improve the trot, but a poor canter is much harder to change.

Regarding specific breeds, (these are generalizations, and there are always exceptions) but the baroque style horses (such as a Friesian) tend to have poor canters. They were bred to pull carts (as were the old style warmbloods) However, they are far from their cart pulling days and many have been refined with some Tb blood thrown in. Arabs can have decent gaits, but sometimes can be poor jumpers due to their flat croup. They usually jump with a very flat back and little bascule. Again--there are exceptions to that rule and crossed with a Tb, you could have a really nice horse.

Interestingly, the horse I owned that was best "built" for the job (happened to be a Hanoverian / Tb cross) was the biggest chicken on x-c and I ended up selling him as a dressage horse. So again, I defer to the "good brain" above all else. Good luck in your search!

scubed
Dec. 31, 2011, 03:54 PM
If you can find it 3/4 tb with the rest a lighter wb breed or irish. Otherwise, find a fancy 3-4 year old tb

ChelsaeJo
Dec. 31, 2011, 04:53 PM
This sure is a daunting task. =\

The owner of Maazi (Friesian X Arabian x Paint mare) is going to haul her to an indoor near her for me to go see. 5 hour road trip, yippie. At least I have my new truck! :)

Out of a Friesian Stallion and a Half-Arabian x Paint mare.
She's coming on 5 years old.
60 days of professional training.
Very sweet, puppy-dog personality.
15.3 MAY top out at 16.0 (hopefully).

Here's a link to another video of her.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06ht-4OPuKs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06ht-4OPuKs (if the above didn't work, just copy and paste)

I just asked her a ton of questions, so I'll post those when I get them.

But so far on her what are the positives and the negatives?

Thanks!

Debbie
Dec. 31, 2011, 05:48 PM
Based on the videos, I wouldn't be driving five hours to look at her as an event prospect with an eye toward prelim. Riding a horse with the correct conformation for the job is like starting several steps ahead. She's inverted and tight through her back. Due to her breeding her neck is set on high. I don't often find much value from free lunge videos because all too often the horse is too amped up and the enclosure is too small to really showcase their gaits. I'd like to see her under saddle to see if she uses herself differently with contact. She is very pretty and looks powerful and catty. Keep us posted!

slp2
Dec. 31, 2011, 06:34 PM
Sorry. I would not drive 5 hours to see a horse that has had 60 days training (under saddle I presume) and they don't have any video footage of them under saddle. Huge red flag to me. Any horse can be free lunged and look fancy. She is 5 years old, I would be asking why they waited so long to back her. While I don't think it's a huge issue to back a horse at a later age--this horse is a real unknown in terms of their aptitude for eventing.

While I wouldn't rule her out--for me, there's just too many unknowns here. She isn't the ideal breed or conformation for eventing, and is behind (for her age) in her training IMO. These videos do not tell you a thing about whether she will be a capable jumper or willing eventer.

event_ryder
Dec. 31, 2011, 08:10 PM
Some interesting reading to give you some ideas of what to look for.

http://www.jwequine.com/pdf/conformation_for_an_eventer.pdf

http://www.jwequine.com/pdf/Conformation-Eventer.pdf


I also think temperament plays a huge part. They can be built to do the job but have no desire to do it. That being said- my paint mare had a great heart, tried her best but her conformation held her back. She simply wasn't built to do the job. New boy is built to event and i'm lucky to have a temperament to match. He loves his job. I'm not fussy breed wise, but I do think a well built TB or TBx is going to have an advantage with the XC.

and adding this as it had some interesting thoughts on TB's breeding/confo in relation to sport that I found while perusing the site.
http://www.jwequine.com/syndicates.html

Justa Bob
Jan. 1, 2012, 02:01 AM
The biggest question for an event horse is not breed. The biggest hurdle in choosing any green, untrained horse is whether it will be comfortable on the XC course, in water, and jumping. If you don't know this before you buy a horse, you are rolling the dice. And you may spend all your time trying to "train" a horse that will always spook/refuse/freak on XC.

There are so many threads asking when to call it a day with a given horse that would be happier in another career.

If you can look at sale horses that have been successful in some schooling on XC, water, and jumping (trail horses are better bet too!) -- you will have a much better chance of training for eventing. Otherwise you just have to hope -- and alter your plans if the horse is not a happy eventing camper.

Best wishes!

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 1, 2012, 02:42 AM
Based on the videos, I wouldn't be driving five hours to look at her as an event prospect with an eye toward prelim. Riding a horse with the correct conformation for the job is like starting several steps ahead. She's inverted and tight through her back. Due to her breeding her neck is set on high. I don't often find much value from free lunge videos because all too often the horse is too amped up and the enclosure is too small to really showcase their gaits. I'd like to see her under saddle to see if she uses herself differently with contact. She is very pretty and looks powerful and catty. Keep us posted!

I'm not a fan of just free-lunging videos, either. I agree, it doesn't show squat about how they will be under saddle.


Sorry. I would not drive 5 hours to see a horse that has had 60 days training (under saddle I presume) and they don't have any video footage of them under saddle. Huge red flag to me. Any horse can be free lunged and look fancy. She is 5 years old, I would be asking why they waited so long to back her. While I don't think it's a huge issue to back a horse at a later age--this horse is a real unknown in terms of their aptitude for eventing.

While I wouldn't rule her out--for me, there's just too many unknowns here. She isn't the ideal breed or conformation for eventing, and is behind (for her age) in her training IMO. These videos do not tell you a thing about whether she will be a capable jumper or willing eventer.


Absolutely. She had 60 (maybe 90?) days of training in 2010 and when she got back Jami (owner) found out she was pregnant. She said she was going to use her as a dressage mount, but is selling now because she has a 7 month old daughter.

I'm not having much luck in searching around here, even in a 300 mile radius. Blah. So I mind as well go and take a look-see; I just have to take my trainer so I don't make an impulsive decision. Eek!


Some interesting reading to give you some ideas of what to look for.

http://www.jwequine.com/pdf/conforma...an_eventer.pdf

http://www.jwequine.com/pdf/Conformation-Eventer.pdf


I also think temperament plays a huge part. They can be built to do the job but have no desire to do it. That being said- my paint mare had a great heart, tried her best but her conformation held her back. She simply wasn't built to do the job. New boy is built to event and i'm lucky to have a temperament to match. He loves his job. I'm not fussy breed wise, but I do think a well built TB or TBx is going to have an advantage with the XC.

and adding this as it had some interesting thoughts on TB's breeding/confo in relation to sport that I found while perusing the site.
http://www.jwequine.com/syndicates.html


Ahh! Thank you! I'll read those as soon as I send this out! :)


The biggest question for an event horse is not breed. The biggest hurdle in choosing any green, untrained horse is whether it will be comfortable on the XC course, in water, and jumping. If you don't know this before you buy a horse, you are rolling the dice. And you may spend all your time trying to "train" a horse that will always spook/refuse/freak on XC.

There are so many threads asking when to call it a day with a given horse that would be happier in another career.

If you can look at sale horses that have been successful in some schooling on XC, water, and jumping (trail horses are better bet too!) -- you will have a much better chance of training for eventing. Otherwise you just have to hope -- and alter your plans if the horse is not a happy eventing camper.

Best wishes!

These are very good points. Thanks! :)
I definitely *could* go just into dressage if I wanted to, albeit I'd lose my scholarship. But I'd rather not buy a horse saying, "Well if THIS doesn't work, then I'll do that."

So my search is going horribly! Haha. Does anyone know of any prospects in the MI, IN, OH area? Could go farther if it was the right horse. :)

Thank you all so much, you're helping immensely!

Hope you all had a HAPPY and SAFE new years! :)

RunningwaterWBs
Jan. 1, 2012, 07:24 AM
Please check your PMs. :)

glfprncs
Jan. 1, 2012, 08:29 AM
I just sent you a PM as well.

not again
Jan. 1, 2012, 08:38 AM
I didn't take your poll! I would be more concerned with the ancestry of your future event horse in terms of competition success than with a particular registry. You don't go cross country successfully on the papers; you have to get around on the actual horse. Look for horses from proven performance lines and don't get sucked in to the glamour/marketing of a particular registry.

judybigredpony
Jan. 1, 2012, 08:46 AM
I don't know you budget but you will get more horse for your buck w/ an OTTB and if you shop hard and wisely IMHO and experiance as a seller...you can and will find a horse that will pass a PPE and have enough skills in place for you to seamlelessly move along.

Should the horse not be your special ride you can sell it on and buy another horse without blowing your whole fund.

If you start out with a horse who doesn't have a conformation limitation to overcome (to many to mention) and has a willing temperment and good mind your way up already.

While baised towards OTTB, they are plentyful, affordable, proven in the sport and a huge selection in terms of conformation and temperment to select from in a relatively small shopping area. Even color, chrome, and size/bone.

When buying cross breed young stock you don't always know what you will end up with even in same families.

Warmblood are better option if you don't want a TB you can pretty much be assured of what the final product will mature to in appearance.

enjoytheride
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:05 AM
You have a pretty wide selection of horses and you seem pretty young, so I'd sit down with a trainer and discuss realistic goals and price range. With a budget of 10K you should be able to purchase something with eventing experience, which you need if you really do plan on reaching prelim and have no current eventing experience.

I like the arab cross mare (I am an arab person), but she doesn't have efficient movement for galloping (arabs usually have excellent stamina and get fit easily, but fresians are the opposite) and she's not even started under saddle.

I'd buy her if she was registered as a 1/2 arab because I like arabs but she'd have to be cheap because although she is pretty she is apparently so green there are no videos of her under saddle. She'd be a fun project you could show in arab shows and lower level eventing. You need to look at your realistic goals and pick a horse designed for that.

LaraNSpeedy
Jan. 1, 2012, 09:55 AM
I think you need to think about your size and what level you want to ride in. Like, I have this AWESOME agile 14.1 Teddy Oconner type sport pony that jumps 3 feet cross country as smooth and easy as any other horse with scope to go higher. He may not go over Training Level but then, USUALLY it takes a lot of time and work to GET to training level and whatever horse you buy, you are liekly going to start BN, then advance to N and then advance to Training and it likely will take you several years to do it - AND that is how it goes. Most people dont buy a nice hrose and go do Prelim first year.

But I am a petite adult. I have a 16 year old 5'7" rider who enjoys riding this horse too but she got a very athletic on the hot side Paint and that horse is awesome for eventing.

BUT we are dealing with mental issues - he has separation anxiety and though alll the talent is there to go to prelim - he is a bit dangerous with some issues. THAT SAID - something to think about when buying a very young horse - you dont know if you put all the training in the world on the horse and if the horse will indeed be able to do that.

I like when picking an eventer for someone getting their first event horse - to have the horse be old enough that I can tell the horse is brave - doesnt have go-to-places issues - eventing is challenging enough - so you want a horse without certain issues - I like to pick a horse old enough that I can tell doesnt have those.

And you want the horse to have a very safe athletic jump. I have looked at three horses where one was perfectly built - one was a pit straight in the shoulder and th eother was inbetween. The horse straight in the shoulder still had great range of motion and actually picks his legs up tight in front where as the one inbetween HANGS and I was like NO. I can fix some things but I would rather spend my money on a horse that has an up and safe front end.

On that note, a POWERFUL hind is also super helpful.

If you find a nice brave TB with a powerful hind and the neck not set too low, those usually make great eventers.

A lot of appendix QHs or appendix-y paints make niceones too. I know a LOT of nice APPY eventers. My eventer is an appy WB cross. He has a total of ONE spots - on his neck. A rider in my barn has a reg appy mare eventer - all she has is light snowflakes on her sides and looks otherwise like a bright bay. In case you dont like spots.

The Appy mind seems to be a determined fellow and smart. The Appy mare's dad was actually an Appendix.

I have trained 3 Friesians and though I like them - I dont think they make fab jumpers. If you are looking at heavies - Percheron crosses seem to be the nicest eventers.

BUT when looking for an eventer - dont get stuck on a breed - go look at the HEART and the natural jumping ability and a good mind. You want a horse that wants to gobble up a field and brave big fences but still keep his cool about it.

And at low levels - dressage scores are so key so a little wow movement is nice! This paint in my barn the girl has who borrows my pony to go crosscountry - her paint is 16 hands and is nothing minutely western - he is ALL sporthorse type paint. A top level dressage trainer who I work with worked with him for a little bit because of his issues - and said - we need to work him through the issues because he is a WOW mover.

So again, look at paints, QHs, Arab crosses - to get some size I would cross them, TBs of course, some WBs though people tend to ask more because they are WB so sometimes you may get as good a horse for less with another breed.... Appys.... oh and Appys are easy keepers and have thick big bones that appear to stay sound through anything.

wildlifer
Jan. 1, 2012, 08:39 PM
I don't buy breeds -- I buy the horse in front of me. I make a list of performance criteria I need and I buy conformation that is built to last, a great brain, and the physical ability to perform at the levels I want. I don't care what the breed is or is not if it meets all my criteria.

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 1, 2012, 08:44 PM
I don't buy breeds -- I buy the horse in front of me. I make a list of performance criteria I need and I buy conformation that is built to last, a great brain, and the physical ability to perform at the levels I want. I don't care what the breed is or is not if it meets all my criteria.

I agree whole-heatedly. I'm definitely not a breed snob. I was just asking people's opinion of what I should be looking at as far as good for the job, not necessarily because I only want to find a specific breed; just curious on what people lean towards and stay away from, in general breeds. :)

deltawave
Jan. 1, 2012, 10:06 PM
Just me, but if I want to buy an eventer, I start shopping at eventing barns. I would not choose a Friesian x anything as an event prospect, personally, unless my ambitions went no higher than Novice. They are just not eventers, sorry. Although exceptions are probably out there, I personally want to stack the odds in my favor and not have to get lucky with one who breaks the mold.

Give me an athletic, well-conformed horse who already has demonstrated that it LOVES CROSS COUNTRY. Everything else, EVERYTHING, is on a lower tier of importance, IMO. :)

I went shopping this summer, looked at a lot of horses, and wound up with one that meets the criteria above. Found him in about a week. :)

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 1, 2012, 10:17 PM
I went shopping this summer, looked at a lot of horses, and wound up with one that meets the criteria above. Found him in about a week.

Haha, maybe I should hire you to find mine. ;) I'm having terrible luck. But I did decide a firm "no" on the Friesian X. And I also am not too favorable on buying anything less then 4 years and absolutely nothing over 7. I'm leaning towards a Warmblood or a BIG TB.

Hey Mickey
Jan. 1, 2012, 11:21 PM
There are several horses listed on here that could work for you,
There are a couple that are a little older then what your looking for...but look nice and appear know their job

http://eventingnation.com/sporthorsenation/area/area-viii/

deltawave
Jan. 1, 2012, 11:52 PM
The best horse I ever rode XC was sixteen when I bought her. Never underestimate the value of a schoolmaster if you're just starting out. Ought to be mandatory IMO. ;)

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 2, 2012, 12:03 AM
The best horse I ever rode XC was sixteen when I bought her. Never underestimate the value of a schoolmaster if you're just starting out. Ought to be mandatory IMO.

Murphy, my OTTB gelding, IS my school master. ;) He's turning 16 this May.

I keep getting the inexperienced card, which I understand since I haven't competed at an actual event; however I HAVE (extensively) competed in Dressage, Jumping, Hunters, etc. And I have also schooled Cross Country for the last 3 years. If that helps any. :) And I've been riding since I was 3, but actually training/competing since I was 9. Hopefully that clears some things up.

Oh, and also, I have a type of "scholarship", it's a cross between a grant and scholarship, I guess, that is sponsoring my for all I need but only if the horse is "younger." It pays for ALL training/coaching, events, and tack. :)

Kairoshorses
Jan. 2, 2012, 01:17 AM
I spent a YEAR trying to find a horse, and finally found my perfect match.

My criteria were:

--over 16 hh

--competed through training

That's it. I tried a bunch out, liked some, but they didn't vet. Others simply didn't feel right or work right for ME.

I finally found the best horse in the world, who happens to be an Irish Sport Horse.

Good luck!!

jn4jenny
Jan. 2, 2012, 05:16 AM
Haha, maybe I should hire you to find mine. ;) I'm having terrible luck. But I did decide a firm "no" on the Friesian X. And I also am not too favorable on buying anything less then 4 years and absolutely nothing over 7. I'm leaning towards a Warmblood or a BIG TB.

In this economy with $10,000 in your pocket, it shouldn't be that hard to find what you want. I'm not saying you'll buy the first horse you inquire about, but $10K is a lot of cash in this economy and it's the dead of winter when lots of folks would rather take a good sales offer than pay to keep wintering the horse. IMHO as someone who lived in Michigan for five years and bought my eventer there, it's tough but not impossible to shop for an eventer that's run a few BN or Ns (and has therefore proven it can do the basic job but it's unclear what its Training/Prelim potential will be) at $5000. It's pretty darn easy to shop for "going Novice and showing plenty enough potential for Prelim " with $10000. Admittedly, if you wanted "has shown a whole solid season of Novice and is practically screaming 'I will eat Prelim for breakfast' and is a fancy mover with a tidy jump," that's gonna be $15,000 and up. But the point is that on $10,000, picking up a youngish horse that's got SOME eventing mileage should be no big deal.

If it were my problem and I still live in Michigan, I believe I'd call my nearest reputable event trainer and ask them what they had. Robin Walker, Phillippa Humphreys, Jill Mooney, Holly Johnson, that sort of person. Heck, Phillippa's got a suitable one listed right now:
http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1743321

It's not only evented successfully at Novice and ready to move up to training, but it's safe in traffic and it foxhunts first flight!? AND it's being sold by a reputable eventing trainer? And it's 3/4 TB so one can reasonably expect it to have the stamina necessary for Prelim? That's a lot of horse for your $10,000. Phillippa also has a nice mare on her web site priced at $7500 (pheventing.com).

Or if you like 'em a little greener, there's this one:
http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1738753

Or if you like them even younger and less started than that, get thee to thy nearest OTTB restarter. Derby Lyn Farms in east Michigan often has some nice prospects:
http://derbylynfarms.sports.officelive.com/Sales.aspx

deltawave
Jan. 2, 2012, 12:43 PM
I keep getting the inexperienced card, which I understand since I haven't competed at an actual event; however I HAVE (extensively) competed in Dressage, Jumping, Hunters, etc. And I have also schooled Cross Country for the last 3 years. If that helps any. And I've been riding since I was 3, but actually training/competing since I was 9. Hopefully that clears some things up.Yes, I am still dealing you the inexperienced card. There is no shame or negativity in it whatsoever. I rode for TWENTY YEARS before I entered my first event, including riding to hounds, and was as green a newbie as I could possibly have been. Mounted on a totally inappropriate horse, I might add, and it is only through blind luck and decent stickability that I was able to press on until my schoolmistress found her way into my life, at which point I began to REALLY PROGRESS in the sport. Check out Team CEO. They always have a dozen or so good horses for sale with amateur-friendly backgrounds, beaucoux EVENTING miles and reasonable prices. That's where I found mine. :)

deltawave
Jan. 2, 2012, 01:07 PM
PS, "schoolmaster" implies a horse that has more experience than the rider in whatever discipline, and has the requisite sense of humor to tolerate the inevitable blunders. My schoolmistress had gone Prelim/CCI* for years and years with other amateurs, while I was still a Training wannabe plonking around at Novice. Not all mature, well-schooled horses are schoolmasters.

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 2, 2012, 03:19 PM
In this economy with $10,000 in your pocket, it shouldn't be that hard to find what you want. I'm not saying you'll buy the first horse you inquire about, but $10K is a lot of cash in this economy and it's the dead of winter when lots of folks would rather take a good sales offer than pay to keep wintering the horse. IMHO as someone who lived in Michigan for five years and bought my eventer there, it's tough but not impossible to shop for an eventer that's run a few BN or Ns (and has therefore proven it can do the basic job but it's unclear what its Training/Prelim potential will be) at $5000. It's pretty darn easy to shop for "going Novice and showing plenty enough potential for Prelim " with $10000. Admittedly, if you wanted "has shown a whole solid season of Novice and is practically screaming 'I will eat Prelim for breakfast' and is a fancy mover with a tidy jump," that's gonna be $15,000 and up. But the point is that on $10,000, picking up a youngish horse that's got SOME eventing mileage should be no big deal.

If it were my problem and I still live in Michigan, I believe I'd call my nearest reputable event trainer and ask them what they had. Robin Walker, Phillippa Humphreys, Jill Mooney, Holly Johnson, that sort of person. Heck, Phillippa's got a suitable one listed right now:
http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse...rse_id=1743321

It's not only evented successfully at Novice and ready to move up to training, but it's safe in traffic and it foxhunts first flight!? AND it's being sold by a reputable eventing trainer? And it's 3/4 TB so one can reasonably expect it to have the stamina necessary for Prelim? That's a lot of horse for your $10,000. Phillippa also has a nice mare on her web site priced at $7500 (pheventing.com).

Or if you like 'em a little greener, there's this one:
http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse...rse_id=1738753

Or if you like them even younger and less started than that, get thee to thy nearest OTTB restarter. Derby Lyn Farms in east Michigan often has some nice prospects:
http://derbylynfarms.sports.officelive.com/Sales.aspx

Poker Face - yes, I have inquired about him. :) He's lovely. But yes, Michigan is a little difficult, but definitely not impossible. :)

I'll look at your other links in a minute.


Yes, I am still dealing you the inexperienced card. There is no shame or negativity in it whatsoever. I rode for TWENTY YEARS before I entered my first event, including riding to hounds, and was as green a newbie as I could possibly have been. Mounted on a totally inappropriate horse, I might add, and it is only through blind luck and decent stickability that I was able to press on until my schoolmistress found her way into my life, at which point I began to REALLY PROGRESS in the sport. Check out Team CEO. They always have a dozen or so good horses for sale with amateur-friendly backgrounds, beaucoux EVENTING miles and reasonable prices. That's where I found mine.

As I said, I am fine with that title because, well, I AM. But not to riding. I by NO means think I'm going to jump on a green horse and BAM be able to go to Prelim. ;) Even I am not that crazy. ;) Haha

I'll look them up, thanks! :)


PS, "schoolmaster" implies a horse that has more experience than the rider in whatever discipline, and has the requisite sense of humor to tolerate the inevitable blunders. My schoolmistress had gone Prelim/CCI* for years and years with other amateurs, while I was still a Training wannabe plonking around at Novice. Not all mature, well-schooled horses are schoolmasters.

Absolutely, this is something I know well. :)
I bought my OTTB last year AS a schoolmaster.
He thinks I'm a quack when I'm jumping, what are in his mind, as "baby jumps." *rolls eyes*
He was eventing Prelim. when I bought him, he's very good at his job. Wise, brave, honest, careful and scopey. I love my boy. <3

deltawave
Jan. 2, 2012, 03:45 PM
What part of Michigan?

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 4, 2012, 09:51 PM
What part of Michigan?

Lansing area.

So, What does everyone think of this guy?

http://www.canterusa.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5231:king-of-lords&catid=46:mi-canter-listings

The picture is pretty crumby =\ Anything you can tell me?

Thanks!

ccr0009
Jan. 4, 2012, 10:03 PM
I voted irish draughts, but in my opinion love an ID/TB cross, irish sport horse. Where wb's are 'often' heavy for xcountry. The cross can produce a substantial horse w/ a great mind. (And just look at the upper level horses now). At the same time you see a lot of OTTB's, which can be found cheaper but may require more work to bring along.
I hope I won't be to criticized for this comment, but from experience, the modern OTTB 'often' won't last or suffers from bad feet or is a hard keeper. (When looking for a TB eventer I'd look for an older style w/ substantial bone)

slp2
Jan. 4, 2012, 10:10 PM
Chealsea Jo--I am in the Lansing area (DeWitt). There is a horse for sale at the barn where I board that meets your criteria. He is not owned by me--but being sold by the dressage trainer at the barn. 16.2 h, Holsteiner/Tb. He evented novice level last year--he's 7 years old.

Here's a link to his ad:
http://www.warmbloods-for-sale.com/SearchResult5.asp?Name=Rum+Raisin

Debbie
Jan. 4, 2012, 10:34 PM
I like the look of the Canter horse, but it isn't a great angle. Here's his pedigree if anyone has any thoughts on it: http://www.pedigreequery.com/king+of+lords

With that many starts, if he vets clean you need not worry about breaking him. I just resold one with that many starts that I did not vet when I bought him. His new owner did and he was really clean.

judybigredpony
Jan. 5, 2012, 07:14 AM
Must be a VERY tall man holding a 16.3 horse :)

Heinz 57
Jan. 5, 2012, 01:12 PM
Must be a VERY tall man holding a 16.3 horse :)

:confused: 16.3 = 5'7"
Man appears to be a couple inches taller than the horse's withers, which would make him around 5'10"-6'. I wouldn't consider that particularly tall. He's cute, seems fairly level and I like his neck. His head looks a bit blocky, but I've got one that looks like Eeyore and that doesn't seem to affect his jumping ability either. :winkgrin:

If you can track one down, Pleasant Colony babies/lines generally tend to have really NICE movement and good size/bone, plus a pretty laid back attitude. (JMO)

ChelsaeJo
Jan. 6, 2012, 11:06 PM
I found another photo! :)

http://www.freep.com/article/20111226/NEWS03/112260338/Finding-a-good-home-for-horses-is-key-to-taking-reins-after-rehab