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View Full Version : Owning a trailer vs. Paying trainer to trailer



Addictedeventer
Dec. 28, 2011, 02:57 PM
Ok so these trailering fees are getting ridiculous. It's $1.25 a mile and when your traveling to events through out Area II, the trailering fees are astronomical compared to what it would be if I owned a trailer. So I was wondering what the perks of owning a trailer are versus paying a trainer to trailer. I would be pulling the trailer with an Envoy SUV 4WD. Let me know opinions! Thanks!

AEM74
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:14 PM
I would venture to guess that whatever you're paying your trainer to haul for you is less expensive than it would be to own and maintain your own rig. You have to factor in the expense of the trailer, insurance, registration, repairs, maintenance, etc. Since you'd be pulling with an SUV, I'd guess your trailer would be on the smaller side, but you still need to consider the various and sundry costs associated with having your own wheels. For example, where will you store the trailer and will you be charged to store it at said location?

That said, and coming from someone who was dependent on others for transportation for many years, having your own rig is a wonderful thing. You can go where you want when you want and you don't need to factor anyone else's schedule, fees, etc. into the equation. For me, that freedom is worth the extra expense.

trubandloki
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:22 PM
You can go a lot of miles at $1.25 before you reach what a truck payment will be. That does not include insurance and upkeep on the vehicle and certainly does not include the cost of the trailer.

Do not go into trailer/truck ownership thinking it will save you a boat load of money. You will be sadly mistaken.

Mtn trails
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:36 PM
What TruBlu said. It's mostly a convenience factor.

Addictedeventer
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:38 PM
You can go a lot of miles at $1.25 before you reach what a truck payment will be. That does not include insurance and upkeep on the vehicle and certainly does not include the cost of the trailer.

Do not go into trailer/truck ownership thinking it will save you a boat load of money. You will be sadly mistaken.

I already have a vehicle to pull it and if I found a used 2 horse do you still think it will be much more? I will need a trailer before I go off to college anyway do wouldnt it be beneficial to get it now and save some money possibly.

ChocoMare
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:38 PM
You can go a lot of miles at $1.25 before you reach what a truck payment will be. That does not include insurance and upkeep on the vehicle and certainly does not include the cost of the trailer.

Do not go into trailer/truck ownership thinking it will save you a boat load of money. You will be sadly mistaken.

^ This :yes:

Not to mention, towing anything besides a Brenderup with an SUV is a very bad idea... just do a search thru COTH-dom on the subject. ;)

DiablosHalo
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:41 PM
Even if you get a used aluminum 2H BP for $5k - that is 4,000 miles worth of hauling by your trainer. Add in maintenance, insurance, etc - bump it to 5k worth of hauling miles.

How many events/miles do you travel in a year? Figure out if it's worth it to you. $1.25 loaded is half the price of commercial travel.

I don't haul commercially anymore but ordered a brand new 2+1 to sit in the driveway in case I want to go somewhere or need it for an emergency. I've put maybe 100 miles on it in 2 years - but wanted it. It's all in what it's worth to you.

azeventer
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:43 PM
^ This :yes:

Not to mention, towing anything besides a Brenderup with an SUV is a very bad idea... just do a search thru COTH-dom on the subject. ;)

I was just going to chime in that the only trailer you could safely pull with an Envoy SUV would be a Brenderup. (someone beat me too it, though. :) ) Brenderups are not cheap, if I remember correctly. Towing any other type of trailer with an SUV.....not safe. As above...do a search on the subject, you'll see.

Addictedeventer
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:48 PM
Thanks for your help everyone ! I'll look further into everything before I make any decisions.

Far_North_Equestrian
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:51 PM
I was just going to chime in that the only trailer you could safely pull with an Envoy SUV would be a Brenderup. (someone beat me too it, though. :) ) Brenderups are not cheap, if I remember correctly. Towing any other type of trailer with an SUV.....not safe. As above...do a search on the subject, you'll see.

This. And, Brenderups are very seldom imported into North America anymore. There is another lightweight brand that we get here in Canada called Bockmann that are supposed to be very good though, I'm considering one myself.

They are super hard to find used, although new seem to run similar in price to comprable aluminum trailers (Hawk, etc). They start at around $13k for the base model, I'd say you'd be at 15k by the time you get all the add ons you'd need.

Beam Me Up
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:52 PM
The perk is really convenience--being able to travel on your own schedule. Also independence, if you ever want to go somewhere or do something without your trainer.

It is probably not cheaper. Towing a non-Brenderup with an Envoy is not the best idea, but it is probably $0.40/mile in gas alone, plus you have to buy/maintain/store the trailer, your SUV is going to probably need modifications and increased maintenance too.

If you have to have a trailer in the future anyway, then maybe it makes sense to take the plunge sooner rather than later but do go to off-course and around the farm forums for and search the tow vehicle discussions.

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 28, 2011, 03:52 PM
I have NO idea how people can survive without their own rigs.

When I was younger and more broke...my only vechile was my towing vehicle. I had a 3/4 ton truck...and honestly, I still drive my truck more than my car. So that cut down on costs significantly (rather than having multiple cars). A nice two horse trailer isn't too expensive...especially if you buy used. Insurance is also not much.

The benefits...endless. I can trailer out to clinics, lessons with different trainers...trail rides with my friends. I can get to a show when *I* need to be there and leave whenever *I* feel like it.

If my horse is sick or injured...figuring out how to get him to the best vet or hospital isn't a stress.

I can do whatever I want to do.

In the end...having your own trailer is having more freedom. Kind of like when you get your first car.

And once you have had your own trailer....it is very very very hard to do without.

ETA: I have towed with a smaller SUV and much prefer towing with a truck. The smaller SUVs may have the pulling power but not always the weight and stability I want for stopping. That said...I typically am pulling two large horses with a lot of equipment. Another alternative is getting a small horse van. Horses haul great in them and used ones are not super pricey.

poltroon
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:03 PM
If you have a trainer who can/will haul for you whenever you go to shows, at times convenient for you, then you are ahead financially, even at $1.25 a mile.

The expense of owning the trailer isn't just buying the trailer. The gas costs money. The tires cost money. When I boarded, we had a monthly storage fee. When it's your trailer, it's you who buys shavings, puts them in, takes them out, cleans the trailer, hoses out the poop, etc.

With an undersized tow vehicle, you also have to ask yourself how much your transmission and brakes are worth to you. If your trainer has a large rig, it's probably a nicer ride for the horses than your rig will be.

I bought my first trailer because I didn't have that - the trainer didn't have a trailer available. So we always had to deal with outside haulers, which was a scheduling nightmare and took a lot of legwork. It made just going to a nearby clinic or dressage show unworkable.

On the nice side, my trailer is always loaded with my traveling gear, which makes going someplace fast and easy. I can travel quick and easy to a dressage show, with my travel tailored to my ride time, and not have to stay all day. I can go on short notice, and my trailer is large and airy and comfortable for me and for the horse. I can work out of my tack room and not pay for a tack stall, and I can do haul ins at dressage shows and avoid stabling.

I loved (and still love) having a trailer. But it didn't save money. Even 13 years later, I'd be ahead financially paying by the mile.

Lori B
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:05 PM
I have done the math over and over and over, and it just doesn't save you money to own a truck and trailer. And yes, it has to be a truck.

It makes my brain explode to contemplate commuting with a crappy 15-20 MPG truck. I drive a minimum of 40 miles a day, and my current commuting car gets 30+ mpg.

Truck -- absolute minimum cost is about $10k.
trailer: absolute minimum about $5k.
Insurance and gas for both.

I can pay my trainer to haul me and buy her a nice lunch every time and still spend thousands less than owning a truck and trailer.

If you want to compete and go to clinics, etc. a lot, it is definitely more convenient to have own hauling gear, but it will never in a million years be cheaper.

Edited to note that this does depend on having a willing and available trainer w/ trailer. But for a trainer, it's a business expense, or at least it seems like it should be.

Janet
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:05 PM
I do not know about Envoys specifically. But if you tow with at vehicle that was not built with a heavy duty transmission, you will probably be replacing said transmission on a regular basis.

I keep my horses at home, and have my own trailer, which I tow with a Ford Econoline.

I doubt you will save much money in the long run by having your own trailer. It is more a question of convenience- the ability to go other places and arrive/leave at different times.

But if you still need to coordinate arrivals and departures with the trainer's schedule, it might not add that much convenience.

Currently, do you load/unload all your equipment, or does that trainer do that?

Finally, what does your trainer think? Is it "one less horse to worry about"? or is it "one extra complication to have to coordinate"?

smokygirl
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:23 PM
Ok so these trailering fees are getting ridiculous. It's $1.25 a mile and when your traveling to events through out Area II, the trailering fees are astronomical compared to what it would be if I owned a trailer. So I was wondering what the perks of owning a trailer are versus paying a trainer to trailer. I would be pulling the trailer with an Envoy SUV 4WD. Let me know opinions! Thanks!

You probably won't be pulling a trailer very long with an Envoy. They just aren't really built for it.

quietann
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:25 PM
As others have said, you'd get a lot of trailering miles before you reached the basic costs of having a rig. And yes... with an SUV, you'd not be looking at towing a "regular" trailer

Used trailers are like used anything else, which is to say dicey. Paid $3500 for what I thought was a reasonable 2H BP, and it was a nightmare -- major electrical issues (blew the alternator on the truck twice before we figured it out), other safety issues and my horse was scared of it (given the safety issues, I don't blame her, and I always say she's smarter than I am. :lol:) The person I bought it from, I later found out, buys up the used trailers that won't pass the vetting at a trailer dealer's lot, and waits for chumps like me to show up.

We got $750 for it on a trade-in, bought a new trailer and upgraded the truck (original truck *could* do the hauling but did not have 4WD and we're happier with just a bit more power.) All that cost about $18K. That was in 2009, and then horse went lame and we used the trailer exactly twice in 2010, to take her to her surgery and back, and about 6 times in 2011.

But -- if you like to go places without your trainer -- if you trailer to trailheads, go to a lot of clinics away from the barn, go out on rides at other barns etc. -- the convenience of having your own rig is wonderful.

airhorse
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:30 PM
Does your trainer have a CDL and commercial insurance?

Better find out, lots of states cracking down hard on this issue. Be a real bitch to find someone to come get your horse if the trainers rig gets impounded.

tle
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:33 PM
Truck -- absolute minimum cost is about $10k.
trailer: absolute minimum about $5k.

I'm not arguing that it isn't financially a better idea to own your own. As you put it, the numbers just aren't there. However, I am wondering where you're coming up with your "minimums"? They seem REALLY on the high side, especially your "minimum" for the trailer (and espeically in this economy). my first trailer made the trip to Canada and back with my girl, and that was after 5 years of eventing around Area VIII... and it was a $1500 2 horse walk thru that I know for a FACT I purchased within 48 hours of the dealer taking it in on trade (and in that 48 hours he made $700).

Still... even with minimums closer to what I think they should be... you're still paying for convenience by owning your own.

jn4jenny
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:42 PM
You'll not find $1.25/mile so expensive when you really run the numbers. Heck, I know many trainers who charge $2/mile.

But for sake of argument, let's talk about pulling a Brenderup with an Envoy. There is a COTHer who does exactly that--I know so because I sold her her first Brenderup and she's recently upgraded to another newer, bigger Brenderup. The Envoy is well within the specs for the Brenderups and AFAIK her vehicle is fine and well.

Now let's talk math.

I own a Brenderup Solo one-horse trailer that I pull with my daily driver vehicle. So like you, I do not include the cost of my daily driver in the equation. It's among the cheapest rigs I could possibly have assembled, and I suspect I'm getting a better financial deal than most trailer owners--but even so, here's the ugly math:

$4000 for the trailer, and B'up prices are way up since they were discontinued in the US so you'd likely pay more like $6000-$9000. And since B'ups are few and far between, you'll likely have to pay gas and/or transport costs to haul it in from many miles away. I bought my first B'up from Florida, the second from Tennessee.

Approx. $100 for the trailer hitch and to run wires for the lights

Approx. $200 for a transmission cooler and other adjustments to my daily driver vehicle that make it more suitable for towing

To pay for the $4300 sunk cost, I'd have to log 3500+ miles of trailering during which I would burn approximately $800 worth of gas. So once you account for the gas cost and compare it to paying $1.25/mile, I don't break even until I've logged over 4,000 miles.

And that's not including the rotating costs:

Approx. $80 yearly in trailer insurance (more if your trailer was more expensive than mine)

Approx $30 yearly in trailer tags (check your state laws--in Michigan I only had to pay the trailer tags once, not every year)

Approx. $75-100 yearly for upkeep/maintenance, which is mostly a distributed cost for new tires every 3-4 years and annual checkups for integrity and brake alignment (the wheel bearings are sealed, at least)

I don't pay for trailer parking at my barn, but if you do, that can easily add another $300-$500 per year.

The cost of good synthetic oil that's more suitable for trailering. I change my own oil in the driveway, so this is pretty negligible compared to the cost of regular oil (maybe $30-$40 more per year). If you use Jiffy Lube or the dealer for oil changes, the extra cost can be much higher.

And of course, there's the cost of gas. Even in my daily driver vehicle, I get about 15 mpg towing and it's best to tow on premium fuel in an SUV. So that's about $3.65 per gallon, which comes out to about 24 cents per mile.

Your turn to do the math. If you log enough mileage and distribute the costs over enough years, it might come out in your favor. For example, I know someone whose Brenderup paid for itself in one East-Coast-to-West-Coast trip.

Now I'll be fair and state some advantages that induce me to buy and keep a trailer that I drive MAYBE eight times a year (making it a money-losing proposition, so these advantages obviously mean a great deal to me):

1. I'm on my own schedule. I can show up later and leave earlier than my trainer, and I often do. If my barnmates are stuck at a two or three day dressage or jumping show, I can trailer in for one day and go home at night.

2. Freedom. If I want to go to a show or clinic that none of my barnmates or trainer want to go to, I just go. I have not yet had to trailer a horse in an emergency, but it's a comfort to know that my trailer is there.

3. I have a one-horse trailer so I don't trailer-pool, but lots of eventers find a trailering partner to pay their gas money.

meupatdoes
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:47 PM
My truck and trailer have already paid for themselves.

a.) I bought them used so my total payment for the whole rig together was just under $6k. I had it in cash so no truck payments for me.

b.) i have already hauled two horses from NJ to TX and then back to NY. There alone it paid for itself.

c.) because I can trailer to lessons, I can board at much less expensive barns with no trainer attached and trailer out. This gives me lower board payments, and much more control of horse sales, what horse shows and clinics I attend, etc etc.
No trainer "owns" me, I pull in the driveway, pay for my lesson, and then leave.

Currently my board is $325 per month per horse, with two of the trainers I lesson with it would be $600 a month or $1,000 a month, just to pay the board before lessons.
Therefore having the trailer pays for itself every month because I can spend the extra money on lessons, not extra board to ride with the people I want to ride with.

d.) I am also frequently able to save farm call fees because the horses' vet is 15 minutes away. Several times I have trailered the 15 minutes TO the vet and spent maybe $15 on gas rather than $50 on a farm call.
Also it is easier to schedule the farrier when you can meet him somewhere, rather than waiting for his schedule to free up enough to come to a particular barn.

e.) I have also been able to trailer a horse to the clinic when he needed it rather than wasting time calling around for a ride. One of my current horse's life was saved when my friend (who owned him then) saw him colicking and did not pass go, did not collect $200, she put him IMMEDIATELY on her trailer when she saw him and went STRAIGHT to the clinic. He only lived because she happened to live 15 minutes away from Cornell. If she hadn't owned her own trailer they would have been too late. It still brings tears to my eyes to think of her driving through the snow to get this horse help in time.

f.) Also, if the fit ever really hits the shan in a boarding situation, it is great to be able to load up and GO. All the contingency plans in the world do you no good if you can't get the horse to them.

So, long story short, I would not give up my truck and trailer for all the tea in china. There have been weeks where I hauled the same horse 5 times in one week. A lesson here, to the clinic for teeth done there, meet the farrier, go to a clinic. They pay for themselves every month just in the board I save to be able to lesson with great trainers without having to pay their board rates!

tabula rashah
Dec. 28, 2011, 04:49 PM
I personally can't imagine not having my own rig. First off, I feel it would be completely irresponsible of me since my horses are at home to not have a trailer in case of an emergency. Secondly I am super anal about who trailers my horses and most of the people I've ridden with driving a trailer do NOT cut the mustard when it comes to driving. Thirdly I haul out almost every time I ride, sometimes several times a week- no way I'd be able to do that having to hire someone every time.
I did go through the numbers and yes, for me, it is cheaper to have the rig than to pay someone else to haul for me, but then again I need the truck anyway for the farm whether or not I have a horse trailer.

sid
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:11 PM
The ONE thing you can't put a monetary cost comparison on is knowing you have your own rig to get your horse to a surgical facility in an emergency -- and not have to "wait" to find someone who can take you/your horse.

In some cases, a mere 1/2 hour can mean the difference between survival or demise for your equine pal.

Ask me know I know...;). Peace of mind AND you can haul to shows and do what you want, when you want, without being dependent upon others.

JMHO and experience. You'll never regret having your own transportation, believe me.

Lori B
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:12 PM
tle, even if my minimums are high, I don't know anything about trucks, and I respect that there is stuff to know. If you know more, you can probably spend less. I would be afraid of buying myself a truck that's a moneypit in need of expensive repairs.

I live in the suburbs, don't have a garage and would be parking a truck in my driveway along w/ 3 other vehicles. I would be paying my barn rent to park a trailer.

And in these threads, someone always pipes up about making sure my trainer who hauls for me has a CDL license, etc. Since we never haul that far or that often, I am going to respectfully take my chances and not worry about that. I know the lawsuit phobic set on this board is horrified, but I'll take my chances.

And the approach that meupatdoes takes of hauling horse to vet, farrier, etc. herself, to make the rig save her money is only practical if you don't have a 9-5 desk job. Which I do.

scubed
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:34 PM
I have considered this often and stuck with not having my own rig. Because of work/ travel, my horse is at a full care barn so between trainer, staff and other boarders, I have never really had an issue.

gottagrey
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:47 PM
I would think it would depend on how many competitions you plan to go to in order to justify the expense of trailering, however, the flexibility of having your own rig could override that that. You could trailer to lessons, clinics, trail ride w/ friends etc. Since you have an SUV - hopefully it has a towing package and I would have a good trailer person check out your vehicle to make sure. If I were in your shoes, I would look for a nice used 2 horse stock trailer w/ tack room and they're not terribly expensive in the grand scheme of things.

HoofaSchmigetty
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:54 PM
Forget the cost difference.....Everyone is forgetting the following. Whatever time you NOW leave to get to a horse show...figure on leaving your house about 2-3 hours EARLIER.....You need to "hook up", load your horse and DRIVE however far to the show you are attending. However long it NOW takes you to get to the show by CAR...add about 30% additional time just for the drive. Funny thing is.....Some call it a CONVENIENCE to own your own trailer...LOL

sunnycher
Dec. 28, 2011, 05:55 PM
Also, I think it would depend on whether or not you board your horse vs keep at home. If you have the expense of board, then it would be definitely less expensive to have trainer haul you, BUT, if you keep horses at home and don't have that monthly charge - then it could be worth it.

I cannot imagine not have my own rig, but that also comes sometimes with age, i.e., no more kiddies at home, etc. It is awesome to have truck hooked up all the time, and have another car to tool around town, the best of all...

Good luck with your decision.

Fancy That
Dec. 28, 2011, 06:00 PM
You can't beat the flexibility, convenience and freedom of having your own rig.

That said, it's definitely not cheap. Alot of folks have detailed that.

It really depends on your situation. If you are at a "show barn" with lots of barn buddies and in training- you are probably fine just sticking w/ your trainer taking you to events.

As for me, I'm more independent and even when I boarded, I loved having a rig to go and do whatever I wanted. That includes trailering out for lessons, clinics, shows, trails, camping, schooling XC, foxhunting..you name it.

We bought a ranch 2 years ago so it really is MANDATORY to have a rig, IMHO, when you have horses at home. You need to be able to EVACUATE them in an emergency. I also can take them to the vet which is less than 10 minutes away, etc.

Simply going to be a decision only you can make.

And BTW, you REALLY can't haul anything except a Brenderup with a SUV.

sid
Dec. 28, 2011, 06:45 PM
I have a 9-5 career self employed in the BIG ad agency world...as well as 60 acre farm with many horses (down to 12 from 23 as they've aged and left life). I live an 18 hr. day and have for 25 years.

That said, it is actually because of this work load I personally find it a great relief (and have found it to be so in a practical matter many times over) to have my own rig hooked upped and ready emergency -- so if I have to get any horse that needed it to a surgical facility on a dime in a red hot emergency. Having it ready for shows was just gravy.

Just sayin'...sometimes it comes down to peace of mind. Not just money.

asterix
Dec. 28, 2011, 07:08 PM
To the OP -- as everyone has said, probably not cheaper on the numbers but convenience, ease of going wherever, and emergency care options = very very nice to have.

But.

The Envoy is going to really limit what you can safely tow. I recommend finding out what its towing specs are -- both GVWR and the tow rating -- and then figuring out what options that leaves you in terms of a trailer.
THEN you can see whether there are trailers to be found that are in your budget that the Envoy can tow.

I am pretty dubious about the options, but it is really about the numbers.

airhorse
Dec. 28, 2011, 07:23 PM
And in these threads, someone always pipes up about making sure my trainer who hauls for me has a CDL license, etc. Since we never haul that far or that often, I am going to respectfully take my chances and not worry about that. I know the lawsuit phobic set on this board is horrified, but I'll take my chances.



Has absolutely zero to do with lawsuits, just hefty fines and having to have someone come get your horse if your trainer is ever stopped.

fitzwilliam
Dec. 28, 2011, 07:42 PM
I own a truck and trailer which both reside at the barn where my horses live. Since I do not use my rig a lot I share it and the expenses with 2 other boarders. Of course, you need to enter this type of agreement with very responsible adults who understand the ramifications of upkeep, liability, maintenance, etc. Luckily for me my friends are like that so it's nice to divide the tire bill by 3, etc. They also pay me mileage to account for wear and tear. This situation would not work well for everyone but it's nice (and green) when it does. Just a thought for people who board at barns where there are many trailers.

smokygirl
Dec. 28, 2011, 08:35 PM
Oh I think it's a great idea to have your own truck and trailer (and no the Envoy doesn't count as a truck)..

But if the one reason you want one is to save the 1.25/mile charge bc you think it will cost less for you to haul.. HAHAHAHA. Yeah that would not be my motivator in getting one.

retreadeventer
Dec. 28, 2011, 08:38 PM
I think you have to sort of think of adding a truck/trailer into your lifestyle. Are you willing to do all the hauling, or would you rather that the stable do it?
Cost wise, I believe that the rate now is at least $1/mile, many up to $2/mile (loaded). Unloaded miles are sometimes charged, but if you are shipping from a stable to competition and back, unless you sell the horse at the show or event, you'll have only loaded charges to pay.

If you are boarding at a large barn and everyone goes, you're in the best of positions; a small barn, not everyone events, or there are a bunch of greenies while your horse is higher level -- well, you take your chances you may not get a convenient ship for him.

Also, if you ship with others, the schedule is dictated by the first ride of the day and the last ride. If your horse was in the middle, then he's gonna have a long day, and if you have a horse that doesn't like to stand, or is uncomfortable being tied to the trailer -- or perhaps got injured or pulled a shoe off -- he's gotta wait all day to get home. None of which is ideal.

If you ship quite a bit off the farm to compete I think on the whole you'd be money ahead not to have your own rig. The only scenario would be emergency, and most stable owners should be available for an emergency anyhow.

Those who share rigs, etc. need to look up your insurance policy -- please. Check to see who is insured when operating the truck WITH trailer attached. For instance, my auto policy insures anyone driving my rig as long as they have a policy with the same company...and some companies recognize "authorized" drivers designated by the policy holder no matter what/who insures the authorized driver. Remember it's not you you insure for, it's the other morons who run red lights, turn left on green into traffic, swing wide into your lane, rear-end you when they don't see traffic is stopped, etc. While we know it's just hauling a horse for a friend, the insurance industry does not see it that way. If you accept payment, even partial, to be covered you may find that the policy requires you must be insured as a commercial carrier and have a DOT number. This is not expensive, however, if you have a stable policy in place specifically naming shipping as one of the exposures. Be cautious with your insurance policy. I work in the insurance industry and things are getting tougher and tougher with regard to claims.

rhymeswithfizz
Dec. 28, 2011, 09:46 PM
It doesn't have to be expensive. My first trailer (which is now looking for a new home by the way if anyone is on the hunt) is a great sized 2H bumper pull, straight load, and only a few hundred pounds heavier than a brenderup at a fraction of the cost. Fugly as all get out, but big and safe and everything works. Extra insurance is not required in my state as it is covered by the towing vehicle... But had I wanted it for liability reasons, it was a whopping $16 a year.
Registration is around $25 a year.

Can't put a price on the freedom that I got when getting my own trailer. I love it!

CANTEREOIN
Dec. 29, 2011, 07:56 AM
BornFree... said it well!

There may be no discernable savings to have your own rig. If you're really in it for the long run, then it does make sense to have your own transportation.

I used to travel with a Trainer to shows but that limited me to what she wanted to do and when she wanted to go. It did not allow me options and alternatives.

Having my own allows me to Hunt, Hunter Pace, Clinic and Lesson off the farm. It's packed the way I want it to be packed. I can share rides with friends... bring my own groom/friends.

Showing is just a small part of what I use my rig for... There is so much I do because of it. I've even taken my horse on vacation with me.

So, forget costs... think about what you want to do with your horse and for how long.

morganpony86
Dec. 29, 2011, 08:22 AM
The ONE thing you can't put a monetary cost comparison on is knowing you have your own rig to get your horse to a surgical facility in an emergency -- and not have to "wait" to find someone who can take you/your horse.


I wholeheartedly agree. I left my 2 retired horses behind when I moved to another state with my youngster (and took my rig with me). One of my old guys had an emergency and ended up spending months in the hospital. Trying to figure out rigs to get him there, and home, and back again when it didn't work out at home, and home again, definitely sealed it for me that it's worth having my own rig.

And it's 10X easier for showing. My horse doesn't have to spend the entire week at the show because my trainer is. I can haul him up on Friday night, show on Saturday, and go home Saturday night. Or, even show just during the day and save on a stall altogether. It definitely breaks even for gas in terms of what I save in show fees & care at the show when I'm not there because I have to work Tues-Fri.

And I actually have a small "go cart", as my SO calls it, for a daily driver; I did the math and it's cheaper for me to have 2 vehicles than to drive my truck daily. My truck only pulls my trailer.

oldpony66
Dec. 29, 2011, 08:23 AM
Forget the cost difference.....Everyone is forgetting the following. Whatever time you NOW leave to get to a horse show...figure on leaving your house about 2-3 hours EARLIER.....You need to "hook up", load your horse and DRIVE however far to the show you are attending. However long it NOW takes you to get to the show by CAR...add about 30% additional time just for the drive. Funny thing is.....Some call it a CONVENIENCE to own your own trailer...LOL

:confused:

You don't load your own stuff if your trainer hauls?

It takes me about 5 minutes to "hook up". The trailer can be loaded the day before (I can hook up the day before too) and loading tack/equipment might take... 15 minutes? 30 tops. The horse should load instantly if you work with them, say 10 minutes if you include putting on a sheet and shipping boots. It doesn't take me any longer to drive the trailer than the truck by itself (being more careful stopping and making turns does not add 30% additional time) so I'm not sure how that adds 2-3 hours for a trip.

Lori B
Dec. 29, 2011, 08:27 AM
There has not been 10 minutes of time during my ownership of a horse where I could afford not to think about costs. And OP is (if I am reading correctly) a young person going to college, so will more than likely be budgeting like a fiend.

So the real question is, can you afford a truck and trailer ? (see numerous comments about the SUV not being the right vehicle for this job) And if you can afford it, is the freedom they afford you worth the costs involved, which have been roughed out in other posts as well?

I'm not opposed to owning a rig, I just can't justify the expense when I have less costly ways to be mobile and to be able to address emergency transport needs.

morganpony86
Dec. 29, 2011, 08:31 AM
Forget the cost difference.....Everyone is forgetting the following. Whatever time you NOW leave to get to a horse show...figure on leaving your house about 2-3 hours EARLIER.....You need to "hook up", load your horse and DRIVE however far to the show you are attending. However long it NOW takes you to get to the show by CAR...add about 30% additional time just for the drive. Funny thing is.....Some call it a CONVENIENCE to own your own trailer...LOL

Wow, not the case for me. It takes me maybe 5 minutes to load up and go. My fellow boarders actually whine all the time about how long it takes them to pack their trunks for my trainer to load onto the trailer. My horse show stuff lives on my trailer, so all I literally need to grab is his day-to-day stuff and the horse.

Literally the thing that takes me the longest is putting on shipping wraps.

It takes me maybe a minute to hook up my bumper pull by myself.

And I don't know how you drive, but it is possible to drive the speed limits with a rig.

Highflyer
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:04 AM
To give you basic numbers-- my truck and trailer (very used, no 4 wheel drive F150, basic steel 2H w/out dressing room, plus new wiring, brake controller, tax, title, tags, etc.) cost about 11k. Insurance is an extra $50/ month (just the required insurance, no comprehensive) on top of the $50 I pay for my crappy car that I use for daily driving. The car is a small elderly Chevy full of dents and had basically no trade in value so I kept it to save miles/ gas on the truck.

Gas in this area is currently about $3.15/ gallon and I get about 12 miles to the gallon. I can't safely drive more than 60 mph because my truck and trailer are so light that at faster speeds a passing semi will make things sway. So I lose time but save gas there I guess.

I did 10 one day events this year and hauled to 9 of them, plus to maybe 15 lessons and a jumper show and a few dressage shows. Probably used the trailer 25 times. It will need all new tires in the spring, of course.

So, not a terrible deal as long as I can get 2+ more years with this truck, but no bargains either.

gottagrey
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:45 AM
Forget the cost difference.....Everyone is forgetting the following. Whatever time you NOW leave to get to a horse show...figure on leaving your house about 2-3 hours EARLIER.....You need to "hook up", load your horse and DRIVE however far to the show you are attending. However long it NOW takes you to get to the show by CAR...add about 30% additional time just for the drive. Funny thing is.....Some call it a CONVENIENCE to own your own trailer...LOL

HUH? 2-3 hours to hook and drive ? are you sure? Most people I know takes them 10-15 minutes; some barns have grooms which produce blanketed & wrapped horses to be loaded - mine doesn't - takes me 10-15 minutes to wrap and put cooler on said horse. Trainer driving trailer w/ clients following them arrive at the er em same time. On the plus side of having one's own rig is that if they can come and go after they compete. When a trainer hauls you your horse is on the trailer with the first and last horses to compete.. .can mean a very long day unless you pay extra for Day care services so you can arrive 1 hour before your ride(s) and leave whenever...

which brings up another point - does the cost of trailering and "day care/groom services and convenience outweigh the expense of having your own rig. Since OP has a vehicle capable of towing they are in a pretty good position to purchase a trailer. The economics would be different if OP was needing a tow vehicle and trailer.. as mentioned previously if it were me - I'd find a nice used stock trailer w/ tack room.I particularly like stocks if trailering alone.

HoofaSchmigetty
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:53 AM
STOCK TRAILER.......Nuff said!!! Apparantly, things are done much differently in the "stock" trailer world.

Beam Me Up
Dec. 29, 2011, 10:16 AM
I think maybe the 2-3 hrs mentioned is that if you are part of a show barn where you can meet your trainer at the show (as in, pack stuff the night before, then trainer loads your horse at the barn in the a.m. while you drive directly from your house to the show). Since that saves you a trip to the barn completely.

I think everyone is right, though, that is more about convenience than money for most situations. I have mine at home, and couldn't live without a rig (lessons, shows, emergencies, also use it to pick up hay, etc.) However, if I were at a barn with lessons on-site, a trainer to take me to shows and felt covered by the trainer/barn manager in emergencies, it might not be worth the stress/hassle/money to maintain my own vehicles just to shorten some show days.

airhorse
Dec. 29, 2011, 10:17 AM
OMG, show up in a stock trailer. Seriously.

Funny, but sadly true...

WishIWereRiding
Dec. 29, 2011, 11:02 AM
I read through many responses but not all. I can't speak about what you have for towing.
I bought my first trailer in March because of the freedom it allows me. That has been priceless. I used it maybe once a week this year trailering out for lessons, trail rides, hunter paces, events, clinics, vet, etc. I have a trainer at my barn that I regularly lesson with, but I have a 2nd trainer that I would meet up with at different facilities for lessons. For my young, green horse, these experiences have been wonderful. I got to do so much more this season because I had my own trailer. Now, there are people at my barn that have their own trailers too, but they hardly use them. So you have to decide how much you will use it to see if it is worth it. If I hadn't bought my own trailer this past year, I wouldn't have been able to do 95% of the things I did. I love the freedom, and love not having to rely on anyone to trailer me. Plus it only takes me 5-10" to hitch up, and the majority of my stuff lives in my trailer. Anything additional that I have to bring with me only takes 10" to put in. I'm looking forward to this spring and summer when I can get out again!

smay
Dec. 29, 2011, 11:11 AM
For the OP it appears that she should probably forget about purchasing the mythical horse trailer to tow with her GMC Envoy... ( bad idea). A young kid going to college really has no business or funds to own their own rig although I'm sure plenty will pipe up to say they DID have that when they were in college! I'd say just stick with the program - show horse boarded at a fullservice barn with trainer and hauling available - is expensive but less so than owning your own equipment at this point in life! I'd have to think that hauling and showing as a group with a trainer doing all the "grown up" work, is a safer and less nerve wracking alternative for a college student. Plus it is a lot more fun, usually!

kkindley
Dec. 29, 2011, 11:13 AM
What's wrong with a stock trailer? My favorite trailer I had as a kid was a 16' stock trailer that my dad built 2 horse stalls in. I had tons of storage space in the front, and it made the best pony club tackroom ever!!

Now I have a 1976 2 horse BP Kingston with no dressing room. Got if for nothing since it was my fiancee's as a kid. Stripped it to the frame underneath, put on all new tires, wheels, brakes, springs, wiring, LED lights, floor, and have metal to reskin the sides all for around 1500. Also rebuilt the tailgate and new plywood on the sides. Have already reskinned the lower sides but still have to do the uppers and build a new center divider. Sure, I get funny looks at shows when I park next to the big fancy rigs. But I look good walking away with that ribbon. :D

For me, totally worth it to have my own trailer. Do I save $? Probably not. My truck is my daily driver as well. I went about a year and a half without my own trailer. Having always had one as a kid, it was horrible, but I had sold mine when I had quit riding for a few years. I hated having to borrow a trailer, or find a ride with someone else. So worth it to me to be able to hook up and just go wherever I want to go. Trail rides with friends, lesson, little schooling show for half a day. Whatever. No worries about a "friend" backing out the morning of either.

poltroon
Dec. 29, 2011, 11:19 AM
When I boarded in the city, it did take additional time to hook up and unhook because the trailer parking was in the far back o' beyond on the property, and heavily congested. You had to allow an extra 20 minutes for the drive to and from, and the hooking up had to be done right before you left. Often this meant hooking up (and then parking) at night, in the dark, and you had to allow extra time in case someone else's careless parking job created a problem. Since you didn't get to park in the same place, it took extra long to hook up and park because you had to figure out the vagaries of each parking spot. Then, you had to drive to where the horse was to get the horse and whatever tack you needed.

By contrast, now that my horses are at home, I can hook up a day or even days before, my parking space is predictable and level (level is a huge luxury!), and I can unhook the next day. No one parks me in.

There is a semi-public riding arena 5 minutes from my house, and it's no big deal to put the pony on and go.

asterix
Dec. 29, 2011, 01:14 PM
STOCK TRAILER.......Nuff said!!! Apparantly, things are done much differently in the "stock" trailer world.

I'm sorry, did you mean this to be as snotty as it sounds? Perhaps I am slow...

oharabear
Dec. 29, 2011, 01:35 PM
For me, totally worth it to have my own trailer. Do I save $? Probably not. My truck is my daily driver as well. I went about a year and a half without my own trailer. Having always had one as a kid, it was horrible, but I had sold mine when I had quit riding for a few years. I hated having to borrow a trailer, or find a ride with someone else. So worth it to me to be able to hook up and just go wherever I want to go. Trail rides with friends, lesson, little schooling show for half a day. Whatever. No worries about a "friend" backing out the morning of either.

This.

My trailer is a CL "rescue" that is a little 1975 2-horse BP that is - wait for it- Smurf blue. We actually call it "The Smurf." My BO calls it "The Blue Beast."

My friend and I got it for $500 off CL, I got it new tires and re-did the floor, and she had her dad help her with re-wiring it. We had it inspected at our local trailer repair shop, and the guys all kept commenting on how "sturdy" it was, and how they don't make trailers like that anymore.

Yes, it's ugly as sin. Yes, I try to act like I don't know whose trailer it is when we are in the middle of a parking lot with nice rigs. But it is SO worth being able to get up and go when we need to.

I don't even own my own rig- my parents have an F350 that sits in their driveway that they let me commandeer whenever I want, and my friend's hubby works construction, so we often take his work rig. When those fail, my BO's husband also owns a construction company, and so there are always pickups on the property in an emergency (like when I had to haul my gelding to the vet for an emergency, but I had driven my Hyundai to the barn).

It can be done cheaply. But then, I haven't purchased my own truck yet, so ask me this in another year or so, I may have changed my mind. :lol:

englishcowgirl
Dec. 29, 2011, 01:59 PM
I already have a vehicle to pull it and if I found a used 2 horse do you still think it will be much more? I will need a trailer before I go off to college anyway do wouldnt it be beneficial to get it now and save some money possibly.

If you are a trust fund baby please ignore this, as money will not be an issue for you. A truck and trailer is expensive and they break. You will not have the money for this if you are an average middle class student. You will also not have the time. For an average 3 credit hour class its 6 hours of work at home per week. I have had a horse for five years while working on my degrees and showed the last three years. If trailering fees are getting to you, you really can't afford the gas to haul your own. And you need a truck, a real one. Three quarter ton would be best, the smaller ones are not really great for towing if you can avaid them. Sorry but its the honest truth. No you really do not want a trailer or truck and honestly possibly even the horse may be too much to handle while college!!! I have to work as a waitress to afford board and show fees. A typical day consists of: 3 hours of class, to the barn to ride for an hour, 4+ hours of homework, 8 hours of work at the bar. I am lucky if I get 4 hours of sleep a night. I have my heart horse so I put up with it, but any other I would have sold and not ridden while in school.

englishcowgirl
Dec. 29, 2011, 02:09 PM
OMG, show up in a stock trailer. Seriously.

Funny, but sadly true...

So you are entering your trailer in the hunter division instead of the horse?;):lol: Most people don't look twice at a trailer as long as it is safe and well kept. There is NOTHING wrong with a stock trailer, I personally think they are nicer for the horses and less expensive for a sturdier piece of equipment. I have heard many horses go over the front bars or into the hay racks of horse trailers, some need to be put down. Never heard of a horse dying b/c of an average "stock" trailer.

airhorse
Dec. 29, 2011, 02:25 PM
Around here, sadly true. The teenagers with their 20K push button ponies wouldn't be caught dead with a stock trailer...

I have no issues with a stock trailer, YMMV.

deltawave
Dec. 29, 2011, 02:55 PM
Everything has a cost. Either in money, time, convenience, freedom, whatever . . . pretty much a compromise in one area is necessary when one has something good in another.

There's something to be said for having someone else do the hauling, as has been elaborated in detail here. There's also something to be said for having one's own rig. In the first instance, one compromises freedom and flexibility but doesn't have to own an exra vehicle or a trailer, etc. In the latter instance, one has the burden of ownership, etc. etc. etc.

Nothing is for free, and if there was a clear and astounding benefit to everyone to own a truck and trailer, everyone would do so. There is not. It's a luxury (just like horses) and has to be weighed carefully in the "time vs. cost" calculus.

I was smiling about this topic today after the 2nd hour of moving manure, recalling a conversation by a couple of teens who were parked next to me at a show this fall--how it would be "so much easier and less expensive" if they could just keep their horses at home. In a barn that doubtless appeared by magic out of the sky, complete with staff. :lol:

event_ryder
Dec. 29, 2011, 08:58 PM
After a season of begging rides from kindly eventers after original rides would cancel on me, I can only rave about how lovely having ones own rig is! Now- I've been really lucky and was given a beater truck to use ('77 GMC Camper Special) and access to an older heavy steel 2 horse angle haul that I've taken the divider out to fit my big guy in. It inhales fuel... I don't even want to consider what it costs to drive per mile... BUT I will take paying the extra $ to know that I have a way to get out to the show vs. stressing out over who can haul my guy. It really paid for itself when we had a colicky horse that when the vet asked how soon we could get her on the road I told her I could get off property before she did. I do think I pay more then when I shared rides, but the ease of having use of my own rig has more then made up for it.

poltroon
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:07 PM
There is nothing wrong with any safe trailer - stock, old, whatever.

But, it's worth realizing that any trailer that is cheaper is cheaper for a reason, and that reason may or may not be workable for you.

Really old trailers will have much lower quality suspensions, more risk of rust and corrosion, and they tend to be smaller in every dimension. A '75 two horse would probably work fine for my 14 h. mount, but probably not for your 17h warmblood.

Stock trailers cost less not just because of the lack of dividers, but also because they are generally made with a lower quality suspension and lack some horse-friendly amenities. Normally, they would not have a dressing room. When they have those amenities, the savings are not so great.

Stock trailer sides - having slats instead of windows - will save less than $1k on the price of the trailer. The tradeoff isn't so much that you won't "look fancy" but that you don't have screens and that it's less convenient to open and close the 'windows'. Screens keep out flies and bees - more of an issue when standing still or say storing your trailer - than it is when actually transporting horses. There's nothing wrong with choosing the slats - but there is a functional reason to choose something different.

Obviously, if you're willing and able to do a lot of mechanical work on a trailer, you can spend less in purchase - at of course some cost to your time. If that's a good tradeoff for you - excellent! But it's not necessarily an example that most people can follow.

kkindley
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:36 PM
There is nothing wrong with any safe trailer - stock, old, whatever.

But, it's worth realizing that any trailer that is cheaper is cheaper for a reason, and that reason may or may not be workable for you.

Really old trailers will have much lower quality suspensions, more risk of rust and corrosion, and they tend to be smaller in every dimension. A '75 two horse would probably work fine for my 14 h. mount, but probably not for your 17h warmblood.


Obviously, if you're willing and able to do a lot of mechanical work on a trailer, you can spend less in purchase - at of course some cost to your time. If that's a good tradeoff for you - excellent! But it's not necessarily an example that most people can follow.

I don't necessarily agree with the lower quality suspension. They still make many trailers with the same style suspensions as the old ones. The problem is the springs are often flattened, bushings worn out, etc. Springs and related components are CHEAP! I replaced mine that appeared okay, for peace of mind. Eastern Marine has amazing prices, on trailer tires, lights, etc too!!

But yes, they are usually smaller. Mine tracks in my truck tracks. (say that 5 times fast!!) I forget the dimensions, but I have no problem with stall length. It's much narrower, and not overheight, but my 16 hh TB mare fits very comfortably along with a super stocky paint who is quite wide. My fiancee used to haul his 17.2 TB gelding in this same trailer. Horses were just used to smaller. Smaller is not bad, we're just used to everyone having warmblood sized for their 15.2 horse. They had big horses back then too. Sure, it may not be used for a pair of huge drafts, but it is a TB sized trailer. My first as a kid was a QH sized trailer that was slightly smaller

It did take a bit of time to go over, and my fiancee has welders, etc and the knowhow to do the work correctly which saved some money. If you don't have this, it may not be a good option for you. Also, sometimes they are beyond recovery. The frame was solid on mine, except where the ramp attached, but that was easily replaced with a stronger piece. Complete with big D's for rear recovery if needed. I'm proud of my little multicolor grey trailer!

lucyeq
Dec. 29, 2011, 09:44 PM
I don't know what I would do if I didn't have my own trailer. It makes things 100000x easier. I work with trainers other than the one at my barn and to get to shows without my own rig would be a pain. For me, it's cheaper to have my own rig in this situation and way more convenient.

petesperson
Dec. 30, 2011, 08:36 AM
In case the OP or anyone else is interested in a Brenderup, I noticed one on CL:

http://southjersey.craigslist.org/grd/2738596427.html

I'm lucky enough to have a friend with a rig.. I chip in for gas, tolls, and tires. It works for us!

Petstorejunkie
Dec. 30, 2011, 09:03 AM
FREEEEEEDOOOMMM!!!!!
That's the primary perk to owning your own trailer. It works out to cost probably the same. But the ability to get up in the morning and hook up the trailer and go where I want when I want without having to rely on anybody else is priceless

Shagyas Rock
Dec. 30, 2011, 10:44 AM
There have been many fine points made by everyone thus far. I think the feasibility of owning your own rig depends on a lot of disparate factors and everyone's horse owning experiences and demographics vary a little bit.

It is expensive owning your own truck and trailer. . . . my truck doesn't get the best mileage when towing and average cost of a trailering trip can run up to $150 in gas alone. However, where I live, there really aren't any commerical haulers. And few people are comfortable hauling others' horses (or loaning a rig) due to liability -- which is understandable, so owing your own rig in these parts is practically necessary if you want to travel anywhere with your horse.

If you purchase a good quality truck and trailer, the rig can last decades if properly cared for and maintained. Cost of owning a rig for me is probably somewhat less than perhaps other posters, as I keep my horses at home, on a property that is paid for, so I have neither boarding costs nor a mortage. My truck is paid for. I paid cash for my two horse gooseneck, so - no payments. I only pay for insurance, licensing and gasloline. So for me - it's cost effective to have my own truck and trailer.

However I am at a stage in my life where this is possible. When I was younger there was no way it would have been possible. I was single, renting an apartment, paying a car payment, and paying board. Having my own rig was out of the question. So, I think this issue is far from black-and-white and depends on so many factors. I think the thing to do is take into consideration what everyone has said and figure out what is best for you, at this stage in your life.
Someday you will be out of college, and hopefully with a degree and a good job and can start builidng your dream.

eventhorse61
Dec. 30, 2011, 03:04 PM
The freedom, convenience and security of owning your own trailer is absolutely PRICELESS!!!!!!!!! if you can afford it. Still show as you want and eat.

Many Vehicles these days are set to pull. I strongly suggest an all aluminum trailer, frame and all, rubber torsion axles. They are sturdy and light and low maintenance.

The ability to take extra event things and not have to work out of a car trunk at a show....go on the trails and enjoy your horse in other settings on your own terms, storage for those spare event things. I could go on and on....

Trailer ownership is absolute freedom and worth the price

meupatdoes
Dec. 30, 2011, 03:15 PM
Truck -- absolute minimum cost is about $10k.
trailer: absolute minimum about $5k.


Nope.
Truck (80,000 miles): $3,900
Trailer: $2,000

Photo of rig:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/meupatdoes/12937_720462659895_426486_41255561_.jpg*

Total price of entire rig:
less than one Hermes saddle.

*Btw, the horse poking his head out the door is the one who was saved by an emergency trailer ride to Cornell. He would not be in the picture -literally- otherwise.

meupatdoes
Dec. 30, 2011, 03:18 PM
And the approach that meupatdoes takes of hauling horse to vet, farrier, etc. herself, to make the rig save her money is only practical if you don't have a 9-5 desk job. Which I do.

I do have a 9-5 desk job.
5 to 6 horses in full or partial training is on the side.

jenm
Dec. 30, 2011, 03:22 PM
FREEEEEEDOOOMMM!!!!!
That's the primary perk to owning your own trailer. It works out to cost probably the same. But the ability to get up in the morning and hook up the trailer and go where I want when I want without having to rely on anybody else is priceless

This is it exactly. While it is quite convenient to have someone else do the hauling, you are tied to their schedule as far as traveling. I love being able to take off and go anywhere without having to rely on another person's schedule.

:yes:

Insurance isn't very much, and I have it inspected every spring so I practice preventative maintenance rather than emergency fixes.





Photo of rig:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/meupatdoes/12937_720462659895_426486_41255561_.jpg
.

Cute pic of your pony checking out the scenery!

meupatdoes
Dec. 30, 2011, 03:31 PM
HUH? 2-3 hours to hook and drive ? are you sure? Most people I know takes them 10-15 minutes; some barns have grooms which produce blanketed & wrapped horses to be loaded - mine doesn't - takes me 10-15 minutes to wrap and put cooler on said horse.

Yeah... the longest delay I have ever experienced in hooking up the trailer was when I arrived at the barn and my 2WD truck had difficulty making it up the slight incline to get to the hitch (necessitating some rather brisk backing up under the hitch, aka as the "just floor it and pray") and then the hitch was frozen.

Extra time expended involved several seconds of swearing and then schlepping to the bathroom for a bucket of hot water.

3 hours later the horse I was going to pick up from the track was already back home in his new house.


OK guys, I get it that not everyone wants to own a trailer for whatever reason and that is everyone's choice, but if we could not egregiously make up stuff to put in the 'Con' column this could be a more productive discussion for those who may be on the fence to get an HONEST picture of the pros and cons. Indeed it does take more effort to get to the barn and haul your own rather than appearing at the show at 11am and having the steed groomed and waiting, and different people may value the convenience over the money and vice versa, but conversely it also does NOT take 2-3 hours to wrap and load a horse. Good lord, one simple lesson 5 minutes down the road would take the whole day! When I leave for an overnight show the maximum time it takes me to pack and go is 15 minutes to pack (since I am always going off somewhere I just keep my stuff ready to go), and then 40 min per horse for the full show bath +wraps. So yes, I am huffing my own trunk up the ramp but it still does not take several hours.

JWB
Dec. 30, 2011, 09:58 PM
Recently a girl asked me to trailer her horse down to Fort Pierce for her. It was a two hour trip down their, her horse only. I told her I would need $150 to do it an she flipped out, said I was trying to rip her off, and that it was unreasonable to expect $150 for a 115 mile trip.

Here is what she did not take into account:
1) The trip is actually 230 miles for me. I still have to get home
2) My truck/trailer combo gets 7.5 miles per gallon.
3)I'm going to have to put my toddler with a sitter at $8 an hour for the six hours this is going to take

I was trying to be nice and help her out since she needed her horse moved, but at that price, I was just barely meeting expenses, if that.
Cost of gas for that particular trip < $100
Cost of baby sitter: $48
Never mind what my time is worth - I was willing to spend six hours driving because she needed help.

I can't imagine not owning my own trailer at this point because I like the freedom of being able to go to clinics, lessons, shows, and whatever without having to scramble to find a ride, but it is definitely an expense. My Hyundai is gone and I now drive an F-350. It wasn't cheap to buy and it isn't cheap to drive. Forget about parking. My trailer was about $10,000 to buy used, and I know I'm going to have $500-$1000 maintainence on it every year.

I have a trailer. It was a considerable expense, that I decided was well worth it, but I do get a little sore when people expect me to drive them places for little or no cost "as a favor" when every day that I drive around in my truck, I'm paying the price of having a trailer - even if the trailer is parked.

LDavis104
Dec. 31, 2011, 12:45 PM
You may not always be with that trainer who can trailer you... Things happen, people move. While it is easier to have someone trailer for you, there's nothing like being able to go where you want when you want. I trailer off to trail rides, shows, the vet, etc. I did however already have the truck before I got a trailer, so I was 1/2 there.

nextyear
Dec. 31, 2011, 06:23 PM
[QUOTE=JWB;6051982]Recently a girl asked me to trailer her horse down to Fort Pierce for her. It was a two hour trip down their, her horse only. I told her I would need $150 to do it an she flipped out, said I was trying to rip her off, and that it was unreasonable to expect $150 for a 115 mile trip.

QUOTE]

This why it is easier to tell "friends" nope can't do call Lorraine or Brook Ledge, they can do it cheaper.
When my horse went to track in Miami I brought him down but only so I could settle him in, for the $$ Lorraine charged for the trip between fuel and time it was cheaper to have them ship him back up to Ocala.