PDA

View Full Version : Lisa Marie Fergusson relief fund



notsureyet
Dec. 16, 2011, 04:34 PM
Many of you know that Lisa Fergusson lost her Olympic hopeful and best bud, Smart Move, in a tragic accident this week. Lisa's a self-made rider with no big financial backing and the loss of this horse has been devastating to her both personally, professionally, and financially. Here's an opportunity to help out.

There are a couple of relief funds set up for her - one is here:
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Lisa-Marie-Fergusson-Relief-Fund/283865494998432

And if you want to donate to a tax deductible organization, www.Eventingnation.com has that option too.

Laurierace
Dec. 16, 2011, 04:43 PM
Wasn't the horse insured? Money won't fix a broken heart but it will allow her to go shopping for a new one.

good booie
Dec. 16, 2011, 04:47 PM
I don't know. This just doesn't present right. Yes, she lost her horse due to a tragic accident but fundraising? Seriously? I lost my horse this past September due to a tragic (long) illness. Should I set up a fundraiser? My vet bills are through the roof and he is still dead....

Flame suit on but I don't like it. and the horse wasn't insured. really? that's just plain stupid at that level.

notsureyet
Dec. 16, 2011, 04:53 PM
Smartie's insurance as due to kick in Jan 1st - tough break. Hey, there are a million different good placves to direct your giving. Lisa has worked incredibly hard with little to no external resources and had the worst luck in the world. That horse was her only asset of value (she has a truck and trailer and that's it). Should he have been insured? Absolutely. Point taken. But this horse was her whole career.

If this isn't for you, please just move on and find a cause that is better for you.

PolarXtu
Dec. 16, 2011, 04:59 PM
This is the strangest thing ever.

When comparing Boyd's fundraiser (barn burnt down, father died, horses injured in fire...) to Lisa's fundraiser, it just seems... silly. Deepest condolences to Lisa, I do feel for her, but this is strange.

NCRider
Dec. 16, 2011, 05:13 PM
I'm sorry, but as much as I like and respect Boyd and fully understand and support the efforts to help him rebuild after last year's tragedy, to argue against supporting this woman just because her tragedy wasn't as "big" as Boyd's is nuts.

From a financial and career perspective, she's in far worse shape than he was. This was her one big horse. She lost her last big horse in a very tragic way at an event. She just wrote a beautiful essay on how this horse helped her deal with the pain of losing the last one. She doesn't have a ton of sponsors, owners, etc. She is not the "it" girl of Canadian eventing.

I never understand why people have to come on and criticize other people for who/what they choose to support. Compared to feeding starving children, most donations aren't "worthy" but all of it makes a differnce to the person helped.

Divine Comedy
Dec. 16, 2011, 05:17 PM
I'm sorry, but as much as I like and respect Boyd and fully understand and support the efforts to help him rebuild after last year's tragedy, to argue against supporting this woman just because her tragedy wasn't as "big" as Boyd's is nuts.

From a financial and career perspective, she's in far worse shape than he was. This was her one big horse. She lost her last big horse in a very tragic way at an event. She just wrote a beautiful essay on how this horse helped her deal with the pain of losing the last one. She doesn't have a ton of sponsors, owners, etc. She is not the "it" girl of Canadian eventing.

I never understand why people have to come on and criticize other people for who/what they choose to support. Compared to feeding starving children, most donations aren't "worthy" but all of it makes a differnce to the person helped.

Agreed. If you don't agree with the cause, don't donate. Simple as that.

lizanne
Dec. 16, 2011, 05:50 PM
I donated. I put myself in her position, losing my one top horse who I love so so much, and understanding the insurance is really expensive for horses (almost not worth it). I am sure she would appreciate all the help she can get. Although I don't know her, she seems no less deserving than anyone else to receive our help. I couldn't imagine losing Tom in such a tragic accident. And I know for sure that I wouldn't appreciate people commenting on whether I deserved help or not.

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 16, 2011, 06:04 PM
Agreed. If you don't agree with the cause, don't donate. Simple as that.


So true. Insurance is NOT a simple brainless decision. Insurance is a gamble...you are gambling you will need and the Insurance company is gambling that you don't. It is not something I expect every horse owner to have...even at the elite levels.

In the end, there are a lot of various causes out there that people do and don't support.

She has some good friends who have made it easy for people to contribute if they want.

Just as we can contribute to other people who are fundraising for a competition.....or the kids down the street to go to Band competition....or Girl Scouts....or starving kids ....or donations for christmas gifts etc.

I have no problem with it....and in fact, sent some money. It will not bring her horse back but hopefully it will help a little....and the donation was made easy by her friends setting up this fund.

We do have to first know a person needs help......and if you do let people know...you may be surprised at who lends a hand.

I send money to a lot of other causes. I also don't have a problem or think any less of someone who choses to spend their money any other way.

AlterEgoME
Dec. 16, 2011, 06:43 PM
I donated. I put myself in her position, losing my one top horse who I love so so much, and understanding the insurance is really expensive for horses (almost not worth it). I am sure she would appreciate all the help she can get. Although I don't know her, she seems no less deserving than anyone else to receive our help. I couldn't imagine losing Tom in such a tragic accident. And I know for sure that I wouldn't appreciate people commenting on whether I deserved help or not.

How do you conclude as part of this tragedy that insurance is "not worth it". The horse's actual value aside, you can insure for any amount you like and receive mortality and for an additional few hundred dollars, major medical. I have several horses. Over the course of the years, major medical has paid for itself. None of my horses are insured for what it would cost to replace them, but for enough to pay to lay them to rest and buy another young one and also get me $7500 to $10,000 in major medical, which always gets used over the course of time with horses at this level. A soft tissue injury will cost $7500 in shock wave, rechecks, surpass and farm calls. For $25,000 in mortality (and you can certainly choose less) you pay less than $2000.

My deepest condolences to LM.

3phase
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:00 PM
I know Lisa personally and know she loves her horses to bits! This is a huge loss for her as was Uni-not easy being so close to your dreams twice and have it slip it away by such tragedy. It is a big loss for everyone connected as well!
I too had a couple horses pass away from tragic events-both of them were just greenies but still hurt a lot. One I was just about to put insurance on but hadn't finished the paperwork. the other I had insured for 3 years, sold and bought back and a day later he broke his leg in the paddock so I never got the chance to get the paperwork done. Horses are so big yet so fragile! I had my Novice pony insured for $10k for 5 years plus major medical and never a scratch on him but at least the reassurance was there if anything did happen.

I'm so sad for Lisa and everyone involved and hope she's able to bounce back quickly! She has some lovely prospects-hopefully something higher up can come her way soon though :)

JER
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:20 PM
I put myself in her position, losing my one top horse who I love so so much, and understanding the insurance is really expensive for horses (almost not worth it).

No. No. No. No.

Insurance -- which can be paid in installments -- is not 'really expensive' (in the context of horse ownership and competition) nor 'almost not worth it'.

As AlterEgoME, insurance is worth it. Colic surgery? Shock wave treatment? Anything requiring hospitalization? All that would be paid for, at a cost to you of $100-150/month. If you can't afford that, you are probably living on a very risky edge and shouldn't be out there in your truck and trailer going to competitions.


So true. Insurance is NOT a simple brainless decision. Insurance is a gamble...you are gambling you will need and the Insurance company is gambling that you don't. It is not something I expect every horse owner to have...even at the elite levels.

You do have to consider the horse. I have one horse who competed to Prelim but I never insured because he is not a good candidate for hospitalization, surgery or any long-term rehab issue. He hates confinement and would be miserable to the extent that it would be unfair not to put him down. I accepted this as who he is and thus did not insure him. I did, however, have insurance on him when I shipped him out to CA.


not easy being so close to your dreams twice and have it slip it away by such tragedy.

Yes, it's tough. I know that because I've had to put two horses down with broken legs. One this year, one 12 years ago. You think it can't happen again, that you've already done your penance, that it's less likely than winning the lottery. Wrong.

But then you should also have insurance. If not the first time, then definitely the second time around.


I too had a couple horses pass away from tragic events-both of them were just greenies but still hurt a lot. One I was just about to put insurance on but hadn't finished the paperwork. the other I had insured for 3 years, sold and bought back and a day later he broke his leg in the paddock so I never got the chance to get the paperwork done.

You're making excuses. The paperwork is simple. You can even do it online and have the policy in place in one quick phone call or email.

If you buy a horse, get the insurance on before it arrives at your house. What if it gets injured en route?

We all agree that what happened to Lisa is a tragedy. It really shook me up personally after what I went through this year with my own horse. But let's not make excuses for not having insurance on a horse of this quality, especially if you are not financially secure enough to pay out of pocket. Do without that new saddle, use that old set of boots one more time, share a bridle with your other horses, but do not go uninsured.

Aikenites
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:29 PM
I don't know. This just doesn't present right. Yes, she lost her horse due to a tragic accident but fundraising? Seriously? I lost my horse this past September due to a tragic (long) illness. Should I set up a fundraiser? My vet bills are through the roof and he is still dead....

Flame suit on but I don't like it. and the horse wasn't insured. really? that's just plain stupid at that level.

I have to agree. It breaks my heart that this happened to her expecially after her submission to EN on Monday. I think the horse was a superstar and think this was such a tragedy, but I agree, the horse should have been insured- I don't have much, a limited budget and my horse isn't at the upper levels yet, but he is insured non the less. I find it very important to have him insured, maybe not for full value but what I can afford for major medical and mortality.

But to this person's point- which is VERY VALID, many of us lose our equine partner and don't have fund raising to help support that loss. I think that Boyd's loss is of a differnt nature in extent vs the loss of a horse. But if you want to donate great, if not, then that is fine too. I just find it odd too, that a donation was set up for this cause.....

Let's put it this way, if I lost one of my horses, would you donate to me to help me pay the costs associated with the loss and find a new prospect? i highly doubt it. Even if i was a contributor on EN. I don't have sponsors, or a trustfund- so essentially I would be in the same boat (except I haven't declared for an Olympic team)

Just my thoughts...

AlterEgoME
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:32 PM
As soon as the wire is initiated or the check signed the horse should be insured. I have called several different agents on a Sunday afternoon, while at a horse show to bind the insurance on a new purchase. Again, my heart goes out to Lisa Marie. Youth is full of hope and that is what us old people love about being around the young and carefree, but please, on this topic, listen to the old and wrinkled. Put the minimum mortality on the horse to cover the expenses of a tragic accident, god forbid, and get some medical coverage. I have hit the cap on my major medical three different times and used portions more times than I can count. One horse was 5 at the time, worth about $50K, insured for $25K, as a result of being insured, we did a nuke scan and found a hairline fracture that was making him NQR 1 day out of 5. He has fully recovered and has a current value of about $100K as a Hunter Derby horse and is STILL insured for $25K with a $7500 major medical policy.

poltroon
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:32 PM
How do you conclude as part of this tragedy that insurance is "not worth it". The horse's actual value aside, you can insure for any amount you like and receive mortality and for an additional few hundred dollars, major medical. I have several horses. Over the course of the years, major medical has paid for itself. None of my horses are insured for what it would cost to replace them, but for enough to pay to lay them to rest and buy another young one and also get me $7500 to $10,000 in major medical, which always gets used over the course of time with horses at this level. A soft tissue injury will cost $7500 in shock wave, rechecks, surpass and farm calls. For $25,000 in mortality (and you can certainly choose less) you pay less than $2000.

My deepest condolences to LM.

If your experience were typical, the insurance company would go out of business.

Aikenites
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:36 PM
My horse is insured for 25k for major medical and mortality. It is $950/ yr. That may mean a few less shows, but it is worth it so I have something to fall back on. Yes, I paid it in full, but as JER said you can pay in installments and when I started the policy, it started as soon as I said yes to the company.

AlterEgoME
Dec. 16, 2011, 08:52 PM
If your experience were typical, the insurance company would go out of business.

My experiences don't have to be typical, they are just mine. Lisa Marie's are probably also not typical.

I am not made whole and certain portions of the MM are paid by me, but the question of "should I do the nuke scan?" is completely eliminated. As are the questions of whether to shock wave. And of course, if one of my horses were to be euthenized I would have $25K in my pocket and a limited $ of outstanding bills, so I *could* go out and buy another horse versus the very deep hole this poor girl is currently in.

Divine Comedy
Dec. 16, 2011, 09:10 PM
I have discussed insurance with a few different trainers, most of which had competed up to Advanced or higher. All of them strongly recommended that I insure my own horse (which I do). However, none of them insured their horses as common practice.

Why?

Because they all owned enough horses that the cost of insuring all of them was far more expensive than just dealing with the vet bills should something happen. Say you own ten horses, and insure each for $1000 for major medical/mortality. That's $10K per year right there, not exactly pocket change. You might end up with no colics/injuries one year and you've saved $10K. One might colic/injure, and you're paying $3-8K, and that is still less than you would have paid in insurance premiums. Then again, three might injure/colic at $3-8K apiece in one year. You never know. However, most trainers I know weigh the risks and decide not to insure.

Now, I don't know how many horses Lisa owns. Honestly, the $3K of vet bills/cremation doesn't seem that much more than what it would cost to insure him for his FULL value as a potential Olympic competitor. Almost everyone insures horses for less than they are worth to reduce the premiums on mortality, so it is unlikely that she would be able to replace Smartie with a horse with similar talent and experience with what she would have received from insurance. She might have had enough to get another young horse, but she can't replace the position Smartie put her in as a possible Olympic contender.

I guess I'm just not shocked and astonished like many people seem to be that Smartie wasn't insured. Most professionals I know don't insure their horses, and she could very well be taking her cue from the rest of the industry professionals. I'm sure she sat down and thought about it, maybe discussed it with a peer or mentor. I doubt she just 'forgot' to insure him.

And in any case, she wasn't the one to organize the fundraising effort, probably didn't even ask for it at all. No need to jump all over her for that. Just don't donate if you don't feel comfortable with it. That's all you have to do.

asterix
Dec. 16, 2011, 09:26 PM
I have no idea of the economics of owning 10 horses, and I certainly would never want to cast a pall over anyone who has just had such a horrible accident (and furthermore agree that we can all choose where to send our charitable dollars, without the need to comment on others' choices).

But in the spirit of providing some positive dialogue out of a tragic incident, I wanted to chime in about insurance, from the perspective of someone who is only going to own one or two at a time.

It is VERY easy to put a binder on the horse before it walks out of the vet clinic after the PPE. If you decide insurance is affordable for you and worth it, DO IT THEN. DO NOT WAIT. I can't tell you how many stories I have heard that started "I was going to insure him..."

It really doesn't take long AT ALL.

I have had a horse that never used a dime of his insurance, a horse that used a lot of major medical in certain years, and one that was both a chronic problem and broke his leg in a freak pasture accident.

I have been perfectly happy to write the "throwing money away" check on the healthy one, very relieved that I had insurance to cover the expensive treatments for the injured one, and devastated by having to cash the mortality check on the third.

But that check enabled me to go out and buy another horse, when I was able to face it. Otherwise, no dice.

It's a personal decision. But it does not have to cost an arm and a leg (again, not talking 10 horses), and it CAN be done before you sign the check to buy the horse.

3phase
Dec. 16, 2011, 10:29 PM
Insurance or no insurance, someone said it before, it doesn't lessen the pain or heartbreak-money can't always buy back what you lost.
Everyone has their reasons for doing something.
Let's put the insurance issues on a different thread and keep this one for what it is than-LMF Relief Fund
:)

AlterEgoME
Dec. 16, 2011, 11:42 PM
Money can never buy back what you lose.

lizanne
Dec. 16, 2011, 11:59 PM
Ok, ok. First, I didn't say insurance wasn't worth it at all, I said it's almost not worth it. Just to be clear, my top horse IS insured. After two colic surgeries (second one so minor the vets were confused as to why he wouldn't pass on his own) and a bone chip removed, this horse is the poster boy for one who should insure a horse. Insurance can be expensive when you have many horses going at once, as explained in an earlier post. That is what I was trying to get to about cost of insurance, but did not make myself clear. So let me clear, INSURANCE IS GOOD, I can just understand why one would wait on getting it.

Lone
Dec. 17, 2011, 12:15 AM
Money can never buy back what you lose.

I disagree to an extent. Certainly, it will never bring back the horse you love, but having the financial ability to to purchase another horse will help with the healing.

I lost my much-loved mare about a year and a half ago, and I miss her an incredible amount. When I lost her, I not only lost my heart mare, I lost riding as well. Due to my finances I'm not in the position to purchase another horse, and probably won't be for a while. Having the funds or financial support to still be riding would help me significantly.

Anyway, I don't have the funds to donate, but I am certainly sympathetic to Lisa's loss, I wish her the best.

Foxtrot's
Dec. 17, 2011, 12:39 AM
Eventers are an especially caring group and can empathise with the complete
unfairness of losing a horse in such a manner. The sport is tough and with a "there but for the grace of God go I" attitude I'm sure many who can support her will - every little bit helps. No obligation. Hard to believe she would lose her dreams not once, but twice, through circumstances beyond her control.

I don't know the story, but the boarding farm might/should have insurance.

gold2012
Dec. 17, 2011, 05:33 AM
Ok, I am a bit confused.

I don't understand why Lisa's tragedy should be any differant then Boyd's.

It was everywhere to donate to him, Phillip, the working students!?! As I understood this, wasn't the reason we were all helping out....there was no insurance? I mean, everywhere you went were buttons to donate to that. I even think it was mentioned funds were going to Phillip to help rebuild his barn. I would have thought property insurance would have covered that?

Yet I saw very little belly-aching going on about why didn't they have insurance?! IF TPF and Boyd can't afford insurance, why would a rider like Lisa be any different?

I find it sad that if a Golden Boy of eventing has tragedy strike, the wagons rallying is phenomenal. I don't know Lisa, nor her financial situation, but I don't think she is any less deserving of help then any of the other equestrians wanting help.

It's an individual's option who or if they help. Personally, I found a K-Mart, and helped non-horsey people.

Lisa, I'm very sorry for your loss!

IronwoodFarm
Dec. 17, 2011, 07:08 AM
I think in the TPF/Boyd Martin fire, there were numerous parties and losses involved. I was not in the least concerned about rebuilding the TPF barn -- there should have been insurance on it. I was concerned about the grooms who sustained medical injuries and had losses that were not covered by any insurance. They were brave folks and deserved some support.

As for BNTs not insuring horses.....I'm not sure about that. At the top, so many of their horses are owned by others who definitely do buy insurance. The individual riders with only one top horse also seem to insure that horse. If you have a string, you still can insure the one(s) that are most valuable. So, it's an unfortunate choice not to insure.

But the biggest exposure that Ms. Ferguson is facing is not the loss of her horse. The horse was hit by a car. What happened to the car and driver? Yes it was an accident, but I can assure you that the driver's auto carrier will be looking for compensation. Equine liability insurance costs about $150 a year and covers situations exactly like this one. I only show my horses at the lowest level, but I am all too aware of what can happen when a horse gets loose at a HT or show ground.

snoopy
Dec. 17, 2011, 07:40 AM
I think in the TPF/Boyd Martin fire, there were numerous parties and losses involved. I was not in the least concerned about rebuilding the TPF barn -- there should have been insurance on it. I was concerned about the grooms who sustained medical injuries and had losses that were not covered by any insurance. They were brave folks and deserved some support.

As for BNTs not insuring horses.....I'm not sure about that. At the top, so many of their horses are owned by others who definitely do buy insurance. The individual riders with only one top horse also seem to insure that horse. If you have a string, you still can insure the one(s) that are most valuable. So, it's an unfortunate choice not to insure.

But the biggest exposure that Ms. Ferguson is facing is not the loss of her horse. The horse was hit by a car. What happened to the car and driver? Yes it was an accident, but I can assure you that the driver's auto carrier will be looking for compensation. Equine liability insurance costs about $150 a year and covers situations exactly like this one. I only show my horses at the lowest level, but I am all too aware of what can happen when a horse gets loose at a HT or show ground.

Great Post!

NeverTime
Dec. 17, 2011, 10:42 AM
As I understood this, wasn't the reason we were all helping I mean, everywhere you went were buttons to donate to that. I even think it was mentioned funds were going to Phillip to help rebuild his barn. I would have thought property insurance would have covered that?


To clarify, Phillip & Evie stated repeatedly that they were taking NONE of te recovery funds, and that their property damages would be covered by insurance. (I beleive they are now building a home in place ofte destroyed barn.) So let's not drag them into this unfairly.

akor
Dec. 17, 2011, 12:19 PM
It was very sad to read about yet another loss for her. It has to feel like "something" up/out there is "out to get you." I cannot fathom, and do not want to fathom, what it felt like when she found out what had occurred.

However, I am unable to reconcile her recent blog on eventing nation about maturing and growing up and learning from her mistakes and the downside of letting ego take over and such and this failure to protect herself finanically when she all too well knows tradgey can happen at any time. To me, that is a lot of ego at work, if only thinking that other people will take care of it for you...

Note that I am intentionally avoiding the word insurance. Every situation is different and I leave it up to others to decide if they want to "self - insure". She apparently had not done that either.

jigskoppy
Dec. 17, 2011, 06:36 PM
My condolences to Lisa. I don't know her personally but I can only imagine the heartache with not only losing your equine partner but your dream for the future as well. My hope is that she will continue to persevere and not let these setbacks deter her from her competitive goals.
It also got me to thinking that having "team" horses that could be paired with talented riders would be a great idea. I know that people have mentioned it on COTH as the way it was done years ago. It just seems like it would make sense so that tragedies such as losing your horse would not mean the end of your competitive dreams as well.

gold2012
Dec. 17, 2011, 07:39 PM
To clarify, Phillip & Evie stated repeatedly that they were taking NONE of te recovery funds, and that their property damages would be covered by insurance. (I beleive they are now building a home in place ofte destroyed barn.) So let's not drag them into this unfairly.

I stand corrected. I didn't stay current on that. But I still think it isup to individuals if they do or do not wish to help.