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llevent
Dec. 8, 2011, 12:34 PM
So, I have a really nice little pony for sale. On his online ad, I put may trade, because i would certainly trade for a nice young event prospect. I received an email from a woman who wants to trade her 7yo imported Rhinelander gelding for the pony. They have their horse advertised in the low 5-figure range, and my pony is now listed in the 4-figure range. She has sent me video and photos of the horse, and he looks nice.

My first thought is he's crazy or unsound or both. According to her he's not, and I am welcome to try him out. I would never trade sight unseen, and would definitely do a PPE. They have a large barn and do lessons, hence why they would want a pony. Maybe because of the economy he isn't selling and they want something for their lesson program so they want to trade? I really don't know.

What are your thoughts? Do you think this sounds unreasonable or sketchy? DO I even bother going to see the horse?

IronwoodFarm
Dec. 8, 2011, 12:41 PM
Is she talking an even trade or is it pony + cash? Clarify that point.

If the deal is to your liking, I would take the next step and look at the gelding.

I don't think it's a scam. The worst you are going to be out is the time and expense of seeing the horse.

kookicat
Dec. 8, 2011, 02:26 PM
I'd at least look at the horse (and maybe to a PPE) before making up my mind.

Could you book a lesson or something so you can take a look at the horse without them knowing that you'll be there? (Or ask a friend to go for you.)

groom
Dec. 8, 2011, 02:31 PM
Could you book a lesson or something so you can take a look at the horse without them knowing that you'll be there? (Or ask a friend to go for you.)


Hmm. You are afraid of being deceived so you practice deception?

VicariousRider
Dec. 8, 2011, 03:27 PM
I would just get to the point. Given that their horse is listed for sale at a price point that exceeds the price being asked for your pony you could just bring that up. When you call to schedule the appointment to try him express your interest and then say "Given the differences in listed prices, why are you interested in a trade?" They may give you a dishonest answer, but it's worth asking IMO. I would go look at him, though. They may just need to get another cost out the door before a new one comes in.

Beam Me Up
Dec. 8, 2011, 03:44 PM
Actually, I think the fact that they have a listing for the horse already to be NOT fishy.

Whether I check "may trade" or not on the online ads, I always get offers of trades that are in no way comparable (would you like to trade your made jumper for my unbroke morgan stallion, 1974 station wagon, etc.).

So I don't think it is a scam by intent. I do think the odds of 2 people having each others' dream horse, at comparable prices, that both vet, is so low that I usually just accept selling old horse and buying new horse as separate transactions, but if you're interested in their prospect, you should try it out and see if the trade is interesting to both of you.

Good luck.

kinnip
Dec. 8, 2011, 04:07 PM
At 7 years old, and staying in a large lesson barn, I'd assume the horse has been out and about. Ask around. Someone has probably seen him at a show, or ridden him in a lesson, or even PPEd him already. I've dodged more than a few bullets just by asking around about a horse.

kookicat
Dec. 8, 2011, 04:15 PM
Hmm. You are afraid of being deceived so you practice deception?

No, it just chance to get an honest look at the horse.

deltawave
Dec. 8, 2011, 04:20 PM
Treat the gelding as a horse that you might be interested in buying. If he doesn't suit, don't trade just for the sake of thinking you got a "good deal" because of the price difference. Good ponies are worth a lot to the right home.

I also would be cheerfully blunt about it--"why would you want to trade a $15,000 horse for my $8,000 pony?"

bizbachfan
Dec. 8, 2011, 04:22 PM
I seem to notice people listing horses at prices they really don't expect to get, so wondering what she really wants for her horse, perhaps she has realized she had it way overpriced? We have two horses at our barn purchased in the last few years who were originally advertised in the 5 figure range and both were purchased in a mid 4 figure range.

groom
Dec. 8, 2011, 05:41 PM
No, it just chance to get an honest look at the horse.


Ah. I understand.;)

OverandOnward
Dec. 8, 2011, 08:39 PM
I seem to notice people listing horses at prices they really don't expect to get, so wondering what she really wants for her horse, perhaps she has realized she had it way overpriced? We have two horses at our barn purchased in the last few years who were originally advertised in the 5 figure range and both were purchased in a mid 4 figure range.Exactly.

It is one thing to advertise a horse for 5 figures, it is another thing to actually sell it for that. And of course the same goes for getting the price you would like for your pony.

I agree with a forthcoming discussion of why they are suggesting what seems to be an uneven trade. I would not speculate on the gelding until you have a chance to thoroughly evaluate him as you would any horse you are thinking of buying.

Also, whatever values are used for advertising are not as important as your satisfaction with the outcome of any deal you do. IMO focus on the horses more than the numbers. :)

slp2
Dec. 8, 2011, 09:07 PM
I would check out the horse and ask some questions. Who knows what the entire story is?

At our barn there is a gelding for sale that has been "in training" with the barn dressage trainer for a couple years. He is fairly attractive, and has gone around a few events, and is a WB cross--so he should be fairly marketable. But he isn't a fancy mover, has an unconventional jumping style, and can be a tough ride. They have him priced at 20K and frankly, I think he's worth about $7500. Not too shockingly, few people have come to look at him and no one has come back after they saw him once. The owner of the horse is starting to get fed up with paying board and training fees. Supposedly (not sure if this is true), the owner said that she was going to give the horse to the trainer if he didn't sell by spring (essentially leaving the trainer with another board bill to pay). In that scenario, I could totally see said trainer wanting to "trade" the horse for a more marketable horse.

SonnysMom
Dec. 8, 2011, 09:17 PM
The gelding's seller may have priced the gelding with room to negotiate the price down and room for multiple trainer commissions.
Having to pay commissions to both the buyer's trainer and her trainer can get expensive in a hurry.

Gelding may not be suitable for a lesson horse but do well as a privately owned horse. Some horses prefer one rider to multiple riders each day/week. Or maybe they have lots of beginner kids and gelding is really only suitable for intermediate or better rider.
It certainly simplifies things for them if they can trade the gelding for pony. They may be willing to take a slight hit on the price to free up the stall for a horse that they will make money on rather than break even or lose money on.

Certainly worth looking at gelding to see if you click. If you do, get a PPE and ask around to see if anybody knows anything about him. You might even get an opportunity to talk to other boarders at the barn about him.

llevent
Dec. 9, 2011, 12:02 AM
Thank you everyone for your input. I think I will go check him out. I was just nervous about him being crazy/unsound, but a PPE should find any problems. I also will ask about the price difference-- hadn't yet because I wanted to feel the woman's personality out, and she seems nice.

Thanks again!

Carol Ames
Dec. 9, 2011, 10:56 AM
Good point and winter IS coming:cry:!
:sadsmile:They may just need to get another cost out the door before a new one comes in. __________________

Carol Ames
Dec. 9, 2011, 11:03 AM
There is nothing more frustrating:o to an owner whoMUST sell a horse then having someone call and ask why the horse is priced "so low:mad:"

Carol Ames
Dec. 9, 2011, 12:16 PM
Would your instructor look at the horse for you?

fordtraktor
Dec. 9, 2011, 03:36 PM
I would be worried about crazy/unsound, too, OP, since it probably cost as much as your pony is worth to just import the Rhinelander. Not to mention buy it. Rarely see imports go in that range unless they have issues. I'd be careful.

Of course there are plenty of reasons why someone may have to price low to move one quick, but still...I would proceed, just with caution.

Definitely go look!

ACMEeventing
Dec. 9, 2011, 05:18 PM
Treat the gelding as a horse that you might be interested in buying. If he doesn't suit, don't trade just for the sake of thinking you got a "good deal" because of the price difference. Good ponies are worth a lot to the right home.

I also would be cheerfully blunt about it--"why would you want to trade a $15,000 horse for my $8,000 pony?"

Exactly. And if he does turn out to be something you would have picked independent of a trade than get a thorough PPE (with bloodwork to rule out pain meds and calmers)

Tiffani B
Dec. 9, 2011, 05:32 PM
I even-traded a horse we had advertised for $25k for a horse advertised at $10k. I think I got the better part of the deal, although they think THEY got the better deal. IMHO, that is the best kind of deal, when both parties are happy. :winkgrin:

You never know - some people undervalue their horse, others overvalue it. I know my horse was overpriced and I would have been happy to get $10k, so I was happy to trade. (Trainer priced her, not me!)

Go take a look, do a PPE and make sure that includes a blood draw to test for any kind of drugs (ACE, bute, etc) that might be masking a physical or mental condition.

Good luck!

wanderlust
Dec. 9, 2011, 05:41 PM
Could be something as simple as the owner has a barn full of ponies, doesn't have time for her warmblood, and may not be well-connected enough to sell him for a good price. The expensive, fancy imports usually sell through trainers and word of mouth. The market is NOT good in many areas- the very high-end stuff is selling, as is the very bottom, but it seems people are having a harder time moving that $15k-$65k (give or take) range.

Or, he could be crazy. Won't know until you try him.

Carol Ames
Dec. 10, 2011, 02:31 PM
A number of imports come with xrays which, make them unsaleable:sadsmile: in the US and are nerved:eek: to make them rideable/ saleable :mad:mention this to your trainer and vet so, they can watch for any signs, "stabbing motion/ tendency to stumble:eek: 'in front, stumble but, I do know of some who, have competed successfully in Grand Prixes, showjumping.OTOH:cool:, they can be quite dangerous; my left shoulder / arm were not useable before the strokes due to a severely broken collarbone from a fall of horse in the indoor arena , at the trot:mad: resulting from a slight "misstep; I learned later thathe trainer there thought the mare may have been nerved:o; she was a beautiful mare:yes:;), double registered Dutch:cool: and Holsteiner

ChelseaR
Dec. 13, 2011, 12:21 AM
A number of imports come with xrays which, make them unsaleable:sadsmile: in the US and are nerved:eek: to make them rideable/ saleable :mad:mention this to your trainer and vet so, they can watch for any signs, "stabbing motion/ tendency to stumble:eek: 'in front, stumble but, I do know of some who, have competed successfully in Grand Prixes, showjumping.OTOH:cool:, they can be quite dangerous; my left shoulder / arm were not useable before the strokes due to a severely broken collarbone from a fall of horse in the indoor arena , at the trot:mad: resulting from a slight "misstep; I learned later thathe trainer there thought the mare may have been nerved:o; she was a beautiful mare:yes:;), double registered Dutch:cool: and Holsteiner

I have also seen this type of situation more than once unfortunately.

wolfmare
Dec. 13, 2011, 10:04 AM
Curious OP what was the result of this? Have you looked?

llevent
Dec. 13, 2011, 12:51 PM
I havn't gone to look yet. I've been busy with finals. I will post an update when that happens. Thanks again, everyone.