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Nojacketrequired
Nov. 21, 2011, 02:26 PM
...in a video of a horse that is just learning to jump?

As a dressage rider, I'm at a bit of a loss on what the sales video should look like.
The mare is solidly well-broke Training Level on the flat and has just begun some o/f work so is green over fences, and I've had all sorts of suggestions on what to put on a video but some seem counter to each other.
- flat work w/t/c, lead change each direction, trot in over small x and canter to an oxer. (2'6")
-minimal flat work and a small course of vertical, x to oxer, vertical across the diagonal to 3 stride vertical combo. (2'6" to 2'9")
-flat work, lead change, plus trot X to triple bar (no suggestion on height...I'm assuming as high as she can do comfortably?)
- flat work and small course, trotting between fences, cantering between combinations.

So, the flat work is no problem of course but I want to be sure to show what people want without over-doing it.

Also, is it of use to shows things like how well she stands for mounting, and video of conformation, or are those things for later?

Thanks, NJR

alliekat
Nov. 21, 2011, 02:56 PM
The video should show what she is advertised as being capable of doing. If it says she is great on the flat, jumps a small course and had her changes, I want to see that. I personally always make 2 videos. One that shows everything you would want to see, Conformation, front and side view, Mounting, more flat work, jumping and other stuff like them on the cross ties, being groomed. Then I also edit that one down to just show a smaller portion of W/T/C, jumping and changes each way. Some people want to see everything and some just want to see the meat and potatoes. That way you can let the prospective buyer decided.

AmmyByNature
Nov. 21, 2011, 02:59 PM
What are you advertising that she can do? I'd want to see that. If you say she does courses, I want to see that. If you say she has a lead change, i want to see that.

And I don't care if she's perfect, for a green horse. If she chips or peeks, I want to see how she handles it, so don't kill yourself in the editing room.

I personally don't care about the extra stuff. Photos are good for conformation, and I'm not going to watch a video that's more than about 5 minutes. If I'm serious about it I'll either ask for more information or I'll come ride the thing and see for myself!

eta: or in other words, Ditto alliekat!

alliekat
Nov. 21, 2011, 03:21 PM
And I don't care if she's perfect, for a green horse. If she chips or peeks, I want to see how she handles it, so don't kill yourself in the editing room.


I have to agree with this 110%. I personally like to see a mistake and how they deal with it/recover than bad video editing any day.

AmmyByNature
Nov. 21, 2011, 03:24 PM
I have to agree with this 110%. I personally like to see a mistake and how they deal with it/recover than bad video editing any day.

I bought my first horse because of how he handled it when I crashed him though a vertical!

Linny
Nov. 21, 2011, 04:37 PM
I'm no horse pro but I am in marketing: Remember, sales videos are "Short Attention Span Theater."

Walk, trot, canter then canter the diagonal and show me the lead change and a turn the other direction. A nice downward transition to the trot might help me see how horse balances itself. Then walk. Maybe a bit of the horse moving toward the camera to show her action. No need to show 6 circuits of the arena.

As for the jumping, show the biggest or hardest thing she can do WELL. If she's pretty dependable cantering a 2 '6 course, show it. If she's able to trot in canter out a 2'6 vertical to a 2'9 oxer, show that too. If she changes leads easily on course be sure you get changes of direction. If she's still not really good at something don't push her just to get that one time out of 5 that she gets it. When the potential buyer shows up she will think that the mare is automaic at it because they saw it on the video.

Buyers expect (right or wrong) that the horse they saw on the video will be what they get to see and ride. If she looks easy and ammy friendly (even if green) and she's really a fire breathing dragon for anyone but a pro they will find out in time. I wouldn't mind seeing a mistake or two and with a young horse it's nice to see how they handle some pilot error. Don't aim for "perfect" aim for a truthful representation.

Nojacketrequired
Nov. 21, 2011, 09:54 PM
Thanks, those things help.

Because I am advertising her as having dressage training, would it make sense to put the hunter flat work and the dressage "frame" flatwork on the same video before the jumping or should all the dressage work be separate?

Does the idea of dressage turn off the average hunter or does it help that they know they are very broke on the flat?

NJR

NSRider
Nov. 21, 2011, 11:54 PM
Here are my two cents for a sale video, a don't and a possible do:
don't use slow motion!
for an idea of editing, watch some sales videos and try and figure out where you either lose interest in the video. For giving a quick flash of everything you horse can do, 15-30 second segments are a great tactic to use to be able to fit it all in!

alliekat
Nov. 22, 2011, 07:52 AM
Thanks, those things help.

Because I am advertising her as having dressage training, would it make sense to put the hunter flat work and the dressage "frame" flatwork on the same video before the jumping or should all the dressage work be separate?

Does the idea of dressage turn off the average hunter or does it help that they know they are very broke on the flat?

NJR

If you are really gearing her toward the hunter market I would keep the video to what they are looking for. If she is solid TL then she shouldn't be packaged up in a frame anyway. I want to see a horse that is working over her back and seeking contact to the bit, not unnecessarily "OTB" If you want to show case her dressage training, I would do it in a separate video. The video showing what Hunter riders want to see will already be long enough. Good luck. Sounds like a nice mare :) I love them with a solid dressage foundation myself :D