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View Full Version : Advice needed (long). Happy update, last post!



GingerJumper
Nov. 20, 2011, 12:34 PM
As a few of you (although probably not too many) on here know, as well as any who read my pitiful blog, my horse is laid up for the next 6mos-1yr. In the meantime, I do have one horse to train for the next month or two, but he's supersuper green and I'm really just finishing him off for his new owners.

Obviously, I'm pretty upset about my guy being out for that time period. He was coming along so well and I was really looking forward to the season ahead on him, so this is a bit of a blow. My main concern is his full recovery, but a secondary concern is my riding.

I've got a few horses I've got permission to ride/do whatever with, but none are really suitable for what I was prepping for with my boy, which was mainly the eq. We've considered trying to find a free lease (can't really swing a paid lease) and have found some really nice horses up for free lease that would probably do the job well, but affording a second horse on top of my boy's extra care until he's recovered would make it pretty tight.

I've looked at some working student positions, and I'm too young for most but a few would have potential as I meet the criteria in their want ads (haven't made contact with them yet).

So really, I'm in a bit of a predicament. As great as it would be to get a lease on something and get some more miles without having to worry so much about training the horse under me, I really don't feel right asking my family to throw more money at another horse, who could end up hurt or something as well. I've thought about using the others open to me, and that looks like the most likely option right now, although I'd probably have to change my show plans again. The working student positions are still something to look into, but I've never done a live-in working student position before so it'd be a whole new world for me, and I'd have to wait until school gets out, because that's really top priority in the scheme of things.

There is technically a fourth possibility of me just sucking it up and waiting until he heals with a few lessons scattered throughout that time period, but that's really not my favorite option. From how I'm looking at it now, I don't think it'd be the best use of some of my remaining time in the juniors, and I'd love to be a better rider with more miles when he comes back to work than I was when he went out of work.

Any advice anyone would like to offer would certainly not fall on deaf ears; I'm open to hearing any and all ideas or suggestions I might be missing or looking at the wrong way.

Thanks in advance :)

ETA: Parents and I are on the same page on this after numerous discussions about it. The options I mentioned above are the result of those discussions, but we know there are probably other ways of looking at it/more options out there that we're either missing or haven't considered yet. :)

ktm2007
Nov. 20, 2011, 12:44 PM
How old are you? Assuming that you still have a few years left in the junior ring, maybe you could put the money aside that you were planning on using to show this season, and save it for next. I don't know what your goals are in the eq ring, but if you saved that money from this year you may be able to hit it a little harder the following? This of course is assuming that your horse is thought to be able to come back to his regular job after recovery. If you did this, you could continue to ride the horses that are available to you so you stay in the saddle.

Another option is to talk to your parents about it. Fill them in on your goals, tell them your concerns about basically loosing a year if you were just to lesson on the horses available. See what they say about a lease.

I don't know what kind of care your horse is requiring at the moment, but is it possible to find another place to board him while he recovers that may be a bit cheaper? This would be a good option if the lease situation is a possibility, but may potentially strap your parents.

I think you really should sit down with your parents and see what options you may have. I totally understand feeling like you are loosing precious time- but sometimes it is out of our hands and we just have to do the best that we can with what is available.

good luck

GingerJumper
Nov. 20, 2011, 12:58 PM
How old are you? Assuming that you still have a few years left in the junior ring, maybe you could put the money aside that you were planning on using to show this season, and save it for next. I don't know what your goals are in the eq ring, but if you saved that money from this year you may be able to hit it a little harder the following? This of course is assuming that your horse is thought to be able to come back to his regular job after recovery. If you did this, you could continue to ride the horses that are available to you so you stay in the saddle.

Another option is to talk to your parents about it. Fill them in on your goals, tell them your concerns about basically loosing a year if you were just to lesson on the horses available. See what they say about a lease.

I don't know what kind of care your horse is requiring at the moment, but is it possible to find another place to board him while he recovers that may be a bit cheaper? This would be a good option if the lease situation is a possibility, but may potentially strap your parents.

I think you really should sit down with your parents and see what options you may have. I totally understand feeling like you are loosing precious time- but sometimes it is out of our hands and we just have to do the best that we can with what is available.

good luck

Thanks for the ideas! I did forget to mention in my OP that my parents and I have had a series of long discussions about this, and basically the options I stated have been our only ideas to date.

alto
Nov. 20, 2011, 01:01 PM
As a few of you (although probably not too many) on here know, as well as any who read my pitiful blog, my horse is laid up for the next 6mos-1yr.

I'd love to be a better rider with more miles when he comes back to work than


Jingles for Moose's recovery :yes:
- talk to your vet etc about what you can do to encourage the 6 month recovery rather than the 12 mo version (alternate therapies, rehab exercises etc).

Take the money you would've spent on showing & use it for lessons/partial leases on horses that will let you work on yourself rather than the horse.

:)

MHM
Nov. 20, 2011, 01:38 PM
I've got a few horses I've got permission to ride/do whatever with, but none are really suitable for what I was prepping for with my boy, which was mainly the eq.... I'd love to be a better rider with more miles when he comes back to work than I was when he went out of work.

In my opinion, one of the best ways to become a better rider is to ride as many different horses as possible. The more, the better.

So if you already have access to some different horses that you can ride, you can work on your own skills that way. In what way are those horses not suitable? If they're all trail horses or Western pleasure horses, that might not be as helpful to you, but if they are horses you can ride and jump safely, it will still help you improve.

If you set a course of low jumps, or even rails on the ground, you can practice position, pace, turns, smoothness- all the things that count in equitation. Hours in the saddle matter, even if they're not in the show ring.

It stinks when your horse is out of commission, especially for a long time, but it's part of being around horses. I hope he makes a full and speedy recovery. Good luck!

Mukluk
Nov. 20, 2011, 01:56 PM
I agree with the ride as many horses as you can- seems to me that there are plenty of folks out there who have horses but limited time to ride. Have you talked to local trainers/horse people? Also can you work as a catch rider?- that might be a way to keep showing (assuming juniors are allowed to do that). Jingles to your horse. It's tough when they are "out of commission." Be glad for what you have: a nice horse, supportive parents, and the opportunity to ride and show horses. I would have loved to have had your opportunities as a young person!!!!!!

Mukluk
Nov. 20, 2011, 02:03 PM
It's raining out! And we don't have an indoor! What I am really interested in are good waterproof riding rain pants. Last year I wore my Goretex North Face Mountain light ski pants. Actually worked well but they are too short for riding so it looked kind of dorky. I would love it if someone made a full side zip, waterproof, shell pant that I could use- full side zips make them super easy on and off. I want something I can throw on over my regular riding pants. Any riding specific ones that you like? Anyone use waterproof pants from other sports like motorcycling? Thanks in advance for any wisdom on the topic.

TheHorseProblem
Nov. 20, 2011, 05:38 PM
It's raining out! And we don't have an indoor! What I am really interested in are good waterproof riding rain pants. Last year I wore my Goretex North Face Mountain light ski pants. Actually worked well but they are too short for riding so it looked kind of dorky. I would love it if someone made a full side zip, waterproof, shell pant that I could use- full side zips make them super easy on and off. I want something I can throw on over my regular riding pants. Any riding specific ones that you like? Anyone use waterproof pants from other sports like motorcycling? Thanks in advance for any wisdom on the topic.

New thread fail!:)

I live in CA and I can't believe anyone would ride in the rain anyway. That is weather!!!:lol:

But back to the OP, What is the rush to compete as a junior? Is the competition any easier? From what I have seen at the shows, there are more parents buying really competitive horses for their teenagers, than there are A/O riders.

CVPeg
Nov. 20, 2011, 06:03 PM
Agree about trying to find opportunities to ride more horses.

When I was a young adult and decided it was time to sell my horse, a Junior in the barn was right in the middle of trying to qualify for the Medal/Maclay. I rode only amateur eq and adult hunter. Her horse became lame. As encouraged by our trainer, she gave mine a try, and although we didn't all think of him in this light, he rose to the occasion. Helped me find him a good home as she campaigned him, and she was able to keep going.

You can't always plan these situations, and you may find a few short term possibilities. But if you keep your ear to the ground, you never know what might come up. Plus, the exposure to all kinds of horses, requiring all kinds of adaptation on the part of the rider, will give you invaluable experience.

Angelico
Nov. 20, 2011, 07:05 PM
Well I have nothing helpful to say, but I do want to say I'm sorry to hear about this and I'm really impressed by how mature and rational you are about everything. Half the juniors I know would be throwing a fit and running away from home (not knocking age, just saying). Keep your chin up and be patient, it is amazing what oppurtunities can fall into your lap sometimes! Good luck!

:D :D :D

GingerJumper
Nov. 20, 2011, 09:13 PM
Thank you so much everyone!

There is a possibility of a lease in my future on a super cool BTDT kinda mare at my barn... not really what I was looking for but she'd still be great for miles. Who knows :) Sometimes things that didn't seem like they'd work turn out to be just what was needed... fingers crossed it works out, she's really a blast to ride.

GingerJumper
Nov. 20, 2011, 09:19 PM
New thread fail!:)

I live in CA and I can't believe anyone would ride in the rain anyway. That is weather!!!:lol:

But back to the OP, What is the rush to compete as a junior? Is the competition any easier? From what I have seen at the shows, there are more parents buying really competitive horses for their teenagers, than there are A/O riders.

Honestly, I'm not quite sure. I suppose a part of it would be exposure as a junior, and more flexibility in what classes I'm eligible for. That's how I've always thought of it anyways.

Trixie
Nov. 20, 2011, 10:01 PM
OP, what part of Zone 3 are you in? Feel free to PM me if you want.


So if you already have access to some different horses that you can ride, you can work on your own skills that way. In what way are those horses not suitable? If they're all trail horses or Western pleasure horses, that might not be as helpful to you, but if they are horses you can ride and jump safely, it will still help you improve.

If you set a course of low jumps, or even rails on the ground, you can practice position, pace, turns, smoothness- all the things that count in equitation. Hours in the saddle matter, even if they're not in the show ring.

I agree with this advice also - ride anything and everything that you can. If it can go w-t-c and do X's, you can spend a lot of time working on exercises without stirrups to become more solid and improve your eye. A lot of eq is solid basics, basics, basics and fine tuning on top of that.

I would also ask your trainer if she knows anyone who has anything that needs catch rides, and take as many lessons and clinics as you can.

I spent my junior years riding anything and everything offered, especially in high school. I rode several rather interesting horses (including one who had four totally different legs that seemed to go in four totally different directions), but it gave me a much better foundation over the long run.

candysgirl
Nov. 21, 2011, 01:33 AM
I'd ask around. I bet there are people out there trying to sell horses that would be open to a competent junior putting show miles on them.

I grew up riding saddleseat. I didn't have a horse of my own (at least until I bought a polo pony in college...), but I got tossed on all kinds of horses because I was a strong rider and the price of the horse jumped considerably if it could be considered a kid's horse. I had a blast and learned to stick to just about anything.

KateKat
Nov. 21, 2011, 01:44 PM
awww what happened to your boy? Jingles for a speedy recovery.

My horse has been out of commission for the past few weeks and it has been a very eye opening experience to ride other horses (my trainer and other people at the barn have been graciously letting me borrow rides). After riding strictly my horse for a year I have some interesting habits, lol. So I'm with the group that this might be the best thing for your riding and you will definitely come back to your boy with a much better understanding!

jay0087
Nov. 21, 2011, 04:26 PM
Depending on where you live, we have a few options at our barn that are good equ horses and could use some ride time.

GingerJumper
Nov. 21, 2011, 07:05 PM
Thanks for all the replies! PMs are being sent to those who asked about location :)

GingerJumper
Nov. 23, 2011, 10:36 AM
Well, here's the happy update!

Well, it looks like I have a lease situation worked out on an AWESOME packer-y mare! Her owner has VERY generously offered me the use of the mare for however long I'd like, no strings attached. She didn't even want me to pay the mare's expenses, although we are going to try to get her to let us pay for upkeep and whatnot, since I'm the one using her.

She's an 11yo imported Hanoverian mare who was imported as a dressage horse, trained to 3rd level, then was purchased by my BO on the west coast and shown in all three rings and did 4' at one point. She's had a while off due to lack of time since coming over to the east coast, but I've been bringing her back into work for a while now just for a break from the greenies. She's very fun and totally honest to the fences. She's got a big, back-cracking jump and hates to touch the rails.

In addition to wondermare, the new owners of a horse I've worked with along with my boss for several months are paying me to finish him until they move him to their property when their barn is built. He's a good soul who's been through a lot and I am so excited to remain a part of his progress. They will also be lessoning on him with my boss/trainer so we're both a part of the process.

I've also been riding my boss/trainer's mare some, as well as wondermare's owner's other horse, a super fun pony jumper, and exercising some small ponies for an old trainer, so I've been sitting on a lot lately!

Greatest thanks to everyone who messaged me with suggestions or offers of horses to hack; I hugely appreciate it.

BAC
Nov. 23, 2011, 10:41 AM
Wonderful news, I am glad you have so many rides to keep you busy while your guy recuperates. Have fun.