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View Full Version : Standlee Alfalfa Products



rcloisonne
Nov. 18, 2011, 12:04 PM
I recently found some very nice, if dusty, bagged alfalfa hay produced by Standlee at Tractor Supply. The price is a bit high (~ $18/50#) but my on the thin side TB loves it so what the hay. ;)

I was just curious, however, about why the Standlee alfalfa cubes (same weight, 50#) are only $13.95? Isn't making cubes an extra step? Any ideas from the hay experts?

I prefer to feed the hay to reduce choke risk but beside the higher cost it is oddly dusty (a significant amount of white dust that doesn't smell or look moldy) and I have to wet it down. The hay is very dry! I don't have a lot of experience with alfalfa hay as local stuff is hard to find and it tends to be either moldy or really stemmy. Other than the dust, the Standlee alfalfa looks to be very high quality.

ponysize
Nov. 18, 2011, 12:41 PM
I find that pricing to run fairly normal. Triple Crown chopped Alfalfa forage in a 50lb bag runs $18 and change. The cubes are $13-15.

The only standlee products i have any experience with is their compressed bales.

JSwan
Nov. 18, 2011, 12:48 PM
I think that stuff has cocaine or heroin in it or something.

I know a horse that is addicted to it. Won't eat any other brand. When I say addicted, I really mean it. Loves the stuff.

There is a version with oats that is a little cheaper - I can't remember if it's just hulls or whole oats. Anyway - the horse eats that like it's going out of style.

That's all I can add.

Marla 100
Nov. 18, 2011, 01:37 PM
I just picked up several 40# bags of Standlee Alfalfa Pellets AT $11.99/bag which is way better than the prices for baled alfalfa here. Horses love their T&A and straight timothy pellets also.
My hay guy told me come January, hay is going to be very hard to get. Guess I need to stock up now.

KnKShowmom
Nov. 18, 2011, 01:47 PM
We use the cubes - around $13 per bag. Soak it with lots of hot water and it breaks down nicely and they LOVE it.

This time of year we feed it at night check and it gives them something warm to work on for a while.

ReSomething
Nov. 18, 2011, 03:13 PM
We don't have a bagged loose product, just the compressed bales and assorted types of cubes. All very popular. I have no clue what the dust would be except mold. Perhaps pollen or field dust? (I know, what a stretch!)

stryder
Nov. 18, 2011, 03:40 PM
I bought some Standlee cubes last week or so. The bags here are 40 lbs. So at your price they're running about 35 cents a pound. The hay, if it's 50-lb. bags, is about 36 cents/lb. Maybe because the cubes are more compressed, there is less volume to ship, which has affected the price?

All I know is that the cubes are very high quality and my mare eats them.

JumpinBeans81
Nov. 18, 2011, 04:26 PM
I'm also using the Standlee products...my horse LOVES them!!! The quality is soooo CONSISTANT! Someone asked about the alfalfa/oat cubes...it's oat hay, fairly popular on the west coast. Here in georgetown, KY the A/O cubes are $10.49 (40 lb bag) and I've also been using the straight Alfalfa cubes $13.49/50 lb bag. I pour hot water over them and let the cubes break apart/soak for a little bit and then feed it to him warm...LOVES it.

Only thing about the pellets...if you're feeding them to replace hay, it isn't considered a long-stem fiber...cubes and beet pulp are, so those products might be better in that application??

http://www.understanding-horse-nutrition.com/alfalfa-pellets.html

SAcres
Nov. 18, 2011, 08:43 PM
I just got a bale of compressed alfalfa at TSC today. I found it to be dusty too, but it seemed like some of the hay had broken down into "hay dust" more than anything.

It was my first experience with a compressed bale, I pulled a flake of hay apart and shook it out, then gave it to my gelding. He was a happy boy and seemed to really like it. :)

I've also used Standlee alfalfa pellets and cubes. I prefer the pellets and it seems like my horses to too. They turn into more of a mush than the cubes (which I don't like) but they take way less time to soak, are easier to scoop out, and the horses like them more.

ETA: the bale I got was ~ $18 a bale too.

Overall I love Standlee products...very high quality.

Loves to ride
Nov. 18, 2011, 10:56 PM
Timely thread..

I was about to post a question asking about Standlee products..

I have an older 29+ horse that can only pick at hay and will not touch Dengie, Lucerne Farm, Triple Crown nor any other chopped forage product so I was going to try the Standlee line and I'm happy to hear the positive feedback.

RedMare01
Nov. 18, 2011, 10:58 PM
I very much like the Standlee products. I buy the alfalfa pellets from TSC. Last week I paid $12ish for a bag. I find the qulality to be much better than the generic feed store brands, which IME are dusty and crumble easily.

Petstorejunkie
Nov. 18, 2011, 11:47 PM
Standlee is an awesome company. consistent product, and great staff on call.
I've been using their compressed alf for about 5 years now with great success
I've just started with their alf cubes and beep

dalpal
Nov. 19, 2011, 08:01 AM
I recently found some very nice, if dusty, bagged alfalfa hay produced by Standlee at Tractor Supply. The price is a bit high (~ $18/50#) but my on the thin side TB loves it so what the hay. ;)

I was just curious, however, about why the Standlee alfalfa cubes (same weight, 50#) are only $13.95? Isn't making cubes an extra step? Any ideas from the hay experts?

I prefer to feed the hay to reduce choke risk but beside the higher cost it is oddly dusty (a significant amount of white dust that doesn't smell or look moldy) and I have to wet it down. The hay is very dry! I don't have a lot of experience with alfalfa hay as local stuff is hard to find and it tends to be either moldy or really stemmy. Other than the dust, the Standlee alfalfa looks to be very high quality.

I fed the outrageously priced Standlee hay until I found a local source...double the size, nice quality alfalfa hay about 65 pound bales...9.95 per bale. If you want to feed the hay, I would look for a different source. The cubes were 9.95 at TSC last year, now they're 14.00 per bag. IMO, if you can get the actual hay, it's a better deal.

PNW AMTS Dealer
Nov. 19, 2011, 08:54 AM
I love the Standlee alfalfa pellets and so do my horses. When I open the bag it smells like I'm standing in a fresh cut hay field, good enough for me to eat :D They are much more consistent quality than any others I have tried. I also fed their alfalfa cubes so I could use them on our camping trip where certified weed free had to be fed. They are good quality, but what a PITA to soak, and I was to nervous the horses would choke if fed dry.

Mrs.ChickenBritches
Nov. 19, 2011, 10:05 AM
I have been feeding the compressed timothy hay and my horses eat every bite. It is a little more expensive but the quality has been way better than the other timothies in my area. Some of the bales have been dusty but it smells and looks like field dust. So far no rocks, dirt clumps, or animal parts.:)

PRS
Nov. 19, 2011, 10:12 AM
I've used the Standlee products too and my horse loves them. I have a 28 year old mare that can no longer chew hay. She gets a bucket of Alfalfa/Timothy cubes and beet pulp pellets soaked with plenty of warm water twice a day in addition to her Senior feed and Alfalfa pellets. She has actually GAINED weight on this diet. Last year I used their beet pulp shreds but she didn't seem to like them as much as the pellets. I've not used any of their compressed hay products since she can't eat hay anyhow.

ReSomething
Nov. 19, 2011, 03:38 PM
I fed the outrageously priced Standlee hay until I found a local source...double the size, nice quality alfalfa hay about 65 pound bales...9.95 per bale. If you want to feed the hay, I would look for a different source. The cubes were 9.95 at TSC last year, now they're 14.00 per bag. IMO, if you can get the actual hay, it's a better deal.

I haven't found KY alfalfa that matches good West Coast/Rocky Mtn alfalfa. What we have bought bears very little resemblance to what I grew up with and there is always the danger of those beetles - can't remember what they are called - that infest alfalfa in the Eastern part of the country. You are correct about the cost but getting the hay is a lot harder than getting the cubes.