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Piadosa
Nov. 16, 2011, 05:56 PM
I have found a great potential half-leasee for my mare, who couldn't have come along at a better time because Im short on time and money right now.

I have never leased out a horse before, and I want the best experience possible for myself, my leasee, and my horse. I have a contract that I got from this forum that I like, and we have decided on payment, basic ground rules, and stuff like use of my tack.

Anything else I should now before my potential lease starts? I would love to know what has made other peoples leases successful.

Thanks!

STA
Nov. 16, 2011, 06:17 PM
EVERYTHING in writing!!!!

mvp
Nov. 16, 2011, 06:50 PM
Anything else I should now before my potential lease starts? I would love to know what has made other peoples leases successful.

Thanks!

Yes, all in writing, covering every "what if" you can think of.

Talk about that agreement, too. If your lessee has not owned a horse yet or paid 100% of the bills for one, you have a bit of gentle education to do. The sticker shock may come into play. Be fair in your pricing, be informative about how and why you arrived at the lease fee/terms you did.

I like to read my lease with a lessee in person. That gives the lessee a chance to ask questions about each clause (either, "why is this here"? or "can we modify this one"?). The lease is the starting point for an agreement that will be carried out in real time and in a situation that will vary. It doesn't guarantee action. You never want to actually use the lease as a legal instrument. So the point of this conversation is to give both sides a chance to come to a mutual understanding and agreement about what they will do in the future.

Last, and most important, you need to get two things straight in your head.

1) What you want vs. what you need. What things can you afford to compromise on or overlook? What things are deal-breakers? Be sure to breathe and assume that your lessee is doing the best she knows how for your mare, your equipment and your relationship with your barn.

2) You are involved in customer service. You need to be polite and professional no. matter. what. If you find that you cannot behave well-- for any reason-- end the lease following the specified procedure for doing that.

TrakeGirl
Nov. 16, 2011, 06:57 PM
What kind of program are you in? If you take lessons/ride with a trainer, will the leasee be doing that as well?