PDA

View Full Version : Do you give your horses hay while trailering?



Carolinadreamin'
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:25 AM
Hi. When your horses are being hauled, do you let them eat hay? I know some people do and some don't. Please tell me what you do and why.

Thanks!

AliCat518
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:28 AM
Yep. Keeps them happy and busy.

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:34 AM
Nope. No need to. I trailer for less than two hours, one way. I'll give them hay, after hunting, if I plan to stay a while for a breakfast or extended tailgate.

I prefer to keep the cargo area free of potential hazards and debris. Just my preference.

saddleup
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:37 AM
Yes.

Bogie
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:38 AM
Yes. My horse was a very anxious traveler when I got him. Hay helps him stay calm.

shiningwizard255
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:38 AM
We do. Keeps them occupied.

Auventera Two
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:41 AM
Yes always. I trailer out to ride a lot and my trips range from 30 minutes to 8 hours. They don't always eat in the trailer, but at least they have the option.

I think it's important to have trailer ties that are a little bit longer so they can get their head down below wither level to clear the dust out of their nose if they need to. I have a big slant load, so this is possible. Straight loads with mangers might be impossible for horses to get heads down, I don't know.

tabula rashah
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:41 AM
Depends- If I'm going 15 minutes down the road- then I don't usually worry about it. Anything else- then, yes, they always have hay. Properly hung there is no reason for it to cause a problem. Sometimes I'm hauling 12-15 hours so I can't imagine them not having something available for that amount of time!

Carolinadreamin'
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:44 AM
Thanks, that was quick! Do you have a preference for a certain brand/type of hay net? We have a Busy Snacker for the time when one of our horse's was on stall rest. Our other horse (for whom I'm asking this question) has never used it or taken to it.

ChocoMare
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:44 AM
Always, regardless of distance. Let's 'em do something that keeps 'em occupied :D

katarine
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:48 AM
I have small hole hay nets and a slant load w/o mangers. I had a horse manage to paw a normal hay net yrs ago and get hung in it (yes it was hung full and high and and and). So a small hole, or a hay bag, is my preference. I hang it intertwined with the window bars, and against the slant wall to their left...if you can visualize that, so the horse can stand straight and snooze or sneeze, or nip a bite of hay from just beside their face. I haul often enough (about once a week most of the year) that there's pretty much always hay in there. If it gets old it gets chunked, of course.

Gloria
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:54 AM
Yes, always, unless it is less than 30 minutes drive. Don't want to increase the risk of colic or ulcer any more than necessary.

Also we don't use any hay nets. Instead, we use hay bags. After seeing horses got hung up and cut themselves horrid by hay nets, I banished them from my barn.

Gavi
Nov. 16, 2011, 09:54 AM
I was traveling Thanksgiving weekend and had a horse choke on hay in the trailer. I was taken in by a lovely family, and my vet drove 100 miles to come treat the horse. My vet and I were treated to a wonderful Thanksgiving meal and true southern hospitality. We spent a great weekend with our hosts and even went quail hunting with them. Horse people are just the best!

Jealoushe
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:08 AM
I alwasy do, I use a large cotton haynet, fits almost a whole bale. I usually am spending a few hours wherever I am going so the hay net goes with the horse into the stall :)

marta
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:11 AM
i do, but does she eat it - no, not until we stop.
but i figured it's there if she wants it. makes me feel good. that's probably the only valid reason i can offer ;)
i use a cotton/poly lined bag. hangs in the corner of my stock type horse trailer. she hauls loose so at least theoretically she could eat out of the bag and clean up whatever falls on the floor, but as i said before, she doesn't until we get to our destination.

AppendixQHLover
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:13 AM
Yes it keeps them occupied and quiet.

KitKat987
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:17 AM
Most places I go are under 20 minutes, so I don't bother. The odd trip that is over an hour I will. But when they are hanging in the trailer at a show or something I always give them hay.

tabula rashah
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:52 AM
Thanks, that was quick! Do you have a preference for a certain brand/type of hay net? We have a Busy Snacker for the time when one of our horse's was on stall rest. Our other horse (for whom I'm asking this question) has never used it or taken to it.

I like the small hole hay nets- I got mine at Dover on sale for like $9.99/ each. I have used hay bags but they are easily destroyed IMHO, even they heavy duty ones. If I have a horse loose in a box stall, then I do hay on the floor.

wildlifer
Nov. 16, 2011, 11:17 AM
Yes. I use small hole hay nets. I used to use hay bags, but they'd just throw it all on the floor.

pj
Nov. 16, 2011, 11:26 AM
Yes, always, unless it is less than 30 minutes drive. Don't want to increase the risk of colic or ulcer any more than necessary.

Also we don't use any hay nets. Instead, we use hay bags. After seeing horses got hung up and cut themselves horrid by hay nets, I banished them from my barn.
We always have hay in the trailer when hauling and feel hay bags safer, too.

Shermy
Nov. 16, 2011, 11:36 AM
Yep, haybag, then once we get where ever we are going, I hang the it in front of him. That way, he can eat while I tack up and untack. If riding w/people, we usually hang around a bit after the ride, so it keeps him happy.

In good weather, I usually haul out to trail ride often, so I just keep the bags full, so there is always hay.

Somedays, the totally eat it while in the trailer, others, they just pick at it. At least they have the option :)

spinandslide
Nov. 16, 2011, 11:57 AM
short trips..like less then two hours..not normally.

anything longer..yes, I do. My uncle hauled horses cross country most of life. He always kept hay in front of them..kept their gut working and moving.

fordtraktor
Nov. 16, 2011, 12:11 PM
Yes, always. No nets to get a foot stuck in, though. I have manger bags in my straight load, the canvas ones. I put the hay in those. When I had a slant, I threw the hay in the floor and left them untied to eat, which I think is healthier.

I would use a NibbleNet/Freedom Feeder type in the trailer with no concerns but they may have a hard time getting the hay out and I doubt mine would bother. The two older prima donna TBs, while good haulers, would probably rather fret. Mine are barely interested enough in hay to eat at all, much less work at it, when hauling.

The yearling would likely fall asleep with his head in a pile of food. Quarter horses!

SuperSTB
Nov. 16, 2011, 12:16 PM
Most times- Yes. But there are occasions where I don't.

My own horses- everytime. Keeps them relaxed and happy.

I do haul a lot of rescues though. It depends on the situation whether or not I provide hay. Some are just racks of bones or borderline dehydrated so in those cases I do not hay, just offer water.

Edited to add: I have hay managers- no nets.

rmh_rider
Nov. 16, 2011, 12:17 PM
I have hay in the trailer at all times for them to eat. Even if they are learning to load in the trailer and are in the trailer 2 seconds, there will be hay in the trailer for them to eat.

Regardless of how long, or how far they may travel in the trailer they will have hay. I also give other horses who go in my trailer for a ride hay. Either my hay or the owners hay, owners choice. I also put alot of hay in there just in case they eat it all there will be more for them to eat to keep them busy.

An eating horse is a happy horse. I want my horses to go in the trailer all the time.

Carolinadreamin'
Nov. 16, 2011, 01:15 PM
Thank you so much for all your replies!

Bacardi1
Nov. 16, 2011, 01:19 PM
Yes - as others have already stated, it keeps them occupied & quiet. I use the regular old-fashioned cotten-rope haynets..

Mtn trails
Nov. 16, 2011, 02:39 PM
It depends. If i'm hauling in my 2 horse straight, then yes, usually. If I'm hauling in my gooseneck, then no.

cutter99
Nov. 16, 2011, 02:47 PM
Always! I wouldn't want to be left sitting somewhere without something to entertain them with. It keeps them busy if nothing else.

Big_Grey_hunter
Nov. 16, 2011, 02:53 PM
I don't haul my own horse, but both the trainers I've ridden with give the horses hay (mangers in straight load and slant, hay nets in head to head). The only exception is my dad's horse, who has a special talent at getting his feet stuck in manger and hay nets.

Guilherme
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:02 PM
For most trips, yes. We use hay bags vice nets.

G.

atr
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:06 PM
Yes, always a hay bag, keeps them occupied and gives that gut acid sloshing around something of a buffer.

jump4me
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:06 PM
I do, unless going somewhere with a tranq'd horse. Depending on thetrailer, either a small hay net, a hay "bag"/basket thing(that clips to the front bar and wall of the trailer, at chest height), or just loose on the floor if the horse is being hauled loose.

JenEM
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:07 PM
Yes, always. No nets to get a foot stuck in, though. I have manger bags in my straight load, the canvas ones. I put the hay in those.

I have the same type in my straight load, and really like them. Much less messy than nets, and low enough that the horses can put their heads down without problems. The only time I've ever trailered without hay is when the horse was being hauled to the vet clinic for a colic. Otherwise, I always put something in. Except for veterinary situations like I mentioned, I don't think I've ever seen someone trailer without hay.

Somermist
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:17 PM
Yes, always.

Liberty
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:22 PM
Yes. Always, no matter how short the trip (plus the fact that a short trip can turn into a longer one if a tire goes flat, breakdown, etc.).

One time we had a tire blowout alongside a 2-lane 55-mph road heavily travelled by 18-wheelers. Naturally, the flat was on the traffic side of the trailer, and even though we managed to limp along the narrow shoulder to a wider part, it was still very unnerving to change that tire with big trucks roaring by just a few feet away. However, the horses didn't mind a bit; they were happily and quietly munching away on their hay.

I use small-hole haynets, and my horses always wear flymasks as well.

Tee
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:50 PM
Yes - keeps 'em out of trouble.

Sandy M
Nov. 16, 2011, 03:52 PM
Thanks, that was quick! Do you have a preference for a certain brand/type of hay net? We have a Busy Snacker for the time when one of our horse's was on stall rest. Our other horse (for whom I'm asking this question) has never used it or taken to it.

I have a slant load and use a hanging nylon corner manger. Easier than a hay net or hay bag and they don't have to twist their necks. If you have a straightload with a manger, then all you do is stick the hay there. I have seen straight loads with no manger, but then you can hang the hay back in front of them (not "sideways" as in a slant), and they can easily pull hay out.

kookicat
Nov. 16, 2011, 04:49 PM
Yep, they get hay. I use small hole nets and soak the hay before hanging it.

katarine
Nov. 16, 2011, 04:53 PM
You'll have to figure out what works for you. My mare is 7 miles long and has dumped many a mesh or nylon corner hay manger out on her head b/c she wanted to blow her nose and forgot to accommodate the manger ;), hence my move to the hay bags or nets hung to the side.My horses are not usually tied in the trailer, so if they drop some or want to gnaw on the neighbor's knees, they can :)

TrotTrotPumpkn
Nov. 16, 2011, 04:54 PM
Re mangers: When in a straight load with a manger I still tie a bag (I find mangers basically worthless, except for storage). Nothing pisses off a food-motivated piggy more than when they pull the hay out of the manger to take a big bite, and then the rest falls to the ground (which they can't reach due to being tied). YMMV.

enjoytheride
Nov. 16, 2011, 05:01 PM
Yes, even for trips as short as 45 minutes. They snarf hay the entire way there and back. Pigs.

JeanM
Nov. 16, 2011, 06:40 PM
Yes, always a hay bag, keeps them occupied and gives that gut acid sloshing around something of a buffer.

Yup. ULCERS!! give the horse something to help with the stress and movement. Why the heck not?!

Arelle
Nov. 16, 2011, 08:30 PM
Nope. I typically don't, simply because I don't like feeding my horses without having an ample supply of water. If it's a long haul, I stop every few hours and offer hay and water. When we get where we're going, they get hay and water immediately.

crosscreeksh
Nov. 16, 2011, 10:35 PM
Always, never had a problem.

shakeytails
Nov. 17, 2011, 12:54 AM
Almost always, just to keep them busy. I usually don't if it's just a half hour trip, or if it's a youngster hauling loose. I'm afraid of the possibility of a very inexperienced hauler doing something stupid to get caught in a hay bag or net.

quietann
Nov. 17, 2011, 01:49 AM
Always. Am using a hay net right now that isn't good and thanks for the reminder to get one with small holes! Not only will that slow the piggy mare down, maybe it will keep her from dropping so much hay on the floor. (Her normal way of eating hay is to pull a huge wad out, drop most of it on the floor, and then stick her head down to eat it... can't do that while tied in a trailer.) I do pick up the hay she drops and put it back in the hay net...

My trailer has the big canvas clip-on mangers but most horses can't reach them while tied. If they are just hanging out in the trailer at a show, I'll put the mangers in and leave them untied (but supervised, of course.)

Carolinadreamin'
Nov. 17, 2011, 09:20 AM
For those who use hay bags, would you recommend something like this? http://www.sstack.com/stable_barn-supplies_hay-bags/dura-tech-extra-large-hay-saver-bag/

Gloria
Nov. 17, 2011, 09:42 AM
The only problem with this Dura-Tech bag is it might get ripped apart rather quickly - I know my horses would rip it apart in a matter of one trip.... sigh

naturalequus
Nov. 17, 2011, 02:05 PM
I used to then, for whatever reason, stopped. I think I underestimated the benefits though; I started feeding in the trailer again as of late (even for short 20min hauls) and the difference has been noticeable - my anxiety-prone OTTB is much quieter and happier. Kicking myself for ever stopping! It also has its health benefits by keeping the gut moving, in addition to the emotional benefits.

eclipse
Nov. 17, 2011, 02:40 PM
Yes our horses get hay on all trailer rides longer than 1/2 hr. We also offer water breaks (on long hauls), but are finding that most aren't really interested in drinking it, but it's still offered. And we use the canvas hay bags.

When we do the 12hr to Manitoba or BC (the longest we will trailer in one go), they'll get more hay along the way as well. They all come off bright eyed and eager to get started (although we are bedraggled by then)! :lol:

trubandloki
Nov. 17, 2011, 02:41 PM
Usually yes.
If the ride is very short then I do not bother necessarily.

I use a small hole hay bag.

crazyhorses
Nov. 17, 2011, 04:23 PM
Always do! I had a nervous trailer-er and the hay kept her a little more occupied.

gottagrey
Nov. 17, 2011, 04:47 PM
Depends on the distance - and trailer & # of horses in trailer. W/ a head to head or we had a 3 horse no hay if it was a relatively short distance. She didn't like having one more thing to worry about -in case of accident etc.. none of the horses really acted up and trailered find. Longer hauls she'd sometimes give them hay & we'd stoped to water ourselves and the horses.

I tip my hat to Area II eventing association as sometimes at their annual awards meeting/dinner they would also have a variety of seminars to attend. One year they had a Trailering Safety Seminar. I'm not sure why more of these aren't offered. They had a vet do the seminar - it was very informative -and I did waiver on I'm-never-putting- my-horse-on-a-trailer-again but...

so if any of you need ideas for winter seminars - trailering safety is a good one..

CosMonster
Nov. 17, 2011, 04:47 PM
Only for longer trips, with the exception of one horse who weaves terribly if he doesn't have hay in front of him in the trailer. For short trips with him I use corner feed bags that came with the trailer (3 horse slant), or just a normal hay net tied up like I was taught in PC. I will also usually give hay the first couple of times trailering a young horse just to provide a pleasant distraction. Otherwise, if it's under 2 hours for the normal horse I typically don't do it, particularly if it is to a show or another barn or something where they'll be offloaded into a stall and fed hay right away anyway. If it's going to be like 1 hour trailer ride, then 3-4 hour ride, then 1 hour trailer ride home, all with no hay, then I'll usually provide it in the trailer.

I only use the corner bags for short trips, otherwise I use hay nets.

Lord Helpus
Nov. 17, 2011, 05:02 PM
I thought this was an odd question since it has never occurred to me NOT to give horses hay while traveling. But thinking about it, there are always 2 sides to any question.

I can see not doing it for a 10 minute run down the road, but anything longer -- it would be like not giving them hay in their stalls.

My horses always ride loose in their box stalls, and, for their eating pleasure I provide them with both a full haynet AND hay in the corner of the stall. They also have a water bucket hung in their stall since I have rarely seen a horse drink on command at a rest stop.

No, my horses are not spoiled. No, they are not! :lol::winkgrin::lol::winkgrin:

CosMonster
Nov. 17, 2011, 06:29 PM
I used to be like you Lord Helpus, but then I had two horses choke on hay in the trailer which made me rethink trailering horses with hay except on longer trips.

Granted, I don't think it is entirely logical...I've trailered 100s if not 1000s of times over the years and I have had two whole instances of choke in the trailer...and I've dealt with probably 15 chokes in my time with horses of which only two were related to trailering...and one of those horses was prone to it anyway and I knew I shouldn't have fed him...and so even my anecdotal evidence doesn't really support the idea that it's safer to trailer without hay for short distances, yet I do it. I've also seen no evidence that it is safer to trailer with hay on short trips.

I think it's kind of like the hay net vs. hay bag debate...I know of a horse who broke his leg in a hay bag, and I've been using hay nets (normal kind, no small holes or anything) since I was a kid in PC with nary a problem, yet you hear the opposite stories here and other places. I kind of think that as long as good judgment and basic safety practices are used (ie. no letting hay nets/bags hang down near the feet, not feeding an excessively freaked out horse who is prone to choke and gobbling feed, etc.) then it just comes down to personal preference.

Don't get me wrong though, I like hearing everyone's thoughts on the matter. ;) Just musing a bit...

Gloria
Nov. 17, 2011, 06:55 PM
Huh? Hay? safety? I can see there is a safety issue with hay net/bag, but how does having hay or not has anything to do with trailer safety?:confused:

CosMonster
Nov. 17, 2011, 07:17 PM
Huh? Hay? safety? I can see there is a safety issue with hay net/bag, but how does having hay or not has anything to do with trailer safety?:confused:

As I mentioned, I've had two horses choke on hay in the trailer. I've never had a horse choke on hay in a stall or pasture. I would consider increasing the chance of choke to be safety issue. In spite of my experience I don't think it does, though, hence my post. Sorry if that wasn't clear, I was a bit distracted as I wrote it. ;) I was trying (and in retrospect, failing :lol:) to make a point about the value or lack thereof of anecdotal evidence.

Gloria
Nov. 17, 2011, 08:47 PM
:lol::lol::lol: Thank you for the explanation. I was scratching head, thinking, "did I miss something completely?"

Oh I had one horse choked on hay, but in pasture, not while trailering. It was really our fault. We accidently shut him in a pasture without hay in the dead of winter for a couple of days, and when we realized it, and opened the gate for him, he gorged himself into choking.:no:

CarolinaGirl
Nov. 17, 2011, 09:34 PM
I give hay, and trust me I know when the fatso runs out... every stop you make he lets you know. I just ordered a small hole hay net from Smartpak (apparently a new and improved version of their last one) so hopefully his two flakes will last him longer lol. He can go through an entire hay bag like this: http://stores.intuitwebsites.com/hstrial-CarolinaTackT/images/hay-bag-35-1384.jpg in about 2 hours.