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myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 12:45 PM
This is not an ad..more like a lament.. I bought a pony for DD and i love the pony....she's safe, quiet, etc. Unfortunately, she's too big for DD right now and DD won't ride her (discouraged b/c she has a hard time steering etc.) DD is great on the barn's small pony.. I don't want to pay board on DD's pony any more b/c no one is riding her.

I wish there was a local person who was interested in free leasing a pony. I don't have a barn at home and really can no longer justify paying $600/mo for the pony to hang out. That being said, i LOVE this pony and think that when DD is bigger she will be able to ride her. I think I am just afraid to lease her out to someone I don't know.

Can anyone help calm my leasing fears? I want to do right by this pony b/c she is so safe and has been great for DD to work around and get some confidence back after a rocky last year.

Mayaty02
Nov. 14, 2011, 12:57 PM
obviously the solution is to lease her to me :cool:

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:00 PM
TAKE HER! PLEASE!!! :) WAIT...I mean..i'll deliver her! :)

Rel6
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:14 PM
Leasing sounds like a great choice here. Some other little girl will shower this pony with affection while DD gets her confidence back on something a little more approachable, size wise.

My question though, is why did you buy a pony a your daughter won't ride? I'm really not trying to come across as snarky, simple curious.

alto
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:31 PM
I bought a pony for DD and i love the pony....she's safe, quiet, etc. Unfortunately, she's too big for DD right now and DD won't ride her (discouraged b/c she has a hard time steering etc.) DD is great on the barn's small pony.. I don't want to pay board on DD's pony any more b/c no one is riding her.

I wish there was a local person who was interested in free leasing a pony. I don't have a barn at home and really can no longer justify paying $600/mo for the pony to hang out. That being said, i LOVE this pony and think that when DD is bigger she will be able to ride her. I think I am just afraid to lease her out to someone I don't know.


"Safest" place to lease the pony is to someone in your barn that will lesson with your trainer - write this into the lease contract.
This way you know exactly how the pony is going undersaddle & that she is sound etc.

Personally I'd just sell the pony.
Remembering issues your DD has had with this pony, the pony really needs to go into a training lease so that it will be a suitable mount for DD in the future; if this is unlikely, then go with a straight out sale to a great home.

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:34 PM
i wouldn't mind selling her. It's just that i really want her to go to a good home.. i want to do right by this pony... we are a really small barn and there's no one to lease her to within the barn...

CHSatwork
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:38 PM
My DD has long outgrown hers but alas I love that pony. I doubled the price so she won't sell:lol: Yes that is the truth. But we have our own place so it doesn't much matter. If I was paying board I guess I would have to sell as much as it would break my heart. Good luck.

janiemerle
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:42 PM
You could have the pony trained to drive. :-)

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:53 PM
rel..pony was a good deal. it was literally a 50/50 chance that DD had enough strength to ride the pony. the pony was such a good deal i couldn't pass it up...

chunky munky
Nov. 14, 2011, 01:58 PM
Purchasing a large pony for a child that is appropriate for a small is never a good idea. I have always tried to tell clients that:
a) it is like buying size 12 shoes for a child that wears an 8
b) Showing in the large pony division puts your little child in competition with 18 year olds. Not wise.
Hope it works out well, but those thinking of doing the same thing, please pay attention.

Char
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:03 PM
The pony doesn't necessarily need to be leased by someone who is already boarding at your barn. You could place a local ad and specify that the pony would have to stay in the current barn with lessee assuming all related pony-keeping costs.

That's what I'd do, anyway.

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:05 PM
Chunky munky...old trainer recommended the pony. I didn't go off half cocked. We're not talking a large pony showing in the pony division. We're talking a 13.0 hand pony SS pony who is TOO quiet. DD can canter her around with no hands. The pony is safe and was the type of pony that DD needed coming off of 2 naughty ponies last year. She just doesn't like you to touch her mouth and DD's legs are too short to steer from more from the leg.

Perhaps I should have been more specific to avoid assumptions.

Mayaty02
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:06 PM
Purchasing a large pony for a child that is appropriate for a small is never a good idea. I have always tried to tell clients that:
a) it is like buying size 12 shoes for a child that wears an 8
b) Showing in the large pony division puts your little child in competition with 18 year olds. Not wise.
Hope it works out well, but those thinking of doing the same thing, please pay attention.

It's a small medium pony we're talking about here, not a large. And in fact OP came on here when her DD could no longer safely ride the very bratty small they had at the time and we all advised her to go for a bigger pony, less "small pony attitude" :) so OP is between a rock and a hard place.

Mayaty02
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:07 PM
Chunky munky...old trainer recommended the pony. I didn't go off half cocked. We're not talking a large pony showing in the pony division. We're talking a 13.0 hand pony SS pony who is TOO quiet. DD can canter her around with no hands. The pony is safe and was the type of pony that DD needed coming off of 2 naughty ponies last year. She just doesn't like you to touch her mouth and DD's legs are too short to steer from more from the leg.

Perhaps I should have been more specific to avoid assumptions.

LOL we posted at the same time ;)

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:07 PM
:) thanks pal...

SuperAlter
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:12 PM
While I agree with the poster that stated it's not a good idea to purchase a pony DD is to little to ride, but you could be in our position in having a pony that is too small to ride for anyone aside from lead line walks.

Honest, we are unsure if thing is really even "broke", knows how to steer etc. And, we dont have anyone under 50lbs that could get on it to see.

I gave walk on him yesterday to the biggest girl that has sat on him yet ( she is 7 and 30lbs, teeny tiny little thing) but she has more leg and balance than anyone that has sat on him yet...

I told her that if he starts acting like a twit the ride was over,she got this very puzzled look, looked at the pony and said "Well,whats a twit? and how do I know when he is acting like one?" hahah needless to say he did great !!

findeight
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:17 PM
Call old trainer who recommended the pony and work with her to lease or sell.

Hate to say this but the little ones rarely grow out of hating a pony. They associate all their fear and doubt with them...and I remember your DD having a tough time with the last ones. JMHO but a sale would be best. Start over next year...or when DD actually asks for a new one- that means she is ready for one. Don't rush it, let her ride the small.

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:24 PM
Oh findeight... i am NOT buying her or leasing her anything else!!!!

She actually has a small in the barn that she lessons on and loves to ride.. there you go..she can ride that one.

I absolutely agree that they don't grow out of hating them. And she does love this pony...on the ground. The pony's great with bigger kids... Just DD is too teeny.

Yes, we had issues last year with the naughty sassy smalls... went bigger and well.. other problems. At least she is safe on this one. I literally had to yell at her to keep her hands on the reins when cantering b/c it was fun for her to drop the reins and put her hands on her head. In so doing, she had to use a lot of leg and the pony kept going around the rail. It's just not the right one. And i knew this could be the problem. But she wasn't afraid of her, so i took the chance. Old trainer retired so she won't help me out. (Long story)... New trainer actually has a few leads too, so maybe this won't be such a big deal...

poltroon
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:37 PM
I've come to the conclusion that it takes a village to raise a child and pony. Small children (and mind you I love mine) are schizophrenic and irrational and often unable to articulate their needs and fears. They benefit from a variety of ponies. Ponies, on the other hand, need to be in regular work, and benefit from a variety of riders. Sometimes there isn't a village around and so having one pony is what it needs to be, but it's just not easy, as OP has experienced.

OP, you could try advertising her for sale or lease and see what happens. I would also speak to the recommending trainer. If you can find someone who will come and lease in your barn, or perhaps in a barn that your trainer is very comfortable with, you might have a solution. But I think it would be wise to be open to selling her too, if that ends up feeling right.

Anselcat
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:43 PM
Can you do limited 'for-lease' advertising? Send targeted emails to trainers and pony moms who you (and/or your trainer) trust -- someone has a student who needs this pony!! And once you find a good fit, mention that pony just *might* be for sale.

Angelico
Nov. 14, 2011, 02:49 PM
Well I'm not a parent, so I'm sure it's a little different being in your position, but I never got to ride medium or small ponies, my trainers always had me on full size horses and the occasional large pony. Size was never an issue, and I had a huge advantage over those kids who competed on ponies all the way up until they were in their teens. When it finally came time for them to come out and play with the big crowd, I had a huge edge on them.

If the pony is a sweetheart then your daughter should have no trouble steering, she is probably just intimidated. The only way to overcome that is to get on and ride. However, who wants to put their kid on something they don't feel comfortable on? So I can understand that, I'm just saying, shielding her from size won't help her as a rider.

Leasing is a great idea, especially on a pony, but make sure to get it in the contract that the leessee (how would it be spelled?) will provide an insurance policy, but you probably know all that stuff.

Good luck!

Rel6
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:06 PM
I feel like sometimes people get so caught up in size they look at that first and then suitability. This isn't targeted at the OP, just a general statement. I've seen so many parents rule out horses and ponies just because of size before they even look at suitability.

I'm 5'1'' as an ammy, so you can imagine how tiny I was as a child. When it came time to lease my first pony to do the short stirrup with I was deciding between two. One was a 13.1h pony who was a little quick and didn't have a change but was easy to handle. The other was a been there done that 16.1 hand ottb. I absolutely fell in love with the ottb but initially my mom was resistant because he was so big for me.

Then my mom saw someone else riding the pony in a semi-private with me and the pony got quick to a crossrail, chipped, and the girl popped right off. My mom turns to look at me where the steady eddy TB is literally a metronome carting me around some small verticals. I loved that horse. Never took a single spill off of him. In fact my first fall? Off of a pony who ducked out of a vertical at a show a few years later!

In a perfect world the pony would fit the rider in both temperament and size, but when you're on a limited budget or have other constraints sometime you have to make compromises. I feel like a lot of people compromise temperament to get an animal that fits them size-wise, when I feel like it should be the other way around. (I could launch into another story about my 17.2h wb who very patiently taught me the ropes of the jumper ring, but I'll spare you all!)

alibi_18
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:08 PM
Could you 'lease' the poney to your barn's lesson program? Or 'exchange' the pony she is now riding with yours?

And when your daughter is ready, she could take over!

If this pony is as sweet as you say, I'm sure you'll find a solution.

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:09 PM
Angelico
DD is JUST 48" tall and not even 50lbs. She's teeny for her age (8). She is not intimidated by the pony. The pony just takes advantage of her b/c DD is not capable of steering more with her legs. With the bigger kids in the barn, she is fine.

REl6 - I hear you re: being small. Unfortunately right now DD is better suited for a pony...

findeight
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:23 PM
Let's not forget pipsqueak DD had a couple of bad experiences last year, including bolting and falls.

Kid has lost confidence, not unusual in an 8 year old. I'd keep her where she is confident for now. Whatever her tiny thought process is, it's ok for her not to want to ride anything bigger.

Sport
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:24 PM
If option is selling or leasing but you think this could be the right pony in a couple of years, I would lease. You know how hard it is to find a good pony. You actually have one, even if the current match isn't perfect.

I know in barn is the perfect scenario, but you or your trainer must know some other facilities in the area that you would trust the pony with.

I don't know the age of ponies, but one thing I have noticed with the good ponies is that they are a pretty tolerant bunch.

Rel6
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:26 PM
REl6 - I hear you re: being small. Unfortunately right now DD is better suited for a pony...

Totally not disagreeing, obviously you know the situation and DD. I was making a more general statement, not aimed at you :)

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:30 PM
sure.. no offense taken here! ;)

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 03:37 PM
Sport - that's kind of what i was leaning towards. I love this pony. She's a push sort of ride.. but has an auto change and never looks at anything. No spook, ever. Just way too quiet. (sometimes quiet isn't a good thing! LOL)

So I'll see about a lease (have some leads)... If my property was more suitable, I'd try to figure out a way to bring her home and turn her out. But the property is a bit mushy and isn't completely fenced or pasture suitable.

yes findeight..completely. We have small in the barn that she LOVES to ride...cantering crossrail courses and loving it. She thinks its "neat" to be able to canter from the halt. So, she's getting a good experience.... now i have to move her own pony along...and her pony brought her to this point... last January she stopped riding..and it wasn't until this pony (hers) that she felt comfortable getting on and riding. So now she has the small to ride and she's coming back to riding and is happy about it...it's all a slow progression

To the MAX
Nov. 14, 2011, 04:01 PM
Oh man, I have a little lesson rider who has to ride my 16hh OTTB in lessons...she would love something more her size! PM me if you decide to lease her off property. I'm in south central PA but I'm from central NJ and could give you plenty of references. :)

FlashGordon
Nov. 14, 2011, 04:19 PM
I've come to the conclusion that it takes a village to raise a child and pony. Small children (and mind you I love mine) are schizophrenic and irrational and often unable to articulate their needs and fears. They benefit from a variety of ponies. Ponies, on the other hand, need to be in regular work, and benefit from a variety of riders.

Ha.... I heart this.....

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 05:01 PM
Poltroon... so true....so true...

chunky munky
Nov. 14, 2011, 05:58 PM
Usually the difference betweenh 12.2 ands 13.0 H is not size, but training. Untrained is untrained, no matter what size.

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 06:06 PM
again, generalizations. And no, the pony is not untrained. She is smart and knows DD is small. She's broke, broke broke. I wish I had a pony like that when i was 8. That being said, when i was 8, i was twice DD's size.

Somermist
Nov. 14, 2011, 06:19 PM
I don't know where you are located, but could you contact some local hunter pony barns with the pony's information and tell them you are looking to lease the pony for the season. You might be surprised, pony sounds like she might be perfect for a little more advanced rider. Just a suggestion.

lcw579
Nov. 14, 2011, 06:28 PM
Could you 'lease' the poney to your barn's lesson program? Or 'exchange' the pony she is now riding with yours?

And when your daughter is ready, she could take over!

If this pony is as sweet as you say, I'm sure you'll find a solution.

I like this idea. We did something similar when I was a little kid. Had to put my small down, bought a very nice large who after a while I decided I just didn't like. I could ride him but I just didn't like him. Ended up riding the evil medium pony owned by the barn that was too hot to use in lessons. We did sell the pony I didn't like but had a baby that had been bred for me that I broke (with help) when I was about 13. In the meantime I had a blast on the naughty pony.

I'm in PA - Chester County - and know of a few girls looking for ponies right now. All in PC and all working with a very competent trainer if you would like to send me your pony's info I can pass it on.

chunky munky
Nov. 14, 2011, 07:01 PM
again, generalizations. And no, the pony is not untrained. She is smart and knows DD is small. She's broke, broke broke. I wish I had a pony like that when i was 8. That being said, when i was 8, i was twice DD's size.



Yup. I tend to generalize after 56 years of showing horses and 41 years of being a trainer and USEF official. Its called experience. Certainly there are exceptions, but not as often as we all wish...

myalter1
Nov. 14, 2011, 09:30 PM
No one is doubting your credentials or experience. Generalizations are not always the truth, nor do they fit every circumstance. I think in this case, we will just agree to disagree.

vxf111
Nov. 14, 2011, 11:29 PM
Be careful who you lease it to! Bad things can happen, like someone claiming they own your lease pony, racking up show bills on the pony, getting it USEF suspended-- and then dumping it in your lap!!!! Or more innocous stuff, like their kids lets your pony develop bad habits. So be UBER CAREFUL! Horror stories abound!

Kryswyn
Nov. 14, 2011, 11:56 PM
That is why the OP, being an experienced COTH poster WILL GET IT IN WRITING and build in fail-safes like weekly/monthy pictures and reports. Fortunately, I don't think this particular pony is in danger of being rushed off to the AA's and racking up bills. :)

hequestrian
Nov. 15, 2011, 12:03 AM
My sisters large pony is "leased" by my barns lesson program. It works out wonderfully. I see him all the time, and we just have to pay for his shoes and yearly vaccinations. He isn't fancy but he's a nice guy and my sister didn't want to sell him when she stopped riding him so now she can ride him almost any time she wants (never, haha) and he gets tons of love! Win win for us. I hope you find a solution :)

myalter1
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:13 AM
kryswyn...so right. DH is an attorney and everything I do, I do in writing. Always. She's a children's hunter pony. Not a division pony at all (although apparently she did go to pony finals in the greens years ago..)

:)

myalter1
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:14 AM
THANK YOU everyone for your support. It's been great and I appreciate all of the input...

vxf111
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:39 AM
That is why the OP, being an experienced COTH poster WILL GET IT IN WRITING and build in fail-safes like weekly/monthy pictures and reports. Fortunately, I don't think this particular pony is in danger of being rushed off to the AA's and racking up bills. :)

Would you be surprised to learn that it was an "experienced COTH poster" who DID all the racking up of bills/fraudlent registration of someone else's pony etc. that I mentioned in my cautionary post?

You never know who is a total slimeball, and sad to say you have to be VERY careful who you trust.

KateWooten
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:39 AM
slightly OT, but what is the difference between a children's hunter pony and a division pony ... there are divisions in children's hunters aren't there ?

myalter1
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:42 AM
"Division" pony shows in the pony hunters (AA rated divisions). Childrens hunter pony shows in the C rated division. Different fence heights. Different quality /characteristics between the regular division ponies and the childrens ponies. It used to be a more dramatic difference, although now you see some very fancy ponies doing the childrens...

vxf...i believe you 100%...there are a LOT of slimeballs out there...

Mayaty02
Nov. 15, 2011, 08:42 AM
^^ children's ponies are generally less competitive, lower jump heights than regular division ponies. For instance, this pony being a medium, would have to jump 2'6" in the medium pony division, but 2 ft or 2'3" in the Children's. The lines are not as long and the ponies not quite as fancy, although division ponies normally step down to childrens at some point. And the divisions are AA rated...