PDA

View Full Version : Trainer or coach? William Micklem COTH article



vineyridge
Nov. 9, 2011, 01:40 PM
It's just been posted on the Chronicle Website here:
http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/its-not-all-about-you-coach

He speaks from experience as he is a Fellow of the British Horse Society.

One point that he made is that the goal of coaching is to render the student independent. Not to keep them in leading strings forever. I've known trainers who are so insecure that independence by their students seems to attack the very basis of their psyches.

People train horses; I rather like the idea that what our teachers should do is coach.

Your thoughts?

justathought
Nov. 9, 2011, 02:18 PM
Great column... and so true. Another grea quote about teaching....

“I've come to the frightening conclusioin that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It's my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or de-humanized.” and

Differentiate between acceptance and approval.

Ginott offers these suggestions:

Don't invite dependence
Don't hurry to correct facts.
Don't violate his privacy.
Avoid clichés and preaching.
Don't talk in chapters.
Don't label him.
Don't use reverse psychology.
Don't send contradictory messages.
Don't futurize.

"Concerned adults serve best when with confidence they stand and wait."


Dr. Haim Ginott

Those who inspire and guide rather than demand and dictate teach independence, achievement and confidence and these gifts last beyond a lifetime.

Dinah-do
Nov. 9, 2011, 02:36 PM
Timely.

juststartingout
Nov. 10, 2011, 12:56 PM
Just read this article ... very surprised it has not generated more discussion

William Ireland
Nov. 13, 2011, 02:20 PM
I would like to take the opportunity through this forum to thank all those on both the Chronicle facebook wall and to my e-mail who have been so supportive and encouraging about what I said about coaching in my recent CoTH article It's Not All About You Coach. The positive response has been simply phenomenal.

We have such an extraordinary, wonderful, life enhancing sport and without doubt there are thousands of potential riders and large numbers of existing riders who could benefit from better coaching. BUT this does not mean we have bad coaches, what it means is that we need to invest in coach training. No other investment can bring a bigger return. If riding sports can buy into this strategy then more funding will be found and more riders will benefit. As Olympic Gold Medalist and leader of London 2012 Olympics, Sebastian Coe, says "our future success is dependent on good coaches not talented athletes." The coaches develop, encourage, guide, inspire, facilitate, and free the talent that is in every country. We need more good coaches and from this pool will come those great coaches that will fulfil the dreams of our sport.

pony grandma
Nov. 13, 2011, 03:12 PM
Dr. Haim Ginott

Those who inspire and guide rather than demand and dictate teach independence, achievement and confidence and these gifts last beyond a lifetime.

Reminds me of the leadership quote that speaks the same as teaching:
" If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader." John Quincy Adams



Just read this article ... very surprised it has not generated more discussion

I thought the same thing when I first saw that Viney posted this on the Eventing. I thought oh goody, can't wait for all the posts discussing this.

The person who first taught me real riding advocated independence. I raised my daughters with horses the same way.

Unfortunately the trainer mentality prevades b/c they have to earn a living and have to zealously protect their sources of income. So they hold their cards tightly close and divvy them out and demand loyalty of their clients so that they can 'belong' to the exclusive club.

Not my cup of tea, or bottle of beer :D

juststartingout
Nov. 13, 2011, 03:21 PM
I would like to take the opportunity through this forum to thank all those on both the Chronicle facebook wall and to my e-mail who have been so supportive and encouraging about what I said about coaching in my recent CoTH article It's Not All About You Coach. The positive response has been simply phenomenal.

We have such an extraordinary, wonderful, life enhancing sport and without doubt there are thousands of potential riders and large numbers of existing riders who could benefit from better coaching. BUT this does not mean we have bad coaches, what it means is that we need to invest in coach training. No other investment can bring a bigger return. If riding sports can buy into this strategy then more funding will be found and more riders will benefit. As Olympic Gold Medalist and leader of London 2012 Olympics, Sebastian Coe, says "our future success is dependent on good coaches not talented athletes." The coaches develop, encourage, guide, inspire, facilitate, and free the talent that is in every country. We need more good coaches and from this pool will come those great coaches that will fulfil the dreams of our sport.

Thanks for posting --- great inspiring article!

copper1
Nov. 14, 2011, 06:39 AM
I always thought my job as a trainer/teacher/coach was for my students not to need me!

hoopoe
Nov. 14, 2011, 09:01 AM
Copper I would say, in my experience, you are the minorinty.

I think trainers ( coaches) see riders as a chronic source of income by making them dependent.

or making them feel they must play the game to make their way to the show ring.

by not teaching horsemanship or encouraging their riders to be so, they teach dependency.

grooms braiders warm up assistants... you get the picture.