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View Full Version : Can't find your distances? Try this simple trick:



fordtraktor
Nov. 9, 2011, 10:51 AM
Being able to see!

Recently I've been super frustrated with myself for my deteriorating eye for distance. I've never had a perfect eye but I used to be decent enough, could see it in the corner and adjust the turn to meet the fence nicely. Recently it has just been awful. Just coming out of the corner and not seeing anything.

Then last week I noticed I can't see, well, at all. Can't read road signs, can't see leaves on the trees -- went to get my eyes checked and yes, I needed glasses in a serious way. No wonder I can't find the jumps with any precision, I can barely see where they are.

Oops. Got glasses. Still adjusting to the new depth perception but already better. Sigh -- how did I NOT notice I was half-blind?

BeeHoney
Nov. 9, 2011, 11:01 AM
:)

tidy rabbit
Nov. 9, 2011, 11:05 AM
Your post made me laugh. Thanks for sharing. I needed that this morning.

blueskye
Nov. 9, 2011, 11:32 AM
I once discovered after a really wretched lesson in which I managed to drop a saintly schoolie to the base of every.single.jump that I had my right contact lens in my left eye and vice versa. Doh!

OveroHunter
Nov. 9, 2011, 11:35 AM
Lol FT and Blueskye! Thanks for the laugh!

kelsey97
Nov. 9, 2011, 12:35 PM
LOL...hope you can "find" the jumps now :)

Lazy-Pony
Nov. 9, 2011, 12:49 PM
I can totally relate to this. I was really struggling with my distances, went home during the holidays and got contacts, and suddenly stopped missing my distances. Granted, I still (and always will) miss a distance every now and then, but contacts made my life so much better!

smurabito
Nov. 9, 2011, 12:52 PM
:lol: I wish that my contacts solved that problem for me :lol:

holaamigoalter
Nov. 9, 2011, 01:03 PM
I went forever being frustrated about not being able to see a distance. Until someone pointed out that I always have my head tilted funny. I put on an eye patch one day while schooling and saw EVERYTHING. My right eye was so bad it was screwing up my left eye. So now when I jump I awkwardly turn my head so I'm only looking out of my left eye. I look silly but who cares I can SEEE!!!!

spacytracy
Nov. 9, 2011, 01:05 PM
I really wish I could blame my issues on bad eyes. Sigh.

KateKat
Nov. 9, 2011, 01:08 PM
I really wish I could blame my issues on bad eyes. Sigh.

Right?? LOL

I think you don't notice you're half blind because it creeps up on you. And you just start to accept fuzzy street signs as the norm...

pryme_thyme
Nov. 9, 2011, 02:52 PM
I think you don't notice you're half blind because it creeps up on you. And you just start to accept fuzzy street signs as the norm...

LOL! Love this. I got new glasses last year for driving, I wonder if I should try contacts? I am quite afraid of sticking it in my eye...

Grasshopper
Nov. 9, 2011, 02:57 PM
LOL. Yup. Actually, for me, contacts work a lot better than glasses for finding distances. I think it has something to do with the peripheral vision. Of course, I am practically blind--my contacts prescription is -5.00 for each eye. :eek:

shoponee70
Nov. 9, 2011, 03:06 PM
Always good to know you can 'see with your eyes" ! Thanks! :) oh ive done the flipped contact thing, and the im at a show, ripped contact no spares going to ride totally off my inner eye -- yeah..that was a scary course.. Im sure the judge wrote ( SMNR ) next to my name on the score card ( scared me no ribbon) :D

MoonRiver5
Nov. 9, 2011, 03:12 PM
Ha! I totally relate to this. I was in complete denial about needing glasses, until an extra element in a gymnastic caught me COMPLETELY by surprise, because the natural rails blended in with the indoor footing and I didn't know it was there until I was on top of it. (My horse is a saint.) Funny how being able to SEE the jumps actually helps out a whole lot.

Dewey
Nov. 9, 2011, 06:49 PM
LOL! Love this. I got new glasses last year for driving, I wonder if I should try contacts? I am quite afraid of sticking it in my eye...

Contacts are much better than glasses for riding. I found glasses and helmet to be awkward and uncomfortable. I don't love wearing contacts, but for riding, they are better--at least to me.

I am middle-aged, so instead of the bifocal contacts, I wear one contact for reading and the other for distance. It works great.

KateKat
Nov. 9, 2011, 06:56 PM
Ha! I totally relate to this. I was in complete denial about needing glasses, until an extra element in a gymnastic caught me COMPLETELY by surprise, because the natural rails blended in with the indoor footing and I didn't know it was there until I was on top of it. (My horse is a saint.) Funny how being able to SEE the jumps actually helps out a whole lot.

This made me :lol: only because it sounds exactly like something I would do. Thank GOD for our colorful jumps or I would be screwed. Oh so screwed.

Renn/aissance
Nov. 9, 2011, 06:58 PM
As someone with an eye disorder that has already required two surgeries to maintain my ability to perceive depth and distance- I know I need to visit the opthalmologist when I keep missing. :lol: Thank goodness for my saint of a horse.

Welcome to the four-eyed clan. If you're going to ride with glasses (as I've done for the better part of the last 20 years) invest in flex-frames if you can find them, and get a good warranty for when your horse spooks and smacks you in the side of the head with his face. ;)

doublesstable
Nov. 9, 2011, 07:28 PM
I really wish I could blame my issues on bad eyes. Sigh.

I thought the same thing :lol:

As I age I can now not read the numbers on my cell phone... so maybe, just maybe I can blame it on my eyes... he he.

iechris
Nov. 9, 2011, 07:33 PM
Getting new glasses next month. This has got me thinking I might try wearing them in a lesson.

fordtraktor
Nov. 9, 2011, 08:25 PM
As someone with an eye disorder that has already required two surgeries to maintain my ability to perceive depth and distance- I know I need to visit the opthalmologist when I keep missing. :lol: Thank goodness for my saint of a horse.

Welcome to the four-eyed clan. If you're going to ride with glasses (as I've done for the better part of the last 20 years) invest in flex-frames if you can find them, and get a good warranty for when your horse spooks and smacks you in the side of the head with his face. ;)

Thanks...it is unfortunately a welcome back. I used to have a -8 prescription (translation: really darn blind) but had LASIK. I think I was in denial that I have to go back to glasses.

Ditto on the saint of a horse, my poor green TB is just a star for tolerating me over the last few months with nary a stop or even a bobble. Love that fellow!

Bascule99
Nov. 9, 2011, 09:41 PM
I always wondered why I saw distances better off the left lead than my right. Decades later I learned in handgun training that my left eye is my dominate eye, even though I am right-handed. I had to hold the handgun in a different position than most right-handed people.

There is a way to find out which eye is dominate. Clasp your hands together and reach out to straighten arms so hands are at arm's length. Leave a little triangle of open space just above your thumbs. Stare at that space for a 10 seconds and then without blinking, SLOWLY bring your hands directly straight toward your nose/face. Gradually you will find that the space is right in front of one of your eyes (one of your eyes will see through the hole while the other eye misses part of the space). Make sure arms come toward your face without leaning left or right.

For me, this explained a lot!! I never missed on left lead; right lead...was work!

TheJenners
Nov. 9, 2011, 10:17 PM
LOL. Yup. Actually, for me, contacts work a lot better than glasses for finding distances. I think it has something to do with the peripheral vision. Of course, I am practically blind--my contacts prescription is -5.00 for each eye. :eek:
Good heavens!! :eek:

To those thinking about contacts...Try them! They aren't as scary as you may think. I've been wearing them for years. It WILL take trial and error to find ones that you like, because in addition to brands, there is also how much the contact "cups" your eye. My first brand (Acuvue Oasys) is the one I still wear, and my eyes are between sizes. My last eye appt was a NIGHTMARE because my normal guy wasn't available for months, so I used someone else who a. apparently doesn't like that brand and b. felt my current size was too tight. He made me try four different brands and the flatter size, even though I kept going back and saying I didn't like the way they felt and they slipped around on my eye. Grr. I finally yelled at the receptionist, not her fault I know, but by this time the outside corners of my eyes were raw from rubbing. I asked if my brand was going out of business or something, and she said no. I said I wanted my old ones and that was it!!

mepkkg
Nov. 9, 2011, 10:27 PM
I always wondered why I saw distances better off the left lead than my right. Decades later I learned in handgun training that my left eye is my dominate eye, even though I am right-handed. I had to hold the handgun in a different position than most right-handed people.

There is a way to find out which eye is dominate. Clasp your hands together and reach out to straighten arms so hands are at arm's length. Leave a little triangle of open space just above your thumbs. Stare at that space for a 10 seconds and then without blinking, SLOWLY bring your hands directly straight toward your nose/face. Gradually you will find that the space is right in front of one of your eyes (one of your eyes will see through the hole while the other eye misses part of the space). Make sure arms come toward your face without leaning left or right.

For me, this explained a lot!! I never missed on left lead; right lead...was work!

That's interesting as I'm the same way, I see distances much easier off the left lead. I wear glasses in class and for school work so this has got be thinking about talking to my eye doctor about contacts for riding..

holaamigoalter
Nov. 10, 2011, 01:56 AM
I always wondered why I saw distances better off the left lead than my right. Decades later I learned in handgun training that my left eye is my dominate eye, even though I am right-handed. I had to hold the handgun in a different position than most right-handed people.

There is a way to find out which eye is dominate. Clasp your hands together and reach out to straighten arms so hands are at arm's length. Leave a little triangle of open space just above your thumbs. Stare at that space for a 10 seconds and then without blinking, SLOWLY bring your hands directly straight toward your nose/face. Gradually you will find that the space is right in front of one of your eyes (one of your eyes will see through the hole while the other eye misses part of the space). Make sure arms come toward your face without leaning left or right.

For me, this explained a lot!! I never missed on left lead; right lead...was work!

try my eyepatch trick! you won't have to work if your only using your left eye.

CVPeg
Nov. 10, 2011, 01:03 PM
I only read the thread title, and was going to add my suggestion to whatever neat gimmick you had, then realized you had the same experience that I had!

I got heart horse #1 after finding my first real job after college, eons ago...

Brought him from a greenie to adult eq and hunter. The most honest horse I ever rode - never stopped at a fence. (A Jr in between horses, borrowed him for a couple of Medal/Maclay classes - because we all knew no matter what combination, curve, or tight spot the course had, he'd take her through it. He got her qualified...)

The last year I owned him, he kept ducking left. In fact, the day before one show, we tried schooling him with a huge crossrail - with the left hand side going higher and higher. He kept going left with me - (it became one enormous jump!). I sold him a few months later...he was improving beyond what I could afford to show him.

Another few months' later, I was living and working away - was at Friendly's - I couldn't read the flavors on the rotating ice cream list they had. Realized I needed glasses. I got them. Took a couple of lessons. Guess what - I had been riding to the left to see my spot!:sigh:

I've always regretted that I didn't know it before I let him go. Not that my financial situation would have changed - but we would have definitely been more consistent, I believe.

So glad you found out in time!

Quin
Nov. 10, 2011, 02:25 PM
I had a related problem. I've worn glasses forever and I literally need to put them on even just to find the bathroom in the middle of the night. I am extremely nearsighted.

A few years back, though, I also developed a need for bifocals. Grumbled but got them and it was nice to be able to read without taking the glasses OFF.

BUT - I started to see an extra stride or two right in front of the fence. Drove Trainer Lady NUTS. I realized that as I switched from the top/distance vision portion of the glasses to the bifocal area on the bottom, the depth perception moved slightly. The fence was nice and clear, but the distance had moved.

So the last time I got glasses I went to the mall and got one of those two-for-one deals. I got one pair made up with the full prescription and had them make me a second pair just with monovision lenses, using the distance vision portion of the prescription for the entire lens.

Works like a charm. Fixed the distance problem. Didn't fix anything else, but that's not the fault of the glasses........:winkgrin:

sopha
Nov. 10, 2011, 06:39 PM
I am fairly impared (I only aspire to be a -5 as my contacts are -10) and do find that fresh contacts do make the world a much better place. I do have issues with depth perception and there is absolutely nothing that upsets me more than light grey rails and light grey footing. I always prefer high contrast!!