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View Full Version : First IHSA jumping tomorrow... help! -- *UPDATE!*



sschuessler
Oct. 29, 2011, 07:08 PM
So I pointed out of adv. w/t/c tonight and tomorrow I am going to be in novice over fences and flat. I have jumped in shows before, but i have never jumped an unknown horse before. And, I have not jumped in over a month.Truthfully, i am scared out of my mind at the thought of it, but I have no choice but to jump tomorrow. The fences are small (only 2'3" at most), but still.

Any ideas how to calm myself down??

AliCat
Oct. 29, 2011, 07:10 PM
Where are you showing?

LeandraB
Oct. 29, 2011, 07:38 PM
I don't know where you show but I will be riding at the Goucher show tomorrow!
My advice is to try to watch the horse go and ask riders from the school about him (in addition to the description given) in order to get a feel for what kind of ride it'll be. I find that by the time I step into the ring i know how the horse is going to go and how I need to ride.
Try not to get nervous and give whatever horse you get on a soft and consistent ride. Focus in your opening circle about establishing your rhythm and putting the horse between your hands and legs. If you can be consistent your course should flow from there.

sschuessler
Oct. 29, 2011, 08:02 PM
I am showing at the RIT show tomorrow.

MHM
Oct. 29, 2011, 08:25 PM
I am showing at the RIT show tomorrow.

At Lehman Farm in Pittsford?

They have a nice group of horses there. Any one of them will take good care of you. :)

Good luck and have fun!

enjoytheride
Oct. 29, 2011, 08:30 PM
If you are nervous and have not jumping in a month then consider not jumping at this show and take a few jumping lessons before your next show.

Otherwise watch as much of the jumping as you can so you can get an idea of the kind of ride your draw needs. You can also ask whoever is holding the horse what the horse is like.

ChasseurSauteur
Oct. 29, 2011, 08:50 PM
If you're showing at Lehman, I'll second the poster who pointed out that any horse you draw there will be a good confidence builder for you! When I first started showing IHSA, I found that being very confident in my plan helped me a lot - it's one part of IHSA showing that you can totally control. Walk the course with an eye to knowing where you want to be every step of the course, no matter which horse you're on. Envision the entire trip when you go over it in your mind (don't just point to the jumps in the proper order - think about the feel you want all the way around), so that when you get in the ring, your plan is utterly familiar.
Take a moment when you get in the ring to take a deep breath and slow down your brain. You can do it - becoming a thinking rider who can make active decisions in the ring, 'thinking slow' without letting nerves take over, is part of the process. Best of luck!

netg
Oct. 29, 2011, 09:32 PM
If you're showing at Lehman, I'll second the poster who pointed out that any horse you draw there will be a good confidence builder for you! When I first started showing IHSA, I found that being very confident in my plan helped me a lot - it's one part of IHSA showing that you can totally control. Walk the course with an eye to knowing where you want to be every step of the course, no matter which horse you're on. Envision the entire trip when you go over it in your mind (don't just point to the jumps in the proper order - think about the feel you want all the way around), so that when you get in the ring, your plan is utterly familiar.
Take a moment when you get in the ring to take a deep breath and slow down your brain. You can do it - becoming a thinking rider who can make active decisions in the ring, 'thinking slow' without letting nerves take over, is part of the process. Best of luck!

This. Visualize, and ride it in your mind. Multiple times.

Novice IHSA horses are usually pretty uncomplicated, with a bit of push needed for a lot of them. Really think about your turns and where you're going - if a horse has been used as a lesson horse it will know all about cutting corners any time it can get away with it. At Novice, the over fences classes are much more about how you ride between them than how you ride over them because of their size, so think of it as a flat equitation class with some large ground poles thrown in. :)

sp56
Oct. 29, 2011, 09:50 PM
Novice is small - the horses can walk over it. Just ride your rhythm and focus on your rhythm and track. If you keep your mind constantly focused on your rhythm and track, you won't have time to be worried.

I used to tell our girls that their first time out was going to be bad. As long as you come out of the ring on the horse and with all your clothes on, it was a success. ;)

My first IHSA round was hilarious and horrible. It only got better from there and even pinned at Nationals twice. So your first round does not indicate how the rest of your IHSA career is going to go! :)

joiedevie99
Oct. 30, 2011, 01:38 PM
1. If you don't feel ready, you can show in Novice flat and not Novice fences. You don't have to do both.

2. If you want to do it, try to stay as relaxed as you can, and grab mane over your fences. The novice school horses are usually a pretty good group of packers- and the course should be low and easy.

MHM
Oct. 30, 2011, 06:00 PM
Bump!

Well? How did it go??

sschuessler
Oct. 30, 2011, 08:24 PM
Well turns out when I got there that there was a mis count in my points and I still needed one more point The rules changed from 35 to point up to 36 and our captain didn't know that... so I stayed in adv w/t/c and got a 2nd.... so I will be doing novice this Saturday at the next show :) I'm gonna hopefully get a jumping lesson in and 2 more rides before it so I will be a bit more prepared :)

Rel6
Oct. 30, 2011, 09:32 PM
We used to host IHSA shows at Lehman's before the zones were re-organized.

Anyways, I just got back from a weekend of IHSA shows at Caz and SLU. I'm in open, so the horses are a little different, but we host our own shows and I school a lot of the novice horses.

Novice horses have to be pretty much idiot-proof, because the level varies a ton. There are novice riders who should not be jumping, and there are novice riders who hold their own in ride-offs against open riders.

My advice is ask the horse's handler for tips about the horse. Some handlers aren't allowed to say anything, in which case I would ask the Coach who is hosting the show. Double check with your trainer that this is acceptable first though.

If you can, watch the horse go. Look for it when it schools, see if it is in any classes before you, and watch how other riders ride it (and how the horse responds.) Ask your trainer to watch the horse too and see if she can give you some tips.

Good luck! And have fun :)

Rockfish
Oct. 31, 2011, 03:13 PM
Since this will be your first time jumping, and no one else has mentioned this yet, remember to enter/exit the ring at the walk. A gal at Goucher this weekend put in a nice and tidy course, but got DQed because she picked up the canter from the halt at the in gate.

sschuessler
Nov. 19, 2011, 04:16 PM
So.... I jumped today for the first time and amazingly, it went great! Got a 4th out of 8 over fences and 3rd on the flat. I drew a cute (yet extremely lazy) fat pony for the fences and we nailed all of them!... Except the first one where I jumped ahead of her and she saved my butt. But, All in all it was great!

MHM
Nov. 19, 2011, 04:26 PM
Congrats!

This was back at Lehman Farm again, right?

sschuessler
Nov. 19, 2011, 04:39 PM
yep-- it was Lehman

Chef Jade
Nov. 19, 2011, 10:36 PM
Great job! It is very intimidating to jump an unknown horse for even an advanced or more experienced rider. I give you and all the IHSA riders a lot of credit!