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Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 21, 2011, 09:05 AM
I ran across this video on Youtube and found it very pleasant to watch (including the hat!) I have no idea who the rider or instructor is. The poster seems to be a breeder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3UoIU_M6oI&feature=feedwll

Enjoy!

SillyHorse
Oct. 21, 2011, 12:48 PM
Normally I'd bitch about no helmet, but that really is one cool hat.

Velvet
Oct. 21, 2011, 01:40 PM
Collected trot????? Um, she needs to learn more about dressage. :lol: Try jog trotting. That would be more correct terminology for what I saw that horse doing in the video.

atr
Oct. 21, 2011, 02:02 PM
Maybe if she did a bigger trot the hat would fall off? Or flap up and down like Dumbo's ears?

mickeydoodle
Oct. 21, 2011, 02:04 PM
a bigger trot might make her fly off like Sally Fields ("The Flying Nun")

Lost_at_C
Oct. 21, 2011, 02:36 PM
Unfortunately I agree. It's soft and obedient, and the rider seems to have a nice position, but this is the typical jog-trot of baroque type horses. Many revert to this by nature and while it feels nice and maybe looks pretty, it isn't correct. They often need time to learn to open up without being hot and rushy.

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 21, 2011, 02:51 PM
It is a schooling video. Listen to the audio. The instructor says the mare maintains collected trot for 1-3 strides at a time.

(instructor's accent= dutch?)

Coreene
Oct. 21, 2011, 03:45 PM
(instructor's accent= dutch?)Nee, niet Hollands.

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 21, 2011, 03:58 PM
Nee, niet Hollands.

Hmmmm, German? Most decidedly NOT spanish, either.

HPFarmette
Oct. 21, 2011, 04:16 PM
There were palm trees in the background....

amm2cd
Oct. 21, 2011, 04:26 PM
From the description:
"I have found a completely natural, gentle, connected and effective way of riding thanks to trying some new techniques. These methods are about getting the horse straight and strong in the back and "through" before asking for higher level movements"

I don't see anything new about having a horse through and strong enough to do the work? Obviously I'm a noob and doing this dressage thing totallt wrong.

I agree on the jog-trot. I kept waiting for something to happen to get that horse tracking up....

mbm
Oct. 21, 2011, 05:26 PM
i think it is in really bad taste to pull a video of an random rider and bring it here to be deconstructed by the masses.

honestly please remove the link.

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 21, 2011, 05:54 PM
i think it is in really bad taste to pull a video of an random rider and bring it here to be deconstructed by the masses.

honestly please remove the link.

Umm,the poster posted it on Youtube to be viewed by the great unwashed. There could be no more public a place to post a video. :no:

I reposted it here because it caught my eye when looking at something else, and I found it aesthetically pleasing. To those watching without audio, they may not understand what it is, but from the trainer's comments, it is the first attempts to school the horse in a new way, and she is getting some very beginnings of collection here, and done in a soft, patient, quiet, encouraging way. Asking for the horse to lengthen its neck and raise its withers. I think it is lovely and the rider and trainer should be proud.

Regarding the palm trees, I assumed that the video was shot somewhere that they traditionally breed PREs or Lusitanos. Spain or Brazil. And that was intriguing too, with the trainer speaking heavily accented english that was decidedly not spanish or portuguese.

paulaedwina
Oct. 21, 2011, 06:16 PM
The accent sounds German or Austrian. She's in California.

Paula

mbm
Oct. 21, 2011, 06:19 PM
well at least it says that it is being posted here so the owner will be able to come and be torn apart :(

anyway, posting something on youtube is not the same as posting it on a bb for comment. and i know the OP enjoyed it but i also know that COTH being what it is, will be not nice things said etc etc all about an ammie that doesn't even know they are being torn apart.

i thought there were rules against thing kind of thing?

esdressage
Oct. 21, 2011, 06:23 PM
The accent sounds German or Austrian. She's in California.

Paula

I was thinking Austrian (?)

I do think the work is patient and encouraging, and I liked that the trainer asked the rider to go forward whenever the horse seemed to loose too much of the desire to go forward. It was a bit "joggy" but I agree that there were strides here and there that were getting it, and the whole thing was low pressure and relaxed, which I thought was lovely.

So, at one point the instructor was trying to get the rider to understand the feel of lifting the front end, and said to feel like bicycling backwards. I thought that was an interesting and nice analogy.

I'd really hate to stumble across a video of me riding that had been posted here by somebody else, and then read a bunch of less than encouraging comments. I know the OP posted it as something lovely, but COTH is, well, COTH.

Velvet
Oct. 21, 2011, 07:37 PM
The problem I have is the use of the term "collected" (YouTube poster's words, not mine) in the video. Maybe she was learning a bit about gaining more engagement for very brief moments, but it was not "collection."

That's my disagreement. Maybe she needs to hear that. Maybe she needs to realize that, yes, you can slowly encourage things out of your horse, but using incorrect terminology is misleading at best.

alterhorse
Oct. 21, 2011, 08:17 PM
IMO, we can all learn from watching others ride. There need not be anything negatively connotated so long as any observations are presented only for the purpose of making general references to riding techniques that might apply to anyone.

In this video I see the beginnings of the creation of a circle of aids, that becomes interrupted primarily with the riders contact. The horse seems to respond by carrying itself and occasionally asking for more support from the rider.

I see a very sensitive and intelligent horse who I think would be interesting to see go with a more experienced, sensitive, and relaxed rider, to then see the comparison of how the horse reacts with that different rider, and then learn from that comparison.

kinnip
Oct. 21, 2011, 08:29 PM
I agree with mbm. The internet is a difficult place. There are many times people post something for the benefit of family, friends and colleagues, and it ends up going 'public'. That said, AWESOME HAT!

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 23, 2011, 08:53 AM
I agree with mbm. The internet is a difficult place. There are many times people post something for the benefit of family, friends and colleagues, and it ends up going 'public'. That said, AWESOME HAT!


There are many, many places to post photo and video on line that have security so that access is limited only to those people who you expressly allow. Totally free, too.

Putting a video on Youtube is the modern day equivalent of hanging it in the public square. There is a sidebar and a search feature that encourages strangers to check out different videos and just surf Youtube in general.

That does not mean that I think that the people who post their videos on Youtube "deserve" to be trashed. But it means that I think that I shouldn't worry about what mean people may say about someone who has broadcast their video there. I can only be responsible for myself, and I have never, and will never, post or repost a video or photo of someone for the purpose of ridiculing or deriding them.

paulaedwina
Oct. 23, 2011, 09:23 AM
Youtube is public this is true (unless you limit access), however, so are public conversations right. What I'm trying to say is that many things are done in public that we choose to not see or not hear. For example, you may clearly hear a conversation occurring in public, but you don't usually butt in to give your two cents. In crowded cities where people live in very close quarters family business cannot be helped but happen in an environment where it is visible to others. In those situations people choose not to see it.

So I don't think just because it's on you tube it's fair game to be lifted, posted, and critiqued.

JMO
Paula

Adamantane
Oct. 23, 2011, 09:32 AM
I'm guessing that whenever something is "on the screen" for several people to look at at the same time -- or pretty much the same time -- there's a natural inclination for those who've looked at it to comment about their impressions. Or, if others are commenting, to feel the need to weigh in. I think that's how sometimes these things snowball. The seeming anonymity of COTH or other forums boards and blogs probably disinhibits people a bit, and the lack of other information (tone of voice, body language, context) tends to make things clang more than they would in, say, a barn conversation, and certainly is conducive to misunderstandings, reactions and overreactions.

I try to assume that anything somebody posts that seems hostile or offensive probably wasn't intended to be, but more likely just dashed off quickly or impulsively or when one is in a bad frame of mind for unrelated reasons, like those e-mails we sometimes send that in retrospect we wish we'd taken a little more time or care with or not sent at all. (Of course sometimes there's just no way to find an excuse for the offender and then the challenge is not getting sucked into a downward spiral.)

I certainly know it was not and never will be EH's intent to post a video or photo to set someone up for ridicule.

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 23, 2011, 09:32 AM
Youtube is public this is true (unless you limit access)


Ethically, I have no problem with reposting if the poster has not exercised the option to limit access.

Ethically, I have a problem with denigrating people under any circumstances, so maybe that's why I don't have a problem with reposting.

paulaedwina
Oct. 23, 2011, 09:36 AM
I'm just having an academic discussion on this topic. I didn't think the OP intended to post the video to deride the rider. I thought it was neat to watch. I think this kind of technology will cause us to revise our rules of propriety, and I assume it will all settle out fine.

Paula

mbm
Oct. 23, 2011, 12:27 PM
fwiw, i didnt say that the OP posted it to deride it... however, knowing how COTH operates, there is a good chance that people will post snide comments and it will get ugly fast.

but my main point was that i find it in bad taste to link to a video/picture/what have you, of a amateur in a non public environment and put it up for discussion.

i dont care if it is posted on youtube - it still isnt right in my world.

also, i find it disturbing that nowadays people cant control themselves and instead blame someone else for their bad manners....

such as : well they posted it on you tube therefore they must of wanted their video to be linked to and discussed - if they didnt want me to do that they should of hidden it....

??????

how about instead: honoring peoples privacy and ASKING before doing such a thing?

Velvet
Oct. 23, 2011, 12:37 PM
how about instead: honoring peoples privacy and ASKING before doing such a thing?

They gave up their right to privacy when they posted it in a public forum. It's not akin to a private conversation that someone has overheard. In this case, the person is up on a soap box in a public square and speaking. In that case, any person who happens upon the speaker or even sees the speech recorded and posted will have a right to comment upon it.

There is no requirement of asking if the person wants to hear a rebuttal or not. They have opened themselves up for the public to comment and agree or disagree.

Eclectic Horseman
Oct. 23, 2011, 01:47 PM
They gave up their right to privacy when they posted it in a public forum. It's not akin to a private conversation that someone has overheard. In this case, the person is up on a soap box in a public square and speaking. In that case, any person who happens upon the speaker or even sees the speech recorded and posted will have a right to comment upon it.

There is no requirement of asking if the person wants to hear a rebuttal or not. They have opened themselves up for the public to comment and agree or disagree.

Thank you, Velvet. My point exactly, put more articulately.