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View Full Version : Spur rests/spur straps ...help!



Countrywood
Oct. 13, 2011, 01:45 PM
I am just starting to use spurs on my horse . For some unknown reason, the spur rest on my boot is set way too high. Has anyone added another spur rest to a boot? Did you take the original one off, or leave it there?

And then the spur straps felt like they were slipping even when I tightened them...

Horse went well but got super forward, the trainer who was nice enough to look at them said I had them set way too high because of that dumb spur rest but when I put them lower than spur rest they slip and wiggle around!! Help!! :eek:

handfish
Oct. 13, 2011, 02:12 PM
Is there a reason why the spur is too high? Can you get a shorter spur and have it sit where it's supposed?

Otherwise, rubber-covered.

Fixating
Oct. 13, 2011, 02:19 PM
Eh, sometimes I have to move my spur over or under the rest depending on the size/shape of the horse...I'm having a hard time picturing your problem though. Do you have too much strap under your foot? I can see this possibly causing wiggling. Or are the spurs just too wide?

Countrywood
Oct. 13, 2011, 02:19 PM
It was too high because I strapped it on over the spur rest on my boot, which is set very high...the trainer told me to strap it under the spur rest but then it slipped down...so I am wondering if anyone ever added a second spur rest lower down on their boot? Any secret to strapping it so it does not move? the spur was rubber covered and slipped less than the metal ones.

netg
Oct. 13, 2011, 02:34 PM
It was too high because I strapped it on over the spur rest on my boot, which is set very high...the trainer told me to strap it under the spur rest but then it slipped down...so I am wondering if anyone ever added a second spur rest lower down on their boot? Any secret to strapping it so it does not move? the spur was rubber covered and slipped less than the metal ones.

Tighten the strap where it runs under your foot because if it fit above the rest, it was going to be too loose below.

You shouldn't need a spur rest to hold a spur in place. I use mine to make sure my spurs are even, but that's about it.

ideayoda
Oct. 13, 2011, 03:05 PM
The spur should be horizontal and the spur rest is rarely too high, lengthen the part that goes under the foot and make the spur horizontal to the counter.

THe other way is to use a second spur strap, and use it as the spur rest under the spur part which is out the back, it can help it be steadier.

kinnip
Oct. 13, 2011, 03:15 PM
I have short little legs, and don't like the location of most spur rests. I really like the slip-on spurs that rest on the top of the boot heel. With the strap-ons, I just ignore the rest and put them where I want them. The only time I have floppy spurs is if the strap is too loose or the branches are too wide. You can get rubber "spur protectors" that may take up some extra space. I have found that older spurs, I have a pair of Star Steel Silver spurs, tend to fit a bit tighter. Cruise eBay, and see what you can find for tinier feet.

joiedevie99
Oct. 13, 2011, 03:28 PM
Depends entirely on rider's leg conformation compared to horse's barrel conformation. On my current horse, all spur rests are too high. I use a longer spur set very low on my foot. Works like a charm. I got those cheap nylon spur straps- I find them way easier to crank tight so the spur stays put without a spur rest.

Countrywood
Oct. 13, 2011, 04:40 PM
I have relatively short legs too, so the spurs are higher on him anyway just due to leg conformation (mine-five foot two, 29" inseam)

I need them lower. He was very motivated with them but bucked a few times when they poked him due to them being too high I think.

netg
Oct. 13, 2011, 05:40 PM
I have relatively short legs too, so the spurs are higher on him anyway just due to leg conformation (mine-five foot two, 29" inseam)

I need them lower. He was very motivated with them but bucked a few times when they poked him due to them being too high I think.

You mean poked him with them on accident?

I tend to believe if you can't keep a spur from poking your horse, you shouldn't be wearing it. And height isn't the issue - toes pointing out/legs moving too much is. As long as your spurs are on the back line of your leg, it shouldn't matter if they're on your heel, your ankle, or your lower calf - they shouldn't touch your horse by accident.

I'm 5'1" and my 16.3hh horse is on the hairy edge of too big for me. My spurs sit on the spur rest and don't touch him if I don't want them to... but I keep my toes forward.

When I rode western and h/j, my spurs avoided my horse from my heels being down. Heels down don't keep spurs off in dressage, as you're supposed to be soft and moving through your ankles to absorb motion rather than locked into the hyperflexed position equitation judges love.

Countrywood
Oct. 13, 2011, 06:00 PM
I don't know if I poked him, or just used them too strongly ( only his third time ridden with spurs, green project horse last time was 6 months ago and he reacted so strongly I put them away till now). I am having the trainer ride him tommorow in them so he can settle down with her riding him in spurs. ( I dropped training on a reg basis due to $ but things are looking up).

He needs the spurs as lacks forward without them, toda he was very forward and listening but a couple of times imo I used them too strongly (or poked him), and he let me know with a buck, so I made sure to keep my ankles out and away from his sides after that ( a good way to learn lol). The trainer said they were much too high on my boot and that was part of the problem. I also want to buy a softer edge spur these were blunt edges not round edges.

ideayoda
Oct. 13, 2011, 06:49 PM
Spurs touch a horse because of the toe turning too much out, not because of the horse's conformation per se. Keep the foot parallel and they don't touch (esp the short POW which most use).

Beentheredonethat
Oct. 13, 2011, 10:34 PM
I have never been able to get spur rests to work right. And then I got boots without them and could not keep the spurs from slipping, and making my own spur rest really didn't work. Just use a second set of spur straps to set the spur exactly where you want it. It works a lot better.

ideayoda
Oct. 14, 2011, 08:08 AM
Spurs are not for forward, they are for nuance, If the horse needs to be more active teach the horse the leg (with support of the whip...touch/vibrate/twack....progressively).

Rounded edges on a POW spur is best. They will not slip down IF the shank is horizontal, most peeps end up with them not parallel to the counter (of the boot).

Countrywood
Oct. 14, 2011, 08:40 AM
How do you attach two spur straps? (great idea)

I realize that spurs are not supposed to be for forward, but have been using the whip and legs for months, and we have a few forward issues ( this horse stood unridden in a field first 13 years of his life, part mustang, he truly does not want to go sometimes...as in he has his own mind times x ten ). The spurs make such a huge difference in a positive way I think I am at the stage where they are needed, not to jab him with but to reinforce the leg.

The fact that I may have poked him a few times by accident while I figure out how to keep heel away, I am not happy about it, but can't keep fighting him for forward on every ride. A former trainer I engaged for months refused to get on the horse and stuck me with doing all the riding, so I let that person go. The trainer I want to use now will get on and ride him and thinks spurs will benefit him. So I guess at a certain point certain horses may need them for forward and then it can drop back to the desired role of nuance...that is what I hope and I would perfer to use them on occasion instead of all the time if the role of nuance is beyond us now..I am going to pick up a pair of rounded edge gentle ones today. Thanks for all the helpful advice everyone!

Velvet
Oct. 14, 2011, 09:29 AM
The spur should be horizontal and the spur rest is rarely too high, lengthen the part that goes under the foot and make the spur horizontal to the counter.

THe other way is to use a second spur strap, and use it as the spur rest under the spur part which is out the back, it can help it be steadier.

^This!^ Most people are pretty clueless about the correct position of their spurs.

I also always use a second spur strap just to make sure they stay where they should--even when I have a spur rest on my boot. All you do is strap your spurs on normally and then take an extra spur strap and wrap it under the spur in the back and around to the front of your ankle--buckling it so the buckles are all on the same side (kind of hides the buckle in with the first one). You don't run it through the spur, just use it under to support it and keep it in place. There are some other variations that work, too, but this is the one I personally like best. It's just like putting on a belt around the spur to make it stay in place.

cllane1
Oct. 14, 2011, 09:39 AM
I also always use a second spur strap just to make sure they stay where they should--even when I have a spur rest on my boot. All you do is strap your spurs on normally and then take an extra spur strap and wrap it under the spur in the back and around to the front of your ankle--buckling it so the buckles are all on the same side (kind of hides the buckle in with the first one). You don't run it through the spur, just use it under to support it and keep it in place. There are some other variations that work, too, but this is the one I personally like best. It's just like putting on a belt around the spur to make it stay in place.

Genius! My paddock boots have no spur rests at all, and my spurs slip terribly no matter how I tighten or adjust them. Going to try this method tonight!

Countrywood
Oct. 14, 2011, 10:05 AM
Great tip on the second spur strap to hold it in place Genious indeed! :)

BEARCAT
Oct. 14, 2011, 10:13 AM
I use the 2 straps method and those have quickly become my favourites:
http://www.sstack.com/product/nylon-spur-strap-with-velcro-closure/


The velcro makes it so that you can easily get them tight and they are fairly low profile (well, maybe not in purple...) ;)

Countrywood
Oct. 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
Great pircie on those like the velcro too.

LSM1212
Oct. 14, 2011, 10:55 AM
Spurs are not for forward, they are for nuance, If the horse needs to be more active teach the horse the leg (with support of the whip...touch/vibrate/twack....progressively).

This... I rode my horse with spurs for years. And it just seemed to get worse (not going forward). I got so fed up with it that I went back to square one.

Squeeze, no response, smack. Rinse and repeat as many times as needed. I went from doing this about 30 times a ride down to just a few. And now he just needs a reminder from time to time but is much more respectful of my leg. It took a few months for him to finally get that I meant business. And the key to all of it was... consistency. If I let one "disobedience" slide... we had to start back from scratch again.

Part of it was my leg wasn't steady as I had just started back riding after many years off. So he learned to ignore a lot of my leg "stuff". But now that I'm much more steady, I want him to respond and he is learning that too.

Countrywood
Oct. 14, 2011, 11:16 AM
LSM212,

Have been using the whip for months..trust me, when this horse wants to he just blows it off, the whip, he does. ( same on lunge line, he just does not care about a whip, he'll pin his ears and just plant his feet. He is an interesting guy to put it mildly...beautiful gaits, great fun on the ground, a big love, but very independent minded and he has figured out a whip can only feel x so he'd rather ignore it or kick out at it ) But he does seem to immediatly react to the feeling of the spurs, so much so that he almost was like a different horse on yesterday's ride.

I agree in general with what you say but sometimes one has to do what works...after he becomes (hopefully) forward from leg with spurs will either use them sporadically till we progress enough that the spurs be used for what they are intended for, nuance, lateral work etc or else I will use extremely small round ones, they even sell plastic nub ones, if he seems to go better with them on.

LSM1212
Oct. 14, 2011, 03:18 PM
Then that's a respect issue.... and a subject for another day. :)

Best of luck!!!

CatPS
Oct. 14, 2011, 03:27 PM
I use these... they protect my boots AND keep the spurs from slipping. Well worth the $2 for me.

http://www.victorycanter.com/Centaur-Spur-Protector-p-17896.html

Velvet
Oct. 14, 2011, 03:48 PM
I use these... they protect my boots AND keep the spurs from slipping. Well worth the $2 for me.

http://www.victorycanter.com/Centaur-Spur-Protector-p-17896.html

Never stop my spurs from slipping, just from making marks on my boots.

atr
Oct. 14, 2011, 04:21 PM
Make sure your spurs aren't too wide for your foot, also--most are bendable with a little care. Too narrow is agonising, though...

I find that if I very carefully adjust the straps on my spurs so they are level and the strap is done up snug (can need an extra/intermediate hole,) they stay put. Also, once set, I hardly ever take my spurs off my tall boots...

Countrywood
Oct. 16, 2011, 02:53 PM
Happy update...after rainer rode him Friday . I rode him Sat with a friend riding with me and he was pretty good. I told friend spur problem and she generously gave me an extra pair she had that turned out to be PERFECT, short length, gently rounded with a bit of a square end under the round edges, and a tight fit on boot so they don't slip. I rode him today in them for first time and we went great, he atually seemed to welcome them for clarity, and for the first time I felt I was using my legs with spurs as nuance, ...and we cantered in a big field for first time, with my friend and a bunch of horses around and he was really good, so thanks for all advice I finally resolved the spur problem ( now have to continue working on everything else lol)

It is a little frightening in dressage how the right or wrong equipment can make such a difference...like what else is wrong with all my stuff...