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walktrot
Oct. 4, 2011, 03:38 PM
I've been reading for quite a while now for casual local barn schooling shows. At some point the kids will be moving up to a "real" show sponsored by the local organization. A few of them are working hard at memorizing their tests, but we always give them the option of having them read.

I'm wondering if there are rules or regulations for reading. Specifically, do you literally read exactly what is on the form? I'm thinking about a couple of movements in Intro C and Training that say something along the lines of "A circle right 20 meters developing working canter in the first quarter of the circle, right lead. Before A working trot rising." Quite a mouthful. Can that be abbreviated?

I enjoy reading and have been told I'm quite good at it. Just want to make sure I do it right.

Thanks!

CLB15
Oct. 4, 2011, 03:59 PM
I always heard that it had to be read out loud as it was written. Having said that, without thinking about what I was doing, I did once read one of the old first level tests to someone and simply said "stretchy trot" and didn't get in trouble for doing so ;)

ideayoda
Oct. 4, 2011, 04:37 PM
Read what is written, and you canNOT repeat something (or the rider is eliminated).

joiedevie99
Oct. 4, 2011, 04:45 PM
And never read the things in parenthesis.

Oberon13
Oct. 4, 2011, 06:44 PM
Yup...don't read anything in parentheses, and read everything AS WRITTEN for each movement only once. So, for such a mouthful (and there are some mouthfuls at second level and up as well with the walk turn on haunches/pirouettes), start early! And just read straight through it clearly.

You should stand at E or B, whichever is closest as you come in (or whichever is farthest away from any other dressage arena that may be set up next door or nearby). Start reading the first movement as soon as the judge rings the bell/blows the whistle. Then, just stay ahead of the rider a little bit.

I hope you and the kids have fun!!!

SaddleFitterVA
Oct. 4, 2011, 09:35 PM
I read what is written, watch the rider and for movements with little warning, I read "ahead" a bit, and for movements that are long, I pause until the rider is close to where she needs to execute the movement.

There is nothing at all about reading the entire block in one breath.

I figure when I'm reading for a friend, my job is to take away any nervousness about where to go in the test. :)

LaraNSpeedy
Oct. 8, 2011, 08:49 AM
Practice reading it aloud to them if you arent already. That is a mouthful but if you get them started and then blur through it annuciating (did I spell that right!?) the bits that the rider needs to hear....

I have said long walk instead of free walk before at a rec show and no one noticed. But why gamble? I did that by accident.

Velvet
Oct. 14, 2011, 12:17 PM
Wasn't there once a joke organization called the US Test Callers Association (USTCA)? Dang. It was funny, but it did have some real advice.

walktrot
Oct. 14, 2011, 12:40 PM
Wasn't there once a joke organization called the US Test Callers Association (USTCA)? Dang. It was funny, but it did have some real advice.

I would join in a minute!

Thanks to all who replied. Some good advice.

Valentina_32926
Oct. 14, 2011, 03:37 PM
I've been reading for quite a while now for casual local barn schooling shows. At some point the kids will be moving up to a "real" show sponsored by the local organization. A few of them are working hard at memorizing their tests, but we always give them the option of having them read.

I'm wondering if there are rules or regulations for reading. Specifically, do you literally read exactly what is on the form? I'm thinking about a couple of movements in Intro C and Training that say something along the lines of "A circle right 20 meters developing working canter in the first quarter of the circle, right lead. Before A working trot rising." Quite a mouthful. Can that be abbreviated?

I enjoy reading and have been told I'm quite good at it. Just want to make sure I do it right.

Thanks!

At a recognized show I read it as ""A circle right 20 meters developing working canter in the first quarter of the circle". If someone says you have to state everyword just make the unnecessary words much softer (be certain the rider knows you're planning to do this). Also, in the above example, as they hit as "A" I would be saying the "developing working canter" part - you can hestitate between the instruction to help time things better for the rider so that you don't say it too early.

Arizona DQ
Oct. 14, 2011, 05:36 PM
Great! I have to teach my husband how to read the tests for me.....:eek: