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View Full Version : Hurricane preparation: what would you do differently next time?



kcmel
Aug. 29, 2011, 09:35 AM
Just wondering what you learned. We were well-prepared for what we got, but didn't really have a contigency plan for the nearby tornado warnings. Next time I will put ID on the horses (as suggested) as they would have had to have left the barn to go into a pasture if a tornado had actually headed our way.

grayarabpony
Aug. 29, 2011, 10:09 AM
I put breakaway halters on the horses with my name, cell phone number and address written on them in permanent ink.

Daydream Believer
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:47 PM
I would not count on your generator working and would fill up more water tubs than We did. We lost our power and the generator did not work right... Some circuit went bad. Another thought is to have parts on hand to repair a generator.

ddb
Aug. 29, 2011, 03:54 PM
Cut the grass. I did intend too, but this storm came in 12 hours earlier than expected. With everything else needing done it was my last thing to do and just ran out of time.

Now I have leaves everywhere. Saw another thread about red maple leave and thought well we are surrounded by woods and who knows what kind they are and where they came from.

Next storm grass gets cut so the leaves can blow on by!!

kcmel
Aug. 29, 2011, 03:55 PM
In that same vein, if you don't use your bathtub--check it to make sure the drain is tight. Mine was leaky so I had to rig something up.

Hinderella
Aug. 29, 2011, 04:07 PM
Take out more cash & set it aside. I don't carry much cash, normally, but when the power goes out, you need cash for those stores/suppliers that do open with generators.

Buy some camp lamps or oil lamps. We had plenty of flashlights & candles, but they don't throw a lot of light for those long, dark evenings. Or maybe a headlamp for reading!

Tom King
Aug. 29, 2011, 05:09 PM
I had a spare carbuerator for the generator, which was good, but I hadn't checked to see that it would bolt right on. It took a half hour to get the pressed in right angle fuel inlet out to press in the straight one that we needed for our model. We hadn't used it since Isabel, and even though I had run the fuel out of it, the old carb was clogged.

We fueled, oiled, and sharpened the chainsaws, but I didn't fill the tractor and it ran out while I was pushing the last tree out of the road right after it went through. No one in our neighboring developments could get out. I knew it was close, and just as I was pushing the last three out of the road that had probably 20 families blocked in, the tractor gave me warning by the way it was running that I had the choice of moving the tree out of the road, running it completely out of fuel, or driving it over to the side of the road and not have to bleed the lines. I chose to move the tree, walked home and got Pam to come pull me back to the house with the truck. I knew I didn't have any fuel at home either. We bled the lines today after I went and bought some fuel.

So next time, EVERYTHING gets topped off.

fivehorses
Aug. 29, 2011, 07:35 PM
I would rent plenty of movies, since it got stressful listening to the 'weather'.

I don't know why I thought of this, but I'd make coffee to drink as in iced coffee. I just had a craving and thought it would be hard to make if electric went out, which it did.
I have a generator, but thought, now if I had an iced coffee, it would help motiavate me.

I did fill up tubs, had extra buckets of water on hand.
Also, topped off all vehicles, and had plenty of gas on hand for the generator.

I felt pretty prepared, but then again, it was really just a rainstorm here.
Vermont is in sorry shape. Some roads in my town are washed out.
I can always ride a horse thru the woods and trails if need be to get to town, or take the atv if feeling lazy.

I feel lucky that we had it easy. But, next storm...its going to be movie time for me.

carolprudm
Aug. 30, 2011, 06:41 AM
We have been through David Fran Isabel and Ivan and probably some I have forgotten so we have the system down pat. Also Agnes but we didn't have a farm then

I need to weatherstrip the garage door on the hay barn though. Water got in under the door and it would have been a disaster if I had more than 200 bales in there.

We have a whole house generator that self tests weekly. :)

Before we installed that we had a portable generator but also used power inverters. They are not particularly expensive and will run off a diesel tractor or even a spare car battery. My daughter keeps marine fish tanks and they can't go long at all without power. She would keep a charged battery in her apartment for emergencies recharging it with a battery charger after use.

judybigredpony
Aug. 30, 2011, 07:24 AM
Not a thing, we had ice in freezer, cooler cleaned and sitting right there, fuel in everything, if it held water it was full and in wash stall, every pasture had filled trougths and sheds packed w/ alfalfa, herds sorted to be drama free. Barn horses left out until last minute double bedded stalls, bought extra feed, closed windows on windy side, cleaned gutters put extensions on down spouts to keep water away fro all buildings, hired skid loader to tweek drive buidl water diverson berms, took jump rails up and stored, took anything that would fly in and stored, trash cans put in garage, dumpsters end of drive pulled up into trees, took solar lught off driveway, put all potted and hanging plants in safe place. we took 2 days to prep 30 acres 18 horses 6 dogs and 11 cats (barn cats0.
I charged my kindle, bought mag's, newspaers, charge computer batteries, I washed all our laundry and cleaned the house. We found those big tubs you use for storage fit in bath well filled w/ water and set a pitcher by each. w/ three bathrooms 2 people were felt prepared. Put double wick candles in bathrooms w/ lighter, and boxes of generic wet ones. I cleaned the little pool and chlorined the water. after a clean up day of chain sawing had a place for a quick dip n soap up. Gas for grill filled and grill ready food bought. Probably the most prepared I've ever been. Today dumped massive amounts of water down the drains, but no flooded stalls, no wet anything. Just alot of bottled water in garage and 9lbs of ice still left. Some fence lines still to clear bur everyone and everything came thru in tip top shape.....

ddb
Aug. 30, 2011, 10:43 AM
No really prep, but I see people draging lawn sweepers around picking up leaves. I want one and will try to get one before next time. I'm in the process of trying to pick them up and keep reminding the horses goats eat leaves...horses eat grass. Go figure plenty of nice grass and they are trying to beat me to the leaves.

jawa
Aug. 30, 2011, 05:30 PM
Get cattle ear tags at the feed store and write the following on tags:

1. Horse's name
2. Your name
3. Best phone/contact number
4. Vet/Clinic name and number

The ear tags can be zip tied to a halter, and as our vet recommended, braided into the mane in case halters break/come off.

The tags come in a variety of sizes and colors and a sharpie works great on them.

As a bonus, I used the extra tags in the bag to label the sheets and blankets so I know which belongs to which horse.


ETA: I would put home and cell #'s on tags. Our home phone is not working, but cell are. During Isabel our cell didn't work, but the land line did.

mildot
Aug. 30, 2011, 05:40 PM
Not a thing, we had ice in freezer, cooler cleaned and sitting right there, fuel in everything, if it held water it was full and in wash stall, every pasture had filled trougths and sheds packed w/ alfalfa, herds sorted to be drama free. Barn horses left out until last minute double bedded stalls, bought extra feed, closed windows on windy side, cleaned gutters put extensions on down spouts to keep water away fro all buildings, hired skid loader to tweek drive buidl water diverson berms, took jump rails up and stored, took anything that would fly in and stored, trash cans put in garage, dumpsters end of drive pulled up into trees, took solar lught off driveway, put all potted and hanging plants in safe place. we took 2 days to prep 30 acres 18 horses 6 dogs and 11 cats (barn cats0.
I charged my kindle, bought mag's, newspaers, charge computer batteries, I washed all our laundry and cleaned the house. We found those big tubs you use for storage fit in bath well filled w/ water and set a pitcher by each. w/ three bathrooms 2 people were felt prepared. Put double wick candles in bathrooms w/ lighter, and boxes of generic wet ones. I cleaned the little pool and chlorined the water. after a clean up day of chain sawing had a place for a quick dip n soap up. Gas for grill filled and grill ready food bought. Probably the most prepared I've ever been. Today dumped massive amounts of water down the drains, but no flooded stalls, no wet anything. Just alot of bottled water in garage and 9lbs of ice still left. Some fence lines still to clear bur everyone and everything came thru in tip top shape.....
Impressive!

Horse with No Name
Aug. 30, 2011, 06:47 PM
Not a thing, we had ice in freezer, cooler cleaned and sitting right there, fuel in everything, if it held water it was full and in wash stall, every pasture had filled trougths and sheds packed w/ alfalfa, herds sorted to be drama free. Barn horses left out until last minute double bedded stalls, bought extra feed, closed windows on windy side, cleaned gutters put extensions on down spouts to keep water away fro all buildings, hired skid loader to tweek drive buidl water diverson berms, took jump rails up and stored, took anything that would fly in and stored, trash cans put in garage, dumpsters end of drive pulled up into trees, took solar lught off driveway, put all potted and hanging plants in safe place. we took 2 days to prep 30 acres 18 horses 6 dogs and 11 cats (barn cats0.
I charged my kindle, bought mag's, newspaers, charge computer batteries, I washed all our laundry and cleaned the house. We found those big tubs you use for storage fit in bath well filled w/ water and set a pitcher by each. w/ three bathrooms 2 people were felt prepared. Put double wick candles in bathrooms w/ lighter, and boxes of generic wet ones. I cleaned the little pool and chlorined the water. after a clean up day of chain sawing had a place for a quick dip n soap up. Gas for grill filled and grill ready food bought. Probably the most prepared I've ever been. Today dumped massive amounts of water down the drains, but no flooded stalls, no wet anything. Just alot of bottled water in garage and 9lbs of ice still left. Some fence lines still to clear bur everyone and everything came thru in tip top shape.....

Yep, that's pretty impressive all right. It's unlikely I will ever have to be in a hurricane or big storm (the weather here is relatively drama free thank goodness!) but if so I want to be this prepared.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Aug. 30, 2011, 07:26 PM
Next storm grass gets cut so the leaves can blow on by!!

I learned something similar from Hurricane Floyd - be sure to get the honeysuckle and morning glory vines off the fence. If you don't, when the ground gets saturated and the wind can't blow through your fence? Yeah. It will topple over.

cowgirljenn
Aug. 30, 2011, 07:29 PM
I wasn't in this one - but from previous experience:

Have a generator that can run your well. And make sure your well is wired up such that it can be run into your generator (and isn't hard-line wired into your house).

Have plenty of gas for said generator.

Make sure the people you are evacuating to know it may not be just a few days. :) (And make sure you know/understand that, too!)

Now I've forgotten the other ones...a rgh. :)

fivehorses
Aug. 30, 2011, 08:27 PM
I want to add, that the people in Vermont who are stranded certainly weren't included in the warnings, and even if they were...they were talking today that it could be weeks to months before bridges and roads will be repaired. They are hoping they can put in an emergency road into some of these towns for emergency use only. Its really just awfully devastating. They think it will take a long time to repair.
Vermont is mountains with valleys with rivers and towns. So imagine the rivers surrounding your town taking out the roads....you can't get out or in for that matter.
They are bringing in emergency supplies by helicopter.

I don't think anyone can be prepared for that. I think quite a few folk are going to have to relocate. Its really a crisis there.

ReSomething
Aug. 30, 2011, 09:26 PM
I want to add, that the people in Vermont who are stranded certainly weren't included in the warnings, and even if they were...


I don't think anyone can be prepared for that. I think quite a few folk are going to have to relocate. Its really a crisis there.

I recall that one of the towns I have lived in had been cut off for weeks some years before we lived there and the townspeople had gotten together using the Grange and the Volunteer Fire Department and created a disaster preparedness plan for the next time this happened. There was a lot of money in this town and many retired professionals so the money was there and the desire and the expertise, and access to the commercial fishing fleet and at least a dozen large boats with big generators capable of running shore operations, desalinators and the ability to head off to points elsewhere and bring stuff back. But this was an unusual case.

More likely is like where we bought our house - we were at the end of a canyon with no way out and no ability to get fuel or food if the river flooded the town and took out the bridge and the main drag at a couple of critical locations. We were pretty prepared to tough it out but as far as getting to work and having an income - not going to happen. There were alternate routes that you could use on foot or with a motorcycle but if the river took out certain critical spots on the main road you'd be days hiking out of there.

philosoraptor
Aug. 31, 2011, 12:20 AM
I was really happy with everything. I had 4 days water stored up and I was only without power 10 hours. I had everyone in a special pen, and I was up half the night checking them every hour; everyone was fine. I spent this summer finally fixing the grading & drainage around the barn, so water vanished as soon as it ran towards the barn. I parked my vehicles away from big trees, and no vehicle was damaged. Horses had breakaway halters & all horses are chipped just in case. No injuries, loose horses, or problems. I am so glad I had days to prepare!

In a perfect world I would say not have big trees right along a fenceline, because those trees tend to fall and damage fencing. But horses were not out when it happened. And the damage is not the end of the world. Trees can fall in any storm; it doesn't take a hurricane.

I know some people are gung-ho over generators. But, although I didn't have power overnight, I still have $2k - $4k in my bank account (cost to have a properly sized one installed). My friend bragged hers up, and it sounded great until I found out it takes up to 3 gallons of propane an hour and doesn't run the whole house. Sorry, it's just not a priority for me.

I am grateful my family, pets, and horses were not hurt. No damage was done to house or barn. Overall, I felt like with all the notice we had plus good information online, I was well prepared.

MMPM
Aug. 31, 2011, 09:15 AM
While we were well prepared at my place, with extra water and everything put away etc.... Horses, house, and barn faired very well no damage.

While I thank God everyone is Ok, we are going on Day 5 with no power in western Morris County NJ. Water is starting to run low, but I can drive and refill 5 gallon jugs if needed.

I am currently on a quest for a standby generator. I would like it to run my well and one refrigerator. I mind you I live 60 miles from NYC, on a county road, not the middle of nowhere. 5 days and not one repair truck seen!

In our area when we lose power it will typically take 12 to 24 hrs to be restored. So it will not be a waste of money, I was always on the fence about spending the money on a generator, but now I regret not doing it!

I will have one installed in the next month!

msj
Aug. 31, 2011, 01:16 PM
What has always amazed me are the people that have generators but don't check that they run with any frequency. :(

In early March of 1991 we had a hell of an ice storm in the area that took down most power lines and therefore NO electricity and I'm totally electric. No lights, no water therefore not able to even flush a toilet. I was fortunate that I had power back within 60 hrs but walking over to a neighbor's pond to get water for the horses and to flush a toilet was no fun. I had closed on the farm in spring of 1990 and had been building a barn and fencing the property. I did think about getting a generator but the idea went by the wayside and was kinda forgotten.

After the storm was over, I had commercial electricians get me a generator and to wire everything so I was never without power again (as long as I had gas for the generator that is). It's 7000 watts and the electricians said I can't run my hot water tank and my clothes dryer at the same time everything else is running but if I need hot water I'd just shut everything else down for a couple of hrs for it to heat up. I've never needed to use it since as we've only had 2 serious power outages that lasted less than 4 hrs but I've loaned it out to friends when a microburst went through the area several yrs ago for a wk till they got power back.

I have run that damned generator religiously twice/month since 1991 and if there is a problem, and there has been, it gets shipped off to the mechanic that does my tractor immediately. Just ran it two days ago for 40 minutes and will run it before the middle of next month for sure. Just like putting on the calendar when to give the dog heartworm meds, I put starting and running the generator on the calendar and every time I do run it, I hope I never ever need it. Can you tell I'm of the "I'd rather be safe than sorry type"?

Burbank
Aug. 31, 2011, 01:44 PM
make sure that my husband spray paints the CORRECT phone number on the horse (this was a few years ago)

JSwan
Aug. 31, 2011, 10:43 PM
I learn something every hurricane season. What I learn is that my plans are not as perfect as I like to think they are. Relying too much on the forecast, waiting to the last minute to move animals to high ground, that sort of thing.

I don't worry so much about the winds. That will take out the fence or power. But especially with a slow moving storm....... The real danger is the rain. What happened in the NE was what I was worried about happening here (it has before). The flooding happens so fast, and the further downstream you are the worse it is. Very difficult to implement emergency plans when your farm is suddenly under four feet of water.

fivehorses
Aug. 31, 2011, 11:09 PM
I am on a hill, so I don't worry about 'flooding' per se. I did check all my culverts and raked out leaves or any debris.

I had bathtubs with water, ran the generator before the storm, had candles, and flashlights at the ready, spare batteries, picked up all loose objects, shut barn windows, basically did all I could.

It blew over so to speak, but I am glad I did what I should have.

The people in VT...I mean they don't get hurricanes, and they never were in the 'warning' area.

I got very proactive when I looked at the storm's path and saw it run right thru my farm(which it went very west of eventually).

You can take steps to prepare, but if I was in a flood type area or if my barns were not so well built, I would try to evacuate.

It was an ice storm and no power that encouraged me to buy a generator. I had the electrician hook up a power outlet that I hook it into. It runs my furnace,bedroom, kitchen, water and a few other rooms. It was a 1,000 vs a whole house generator was 5,000. I haven't needed it yet, but who cares, it will be there when I do.

There are many here in NH too still without power.
At least its very nice weather...not too hot, not freezing.

I still would rent lots of movies!

Maythehorsebewithme
Aug. 31, 2011, 11:55 PM
A couple of minor useful hints:

Coleman makes a retro-looking lantern that runs on D batteries and throws a lot of light. Can be hung up easily, on a tack hook for example. Also have a few headlamps, which are useful as they free up your hands.

If you have advance notice of a storm, you can turn your freezers to the lowest setting. (You might have the freezers set at not the lowest setting to save energy.) The colder the stuff is, the longer to thaw, buys you some time.

ms raven
Sep. 1, 2011, 12:08 AM
Thankfully I have no experience with hurricanes and probably never will but read that other good ways to ID your horses is to write your phone number on their hooves with a sharpie or braid contact information into their mane or tail.

carolprudm
Sep. 1, 2011, 08:07 AM
What has always amazed me are the people that have generators but don't check that they run with any frequency. :(



My generator has a self timer. It runs a self test every Sunday evening.

LUVVVV my Generac generator

mpsbarnmanager
Sep. 1, 2011, 02:38 PM
I would not assume the generator will start. DH messed with it for 2 hours friday night and it would not start. We had just used it maybe a month ago and it was fine.:confused: Sunday night he messed with it again (power went out 4 am sat) and bypassed some fuel switch or something and it started right up.

He works on base at Oceana and some guy returned a "defective" Generac generator that he paid $1100 for a few days before. DH fixed whatever simple problem it had and asked the manager how much for the "broken" generator that was returned so he got a new $1100 generator for $300!!:yes: Score! Now the barn and house both have a generator.

I also would have gotten a few camping lanterns. It sucks to try to clean stalls and hold a flashlight at the same time.

Other than that I don't think there is anything I would have done different.

mpsbarnmanager
Sep. 1, 2011, 02:40 PM
make sure that my husband spray paints the CORRECT phone number on the horse (this was a few years ago)

Story please!!:lol:

oliverreed
Sep. 1, 2011, 03:51 PM
A question: How does one tactfully suggest to one's BO that she REALLY needs to be more prepared for events like Irene? Horses got so low on water that it had to be hauled in - by boarders. How does one suggest that a generator might be a really useful thing for BO to have at the barn?

msj
Sep. 1, 2011, 04:28 PM
My generator has a self timer. It runs a self test every Sunday evening.

LUVVVV my Generac generator

Carolprudm-I'm not talking about those generators. They do 'generally' work because they are run on a regular basis. I'm talking the stand alone generators. Hell, If they had the ones that ran like that in 1991 after our ice storm I most certainly would have gotten one rather than the stand alone ones but they didn't have them back then. My neighbor got one of those a few yrs ago so if for some reason we had a lengthy power outage and I couldn't get my generator started, I'd just go to his place and get buckets of water for the horses and dog and myself. Those generators also run either on gas or propane I believe and that would mean installing a tank since I'm total electric. My neighbor is propane so his was much less to install.

Montanas_Girl
Sep. 1, 2011, 07:57 PM
I want to add, that the people in Vermont who are stranded certainly weren't included in the warnings, and even if they were...they were talking today that it could be weeks to months before bridges and roads will be repaired.

The big Nashville/middle TN flood was more than two years ago, and there are still many roads, bridges, and houses that are not yet fully repaired. I feel for the people of Vermont - floods are terrifyingly powerful.

katarine
Sep. 1, 2011, 08:20 PM
A question: How does one tactfully suggest to one's BO that she REALLY needs to be more prepared for events like Irene? Horses got so low on water that it had to be hauled in - by boarders. How does one suggest that a generator might be a really useful thing for BO to have at the barn?

You willin' to help tote the note on that :) ?

Every barn, every home, every one has to balance risk. I'm not sure I've seen a generator anywhere in any barn in 30 years of horses. It's a nice idea- but how often do you need one?

incentive
Sep. 1, 2011, 08:43 PM
Start packing earlier.

Wash the clothes that are in the hamper.

I second the suggestions to cut the grass and to make sure the generator actually runs.

Get out the Dyson and capture the corgi hair tumble weed.

Burbank
Sep. 1, 2011, 08:55 PM
mps, when we lived out in eastern NC we debated what to do with the horse, leave him in the old barn, turn him out

we decided to open the barn door that was attached to the pasture and let him decide but due to the trees by the fence line we wanted a way to ID our horse so instead of leaving a halter and tag on him we spray painted our number on his side

well after the hurricane the horse and fence were fine but on closer inspection we saw that the number spray painted on our horse was not our number, we still laugh thinking if he got lose some poor person getting calls going "that's not my horse!"

on another note, I would make sure that there was plenty of gas in the car instead of thinking "I can just get some later"

msj
Sep. 1, 2011, 09:01 PM
You willin' to help tote the note on that :) ?

Every barn, every home, every one has to balance risk. I'm not sure I've seen a generator anywhere in any barn in 30 years of horses. It's a nice idea- but how often do you need one?

If the barns have run the electric lines from the house to the barn like I did, you aren't going to see a generator in the barn. Mine's in the garage where the power comes to the house from the road and that's were the electricians did the wiring for me. All I do is turn the power from the road off so there's no power surge when it does go back on, plug the generator into another 'box' and then pull that switch. As I said earlier, I just can't run the hot water heater or clothes dryer while I'm running everything else in the house, barn and well. If I need hot water, I just turn off a few of the other circuits. I hope I never need it, but if I do, I'll have power and won't have to worry. :)

katarine
Sep. 1, 2011, 09:07 PM
I understand how that works msj, I do...but in all my years I don't know of a single barn that would have been served by a generator whether in the house, the garage, up a tree LOL- anywhere- so while you do- IMO- JMO- most don't. That is the sum total of what I said.

This would be a fab discussion topic for any barn: What's our emergency power plan if the power is out for , let's say...5 days?

I'll be happily wrong if I'm wrong, it's all good.

msj
Sep. 1, 2011, 09:45 PM
I understand how that works msj, I do...but in all my years I don't know of a single barn that would have been served by a generator whether in the house, the garage, up a tree LOL- anywhere- so while you do- IMO- JMO- most don't. That is the sum total of what I said.

This would be a fab discussion topic for any barn: What's our emergency power plan if the power is out for , let's say...5 days?

I'll be happily wrong if I'm wrong, it's all good.

katarine, I can tell you that our ice storm in '91 lasted almost 2 complete wks for some people and you couldn't get a generator anywhere for love or money after the first day. Heck I remember there was a lottery going at work and the person to get their power on last would win! :D It was early March and in western NY, it's still damn cold so a generator wouldn't JUST be for a barn to have lights and well water, but for anyone in a home as well to have heat, keep the freezer and stove running etc.

Just the fact that some companies are selling the automatic generators mentioned earlier should tell you that there is a demand for on site automatic generators. If you've followed any of the national news about the areas still without power after Irene it's because the national grid is quite antiquated. That should give anyone listening a valid reason to make sure they had either the automatic generators or a stand alone one just in case.....

katarine
Sep. 1, 2011, 10:05 PM
You're absolutely right. I live in AL, we're 3.5 hrs inland from Gulf Shores...Me speeka da hurricane. Irene was a walk in the park compared to some of what I've seen...

msj
Sep. 1, 2011, 10:17 PM
You're absolutely right. I live in AL, we're 3.5 hrs inland from Gulf Shores...Me speeka da hurricane. Irene was a walk in the park compared to some of what I've seen...

Believe me, you can keep all the hurricanes and tornadoes down there. I have a brother in Huntsville, AL so I know of what kind of weather you have down there and just as he doesn't want to deal with snow and ice, I don't want to deal with hurricanes, tornadoes and humidity. :)

jazzrider
Sep. 1, 2011, 10:42 PM
I haven't read everybody's responses, but I'll just add that the best thing we did was after "Snowmageddon" in 2010 we sat down and wrote out an emergency plan, accounting for longer term power outages, inability to leave the farm, inability to get horses out, road blockage, flooding or 4 foot snows, damage, etc. It was the smartest thing we did. I keep it in a binder in the barn along with my barn routine notes for barn help, and medical log.

I opened it up a few days before Irene, ran down the check list, made preparations, and felt pretty confident going into things.

With each weather incident that's come along, I've added notes. It makes me feel good to know that if for some reason I can't be there, I can direct someone to that book and know they'll have the info they need to prepare the best they can.

Lady Counselor
Sep. 2, 2011, 01:22 PM
I was in pretty good shape going into Irene. I prepared for a wind event with power loss, so the gennie was primed and ready to go with four fuel cans filled and waiting. The vehicle were all stored and the horses all came into the main barn, two in temp stalls in the alley. We are on town water, but I filled all the outside tanks just in case.
Then the usual, food, cleaned up, laundry and dishes done, etc, inside.
I never lost power. I did, however, see our tiny brook turn into a river that was damn close to taking out the banks, which were all over 20' from my home. That's when I realized I had no real plan for flooding in place. And I was there alone with all the animals, and no truck. (husband had it down at the airport)
So, I learned that you don't let the truck leave the grounds.
Contact neighbor up the road for emergency pasture or barn if needed.
Keep all crates for small animals there and ready to go.

hightide
Sep. 2, 2011, 01:28 PM
More water stored up! We have a well and it was 5 days of no power here (just got it back an hour ago) and we had to make several trips to the grocery store for more water, even though we filled up 5 (new) trash cans for the horses alone.

Chief2
Sep. 2, 2011, 01:30 PM
A question: How does one tactfully suggest to one's BO that she REALLY needs to be more prepared for events like Irene? Horses got so low on water that it had to be hauled in - by boarders. How does one suggest that a generator might be a really useful thing for BO to have at the barn?

You may not need to. Our town will drop off a tank with 900 gallons of potable water to any farm that requests it. When the tank is empty they will pick it up, and drop of another one that has been refilled. This will continue until your power is back up and running. The service is free. Have her ask about it at the town hall.

Leprechaun
Sep. 2, 2011, 02:14 PM
I would have tried to knock down as many apples as possible from the trees in the fields. We have fences around them and the horses only get a few normally but the shade is worth it. Anyway, the heavy winds blew them all over the fields, far, far away... We spend literally a full day out there getting them cleaned up so no one equine got ill. What a pain and many probably could have reasonably been knocked down.

I am well aware that this is trivial when compared to the tragic devastation that some have experienced. Central Mass was very lucky in the grand scheme of things. Jingles to all not as lucky!

alabama
Sep. 2, 2011, 11:15 PM
I bought a generator last winter and try to remember to start it and let it run for a while at least once a month. It's strong enough to run a (very) small heater, my fridge and a light.

I also have a well - a manual well. It's not fun but I can get water if I have to. I haven't had any of the water to drink yet. I need to take a sample to the heath dept. to make sure it's safe (it smells icky), but I could make do in a pinch. I have a coleman stove and propane. I can boil water. ;)

I do have break away halters with my numbers written on the leather parts. I use them only when bad weather is predicted.

I have some 15 gal. drums that I can fill in a pinch but I haven't done that yet.

shawneeAcres
Sep. 3, 2011, 05:07 PM
Luckily we were totally prepared, had a bad day but only lost power for one hour sat night! I had enough water filled up in extra tanks, buckets etc at the barn to handle the horses at least 2 - 3 days, topped off ALL water troughs, filled up all the vehicles, had 7 bags ice in the freezer, bought a lot of bottled water, had batteries for flashlights and laterns, and plenty of candles and bathtub filled with water! lso had picked EVERYTHING up at the barn and had all the jumps laying down, I didn't even lose flowers out of floers boxes as I put them under the judges tand beside the ring! The only thing I REALLY want to get is a generator, which we don't have. Chainsaw was ready to go Sunday AM when we went out and spent the whole morning picking up limbs and trees and too 7 overflowing pickup truckloads of wood and branches back tot he burn pile. The only trees that can fall into out pastures (limbs) were pecan and oak, neither of which wil cause problems with horses, but we got them all up first thing Sunday AM regardless. Horses were fine thru it all and altho we lost some shingles and had part of our packhouse roof blown off, we were VERY lucky!!!