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poltroon
Aug. 28, 2011, 05:30 PM
Not only is it invasive, but DH is allergic and this year we had a bumper crop. It's a lost cause for this year, but I need a plan for next year.

DH was even willing to consider goats if they will eat it. I tried to google, but all I got was recipes for goat meat in mint sauce. Which I'm sure is delicious, but not a solution to my particular problem unless the goat can be pre-marinated with the mint. :lol:

kinnip
Aug. 28, 2011, 05:34 PM
If you had a bumper crop this year, you'll have a whole van crop next year. Goats on the whole, do not love mint. Poultry doesn't like mint leaves, but I have found that they love to eat the rhizomes. If you want it gone, turn some birdies loose on it.

Chaila
Aug. 28, 2011, 07:17 PM
If life gives you mint, make Mojitos!

coloredhorse
Aug. 28, 2011, 07:45 PM
My pinto mare adores mint; if you weren't on the wrong coast, I'd consider hiring her out to you. :winkgrin:

MeghanDACVA
Aug. 28, 2011, 08:05 PM
Cats like mint. But not enough to graze it down ;-)

Alagirl
Aug. 28, 2011, 08:05 PM
haha, we had a horse that went nuts over mint :lol:

you will have to weed it.

Ask a local restaurant or whatnot I suppose...

HGem
Aug. 28, 2011, 08:46 PM
If life gives you mint, make Mojitos!

:yes:

Alagirl
Aug. 28, 2011, 09:07 PM
If life gives you mint, make Mojitos!

and Julips?

2tempe
Aug. 28, 2011, 09:08 PM
A Post I found on the internet: Sounds like you have a multi-step project, but I'd sure dig a bunch BEFORE next year...

"The only sure way is to dig it out root by root. Dig whenever you see a new
sprig poking out. If that is not acceptable and Roundup is too expensive
for you; go to your local hardware and get a bottle of industrial strength
ammonia (10% NH4OH). Pour some of it into a dropper bottle with a couple
drops of dish detergent and sprinkle the mint sprigs as they come up. The
extremely high nitrogen will burn the plants down to the main root. Keep at
it and you will finally kill it all. Maybe a little digging will be
required but not much. The only thing to remember is to have any wind to
your back."

Mozart
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:10 AM
Sorry to be a downer on this but my mother for some reason planted a bunch of mint in my garden oh..about 14 year ago..and I am still pulling it out.

poltroon
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:41 AM
It is already past the point where pulling one by one is practical or possible. I was told Roundup was not going to be successful against mint.

lolita1
Aug. 29, 2011, 06:53 AM
OMG I love mint I can't believe it is actually a weed where you live. Good luck with your issue.

WildBlue
Aug. 29, 2011, 07:47 AM
We've had some success with mowing the snot out of it. Seems to slow it down a little and encourages the grass to grow. We have several minty acres along the creek (I'm pretty sure some got washed down and took root) and don't want to lose more! I have some broadleaf herbicide I've been meaning to test on it.

I tried the mojito/julip idea at first but, even with friends helping, we were sadly unsuccessful. And to think I used to love mint.

Belg
Aug. 29, 2011, 08:31 AM
Allergic to mint? What a horrible, horrible tragedy. I'm rather fond of the Julep plan myself... and that path is singularly unavailable to one allergic.

poltroon
Aug. 29, 2011, 10:08 AM
We've had some success with mowing the snot out of it. Seems to slow it down a little and encourages the grass to grow. We have several minty acres along the creek (I'm pretty sure some got washed down and took root) and don't want to lose more! I have some broadleaf herbicide I've been meaning to test on it.

I tried the mojito/julip idea at first but, even with friends helping, we were sadly unsuccessful. And to think I used to love mint.

When do you mow it, and how often?

WildBlue
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:01 PM
We mow as often as we can, and as short as we can with the brushhog. That probably equates to 4-5" tall, every few weeks. For a smaller area, I'd use the lawnmower (after the brushhog) to scalp the snot out of it all summer. If it can't get tall enough to leaf out properly, it will eventually give up.

I cultivate several kinds of mint in their own patches near the house and regular mowing keeps it from popping up in the yard (sending out runners to flower beds 10 ft away is a whole 'nother story).

poltroon
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:06 PM
Wildblue, I think that will have to be my strategy for next year. It's completely taken over one of the orchard sections. Before, there were patches there, which didn't bother me, but this year conditions were ideal for mint and now it's trying to take over the pastures.

We have so much mint that just walking around out there will make you minty fresh.

If you pick blackberries out there and eat some while picking (a requirement!), your sinuses are so overwhelmed by mint that there's a mint aftertaste to the berries!

After I mowed yesterday, I felt like I'd been to the dentist and I just reeked of the stuff.

goodpony
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:12 PM
Totally agree with the mowing it down---seems to be the only strategy that really works here---though Im now thinking some chickens might assist.

poltroon
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:14 PM
Our ducks ignore it, but I'm thinking I could put some chickens on it intensively in the spring. Even if they don't eat it, they'll trample it.

I'm going to need more chickens, though. Or perhaps more accurately, more chicken tractors. Maybe I have a use for those obnoxious bantam cockerels after all.

Simkie
Aug. 29, 2011, 12:19 PM
I made the incredibly stupid mistake of planting mint in my garden several years ago. No, I don't know what I was thinking. I had visions of mojitos, I think.

I've gotten it under control this year by weed wacking it down to the ground a few times and pulling up the sprouts when then ground is WET.

Does burning work for mint?

cowboymom
Aug. 29, 2011, 04:14 PM
my mom planted some along the back of the house and I love it-hardly anything grows successfully in my yard due to my goats, chickens, horses and cows but the mint is doing awesome! LOL it's green and doesn't need my help and nothing will eat it!

MMmmm mojitos!

CosMonster
Aug. 29, 2011, 10:32 PM
CosMonsters eat mint. Rumor has it that if they are working in an area where mint grows, they'll just chew on it all day as they go about their business. They're very rare, though, and are almost never seen in CA so not much help to you. ;)

On a more serious note, I have also heard that digging it out at the root is really the only way to eradicate it. My goats will nibble on it but not really eat it, and even our terrible rabbits don't really get into it.

rustbreeches
Aug. 29, 2011, 11:46 PM
No good ideas, but I am jealous, since my two attempts to get mint going here in arid CO were unsuccessful.

Simkie
Aug. 29, 2011, 11:57 PM
No good ideas, but I am jealous, since my two attempts to get mint going here in arid CO were unsuccessful.
Seriously? Are you way up past 10,000 feet or something? I had NO problems getting it going here in FTC. You are more than welcome to mine!!

poltroon
Aug. 30, 2011, 12:00 AM
No good ideas, but I am jealous, since my two attempts to get mint going here in arid CO were unsuccessful.

Shall I send you some seeds? I have plenty! :D

rustbreeches
Aug. 30, 2011, 12:05 AM
Shall I send you some seeds? I have plenty! :D

I wish! CO has been very hard on my East Coast green thumb:) The only thing I can keep alive are irises and tomatoes. My husband's inability to turn on a sprinkler when I go home for 3 weeks in the summer plays no small role!

poltroon
Aug. 30, 2011, 12:45 AM
I wish! CO has been very hard on my East Coast green thumb:) The only thing I can keep alive are irises and tomatoes. My husband's inability to turn on a sprinkler when I go home for 3 weeks in the summer plays no small role!

This mint survives every summer for 3 months or more without water and reseeds itself every year... It was very pretty two weeks ago, gorgeous pink flowers, but I was cursing them knowing that it's just a bribe to let them go to seed.

But, probably best not to send herbs of mass destruction out to unsuspecting ecosystems! :lol:

darkmoonlady
Aug. 30, 2011, 12:55 AM
Mmm make mint jelly it takes LOADS of mint. My best friend planted it out in front of her house, it grew to massive proportions. We made I think 24 jars of mint apple jelly that was delish but hardly made a dent in the mint bush. My mint just died because of the heat, despite watering regularly. It was in my really crappy soil though so not surprised.

danceronice
Aug. 30, 2011, 10:57 AM
Four-line beetles, but even they only slow it down (and you don't want them around because when then run out of mint they move on to the other garden plants.)

Round-Up is about all I can think of. Really, mints are almost impossible to kill.

jn4jenny
Aug. 30, 2011, 11:05 AM
Burning does nothing for mint. It grows right back. Pretty much the only thing I've seen work is to do some mowing + strafing rounds of Roundup, then throw down a ton of mulch and let the now-weakened mint attempt to grow through the mulch, then pull the mint up more easily because it's growing in loose mulch instead of thick soil. But that was on a single garden patch, not a whole yard.

Belg
Aug. 30, 2011, 11:07 AM
I've heard somwhere that a couple bottles of bourbon and a family reunion will knock it back significantly :=)

Hinderella
Aug. 30, 2011, 11:43 AM
I've always heard that sheep will eat mint. When my husband lived in Turkey they used to graze the lambs on mint becuase it was supposed to make them taste better.
Is there a way to mow it down and then cover it with an impermeable barrier, like that heavy plastic that they put down over silage rows?

alto
Aug. 30, 2011, 11:45 AM
As you mention orchard, be very cautious of Round Up application if you have peaches - I live in the area where RU was developed & tested for market, entire peach ochards were poisoned before soils were extensively retested & RU derivatives were found to be the culprit.

RU works best when new growth is ~4-6 inches & it's an active growth cycle, so you have maximum uptake of the glyphosate into the plant cells.
(ie early spring application is the most efficient)