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draftdriver
Aug. 23, 2011, 11:44 AM
I have about a quart of old gas/oil mix which has been sitting around for 4-5 years. I've recently had my chainsaw overhauled in preparation for cutting cedar logs for a fencing project. I don't want to use this old gas in it. How do I get rid of the old stuff? Spread it around on the dirt driveway and allow it to evaporate? Our rural area has only one hazardous waste day per year, and that's a month away. I need to be working on this project sooner than that.

Bluey
Aug. 23, 2011, 11:46 AM
Our fire department building has a recycling bin for old oils you can dispose of such stuff.
Why not ask them?

Many here did spread it on their driveway or cattleguards, works great as a week killer.
It is illegal now to do so here, so we don't any more.

Nes
Aug. 23, 2011, 12:05 PM
PLEASE take it to a proper waste disposal area!!

A new gas container is not expensive, hang on to the old stuff for another month and take it to the dump.

Bells
Aug. 23, 2011, 12:05 PM
Put it in an old glass jar and use it the next time you need to start an outdoor fire.

Bluey
Aug. 23, 2011, 12:07 PM
Put it in an old glass jar and use it the next time you need to start an outdoor fire.

:eek:

Nes
Aug. 23, 2011, 12:55 PM
:lol:

Bluey and I finally agree on something.

At least when you're putting it in your car you do that to accomplish something.

Don't you know about throwing gas on the fire? :dead:

Bells
Aug. 23, 2011, 05:26 PM
Don't throw it on a fire that is already going. Notice I didn't say dump it on a fire that already has a flame. Use it to START a fire.

Have you heard of BBQ starter - used on briquets? Old gas mixed w/oil can be safely and easily used to start fires. In fact when the gas is really old it doesn't always help to use it. Ask me how I know and somehow have survived to talk about it.

HalfArabian
Aug. 23, 2011, 09:27 PM
not sure about the fire idea, but when I had mixed "bad" fuel before a "shop" person took it for his Salomaner(sp) heater. Not sure if this would apply.

KH

Alagirl
Aug. 23, 2011, 10:36 PM
if it's not much you can probably get away with pouring it into the tank of a diesel machine (given that it's got more real diesel!)

short of that, recycling center...starting a fire with products like that is asking for trouble...

smokygirl
Aug. 23, 2011, 10:38 PM
ask a local car repair shop if they can dispose of it?

Foxtrot's
Aug. 23, 2011, 11:19 PM
You can spill a thin line of it in your arena and light it and school your horse over it!
(not).
That's what we did at a police horse training clinic. Seemed very dangerous to me thinking of the gas spreading around and exploding - but it soaked in and nothing happened except a few singed tails on those who did not tie them up.

CVPeg
Aug. 24, 2011, 09:20 AM
ask a local car repair shop if they can dispose of it?

Thanks for bringing this up -I have various and assorted small containers - one for each of ex's old tools that he never used - and I need to move them out of my shed, too. (And he sloppily wrote on everything (his and mine) with magic marker - couldn't be bothered using labels - when I still see his writing, it gets me mad...now my poor son is staying with him, and nothing sacred there, too... so son's stuff is kept with me! ;))

I believe I've heard, that here in New York at least, auto repair places are required to take discarded oil if requested - not sure about gas/oil mix. I'm going down to neighborhood garage today and see if it's true...

draftdriver
Aug. 24, 2011, 10:17 AM
ask a local car repair shop if they can dispose of it?

Great idea. I think I'll give that a try. Thanks.

fordtraktor
Aug. 24, 2011, 11:49 AM
Using it to start a brush fire is a fine idea but don't be an idiot and get yourself hurt. You have to put it on an unlit fire, then light a rag soaked with something slow-burning from a good distance (20 feet should be sufficient for the little bit you have) and throw the lit rag onto the gas-soaked pile. If it didn't flash, don't go near it and try again.

hosspuller
Aug. 24, 2011, 01:08 PM
Don't mix it with used oil. That will change the classification from used oil to hazardous waste. It is a bad thing to do... The gasoline lowers the flashpoint. There are many incidents of kero heaters burning out of control because of gasoline mixed into the kero.

I would use an empty veggy can ( about 14 oz) stuff a rag in it to serve as a wick. add some of the gas and light it. Put it on a surface outside that can take the heat. Unprotected Asphalt driveways will melt/stain. using a veggy can keeps the volume of flame and fuel small. The wick controls the burn rate and you don't have to ignite vapors... should burn for about 1/2 hour. More rag out of the can = bigger flame

Guin
Aug. 24, 2011, 02:43 PM
I'd just wait til recycling day.

Bells
Aug. 24, 2011, 09:44 PM
Glad to hear that I'm not the only one that has managed to start a fire w/old gas and have survived. Old gas mixed w/oil is not quite as explosive as new gas.

bird4416
Aug. 24, 2011, 09:50 PM
You can spill a thin line of it in your arena and light it and school your horse over it!
(not).
That's what we did at a police horse training clinic. Seemed very dangerous to me thinking of the gas spreading around and exploding - but it soaked in and nothing happened except a few singed tails on those who did not tie them up.

I did a bomb proofing clinic with my horse and we did the same thing. I was surprised how nonchalant my horse was about the fire. He walked right over it like it was nothing. The smoke bomb was a whole lot scarier.

Everythingbutwings
Aug. 25, 2011, 08:01 AM
if it's not much you can probably get away with pouring it into the tank of a diesel machine (given that it's got more real diesel!)

short of that, recycling center...starting a fire with products like that is asking for trouble...

Sounds like a good way to ruin your diesel machine.

Check this discussion on The Discovery Channel:

"Can anyone enlighten me and would this opportunity to (blow vehicles up ) (http://community.yourdiscovery.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/95010646/m/716108752)conduct a suitable experiment in the name of science interest someone?"

Hilary
Aug. 25, 2011, 05:53 PM
I also use my old fuel to start my brush pile burn. Do NOT throw it on a burning fire.

coloredcowhorse
Aug. 27, 2011, 08:03 PM
Depending on how much of it is oil and how much is gas.....put a bag of construction sand into a 5 gallon bucket, pour this mix over it and use it to clean/oil your shovels, hoes etc. If it is mostly gas this won't work as it will evaporate but if there's a fair amount of oil in it it will make a nice material for cleaning and protecting these tools from rust.

Alagirl
Aug. 27, 2011, 10:27 PM
Depending on how much of it is oil and how much is gas.....put a bag of construction sand into a 5 gallon bucket, pour this mix over it and use it to clean/oil your shovels, hoes etc. If it is mostly gas this won't work as it will evaporate but if there's a fair amount of oil in it it will make a nice material for cleaning and protecting these tools from rust.

yep, good idea, too...

stolen virtue
Aug. 27, 2011, 10:32 PM
Please, plaese dispose of it properly. Contact your fire department or health department. I help clients clean up contaminated sites and it is way cheaper to dispose of it legally.

Rabtfarm
Aug. 28, 2011, 05:15 PM
As stolen virtue says, please dispose of this properly. DO NOT use it for salamander heating, hollywood horse stunts, diesel engines, starting fires cleaning shovels, storing in glass or pouring it on asphalt as my old neighbor did(gasoline dissolves pavement).
We are talking about $1.25 worth of old fuel...something that is not worth losing your barn, your diesel anything, your horse or your life for.

Captain, Wildwood Volunteer Fire company(retired).

Alagirl
Aug. 28, 2011, 05:20 PM
As stolen virtue says, please dispose of this properly. DO NOT use it for salamander heating, hollywood horse stunts, diesel engines, starting fires cleaning shovels, storing in glass or pouring it on asphalt as my old neighbor did(gasoline dissolves pavement).
We are talking about $1.25 worth of old fuel...something that is not worth losing your barn, your diesel anything, your horse or your life for.

Captain, Wildwood Volunteer Fire company(retired).


well, a diesel can handle small amounts of gasoline in the fuel. Emphasis is on small. Naturally, fancier diesels are more tender...
Putting a splash of gas in the diesel has been a way to improve viscosity in cold weather.