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galloping-gourmet
Aug. 19, 2011, 07:04 PM
We have 2 areas fenced with electric fencing. the first original was new zealand fencing (I think that's what you call it) - really strong wire, which is good and bad. I've had 4 horses cut their legs pretty badly over the 6 yrs we've had it.

We added another area to it and used tape instead of the wire, and have changed it out to the white rope wire.

Problem - the solar charger seems to have stopped working, so we got an electric charger, but somewhere there must be a short as it's not working either. the young/baby horses walk right through the rope and get out. So, we'll keep working on it, but it is scary to me, thinking they could get out in the middle of the night..

What type of fencing do you all find the most effective? Thanks so much.

GoForAGallop
Aug. 19, 2011, 07:09 PM
I love my no-climb. Expensive? Heck yes. (Although less if you don't use the stuff specifically marketed for horses...I used fencing with the same 2x4 rectangles at a 1/3 of the cost.) Safe for any horse? Absolutely. I. Love. It.

I WISH I had the funds to do my whole property. Unfortunately that's not in the plans. But all the paddocks/small areas are no-climb, while the big pastures are electric.

galloping-gourmet
Aug. 19, 2011, 07:34 PM
Do you run an electric wire along the top to keep them from leaning over it?

GoForAGallop
Aug. 19, 2011, 09:45 PM
Do you run an electric wire along the top to keep them from leaning over it?

Mine is 5' tall and I have horses on the shorter side, so they don't really try to lean on it. I am planning a rope of electric around the top by winter, however, when they will try to nibble on the trees on the other side. Plus, I think it adds a nice "finish" to the fence, a firm visible line.

clanter
Aug. 19, 2011, 10:05 PM
I love my no-climb. Expensive? Heck yes. (Although less if you don't use the stuff specifically marketed for horses...I used fencing with the same 2x4 rectangles at a 1/3 of the cost.) Safe for any horse? Absolutely. I. Love. It.

I WISH I had the funds to do my whole property. Unfortunately that's not in the plans. But all the paddocks/small areas are no-climb, while the big pastures are electric.

if the mesh is wielded it will break apart under the pressure of a horse rubbing it butt against the fabric... longer lasting is the woven version

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OP... has rained in your area? if not run a ground tape next to the charged tap... around we have had so little rain electric fencing does not work because the lack of proper grounding through the earth

goodhors
Aug. 20, 2011, 01:09 PM
Best of all is having electric fencers that WORK ALL THE TIME.

New Zealand fence is DESIGNED to have a working fencer on it at all times, PREVENTING equines from getting close or even testing it to graze beside. If your horses got hurt, they are not respecting the electric charge. So if or when the fencer is not working correctly or in all parts of the wire, maybe was not installed well, horses can tell and get into the wire. Perhaps with age, the insulation is cracked or getting shorted out.

Our fence like that has 8 strands, with 4 hot ones, top, middle and bottom. Both a very VISIBLE fence and it BITES them when touched. Horses LEAVE IT ALONE because I keep the ENTIRE fence weed and grass free, so the electric is HOT along the whole length in all 4 wires. I have had this fence for years, love it and would buy it again if I needed more fence put in.

Management tip is to not crowd the space fenced in. This gives each horse plenty of room in their "group" to escape another and not run into fence. I don't put more than 4 in a group for each enclosed (fairly good sized) barnyard paddock that then opens to field, so they can move freely and stay clear of the fence. A bully would have less companions or be kept alone so they could not corner anyone by the fence. Lots of circulation room while waiting to come inside! I don't want lower status horse getting into the wire or trying to jump out, while frantically trying to escape the bully.

We don't use solar fencers, too many cloudy days here. They can be unreliable even with battery back-up. May not even have enough power for that heavy wire to bite the animals! New Zealand fences take Low-Impedence fencers that pack a good jolt for long distances with those thicker wires.

Get your fence testers out, start at the fence charger and see what juice you have in the wires, where it drops. Then you can fix the problem, shouldn't have any more horse injuries. Mine respect that hot fence, so they stay FAR away from it to prevent being injured. If you get your fence working correctly, that could save you needing to invest in new fences to keep horses uninjured. They will stay BACK from a good hot fence.

Fences NEED attention to keep them working well. Includes trimming and keeping the fencer working to all areas, so YOU or your hired help must do that work.

Even with woven or welded fence wire, you want HOT electric to keep horses from rubbing on it or leaning over to pull it down, pawing at it. If your electric is not hot, you will have damaged fences of any kind, and damaged horses that got into the wire. Even new woven won't take horse working on it for very long. Electric inside and over the top of woven will keep your EXPENSIVE fence investment looking good for a long time.

LauraKY
Aug. 20, 2011, 01:19 PM
We have board perimeter fence and are working on electric tape interior fence...just finished the back property line and the front of another pasture. Eventually, I plan to put Ramm fence type (hot) in a replace the electric tape.

I won't use braid or wire...I've seen too many devastating injuries. Why tempt fate?

CFFarm
Aug. 20, 2011, 01:31 PM
I have no climb with a strand of electric on top. Love it for the simple reason, not only do horses stay in, critters stay out (haven't had anything climb it yet). We have had a drought until a couple of weeks ago and we had to pour water onto our solar charger ground rods to keep it going.

hosspuller
Aug. 20, 2011, 05:29 PM
I have the same results that Goodhors has. In 15 years, zero fence injuries. Only 3 wires, a hot fencer, constant work to keep the weeds off, large pastures and fence trained horses are the essential parts of our horse keeping. The horses know to stay away from the fence. Even when they do the galloping, thundering herd party, it's incredible watching them veer off the fence line at full steam. :eek: The very attractive split rail fence at the home site has been the weak link in our pastures. Even with a hot wire on top, the horses have pushed through it. The high tensile fence is horse proof so far.