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Meredith Clark
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:21 PM
I'm coming down from a x-country high right now because me and Juice had the BEST school at Fair Hill tonight. We did all the novice course (including the scary double bank, trakhner, and ditch combo) and we started schooling some of the more moderate training fences :D

Anywho..

I feel Soooo ready to move up to Novice excpet for my stadium. I can ride a double bank, a half coffin, a drop 3 strides to a ramp (all that I did tonight) but god love me I can't ride a two stride stadium line to save my life.

I get so tense in stadium and I just don't have the timing down yet. Also Juice has a great gallop out in x-country and just sort of gallops over the fences. In stadium our canter just isn't the same as it is on x-country.

I keep him at a private farm that I love but there's no ring or indoor and we currently have 2 jumps set up (one of the other girls brought them and their just spaced out in the field we ride in). My trainer has been trying to find places we can go but people in the area are hesitant to have "outsiders" school on their farm.

Is there anything I can do to improve my stadium jumping?

Big_Grey_hunter
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:29 PM
Do you have poles? You can set up a course of ground poles and the two jumps to help you figure out timing, turns, and the correct canter. It's not quite the same, but it does help you learn to balance on the tighter stadium turns and see your distances.

wsmoak
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:30 PM
First thing that comes to mind: Visualization. Seriously, it works. Your brain can't tell the difference between imagining it and actually doing it.

Watch videos of good jumping rounds, and then sit and visualize doing it yourself.

Obviously you need to find somewhere to practice for real, but this will help!

KateWooten
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:34 PM
Organise a truck and trailer for yourself. Haul yourself to lessons with other trainers.

What sort of a trainer has no access to an arena or jumps ?

Meredith Clark
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:38 PM
Organise a truck and trailer for yourself. Haul yourself to lessons with other trainers.

What sort of a trainer has no access to an arena or jumps ?

easy there...

I keep Juice at a racehorse lay-up farm. My trainer is a member of the racehorse industry who used to event. She's actually building an indoor (more so she can break baby racehorses but I can use it for whatever).

I ride with another trainer who has an indoor and jumps etc but I can afford to ride with her about once a month. It sucks!

I do have a truck and trailer, just don't know where to go!

Flying Ponies
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:51 PM
can you make a few jumps of your own? It is not too expensive if you keep it basic. You'll need a little bit of pressure -treated lumber, a circular saw and a drill.


Get 8' long, half-round landscaping ties to use as rails - from Home Depot for 2- 4$ each.

Get a 4"x4"x8' square post, cut in half will give you one set of 4 foot standards, (usually 8-10$)

For the base of the standards, get two 1"x6"x8' plank (around 6$ each) , cut into 2 foot sections and screw to the base of the standard.

Cost is about 25-30 $ for 1 jump with a couple of rails. Obviously you can paint and decorate as needed :) Flowers from the dollar store are a great addition.

Good Luck.

Duckz
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:54 PM
Go to hunter/jumper schooling shows! It sounds like the height isn't the issue, so do a bunch of rounds at a low height to get a better feel for jumping in the ring.

bwills2
Aug. 9, 2011, 10:59 PM
Try heading out to a jumper show, maybe a 2'3 or 2'6 division. I have the same problem with my older horse. Except he jumps fine at home and at lessons, but despises stadium at events, just wants to go x country. Last year I took him to a jumper show, did 2 classes at 2'6 and 2 classes at 2'9. First round was horrible, each round improved. It helped seeing those same lines 4 classes in a row!
Vince Dugan has some jumper shows, he's across from New Bolton Center.
Of course, all the other exercises mentioned are important to do, but getting out there and repeating in a show environment was a huge help for me and at an unrated show, not much more $ than a lesson.
Good luck! Good job doing the novice cross country at Fair Hill!!!! I hope to do it someday!!! Perpetual beg novice for me!

seeuatx
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:03 PM
Second Duckz idea.

I used to board at a more western oriented barn. The only "jumps" we had involved 2 pairs of real standards my dad built, and a bunch of lawn care timber rounds from lowes set on buckets. It didn't make much for real schooling, so I did all my course work at PC mounted meetings, and podunk local H/J shows.

Highflyer
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:19 PM
There's a jumper show at Fair Hill the last weekend in August--maybe go and do a 2'6 class and then a couple of 3' classes? Irish Tulip has jumper shows and I think they might allow schooling. Fox Crossing I know allows schooling. Hunter shows would be fine, too--most of them go up to 3'.

Although--I don't know how much your lessons cost, but I suspect that by the time you haul somewhere, and either pay for 2-3 classes or pay a ring fee and pay your barn manager/ trainer, you may well be looking at the cost of a regular lesson.

So it might be worth building jumps--my trainer doesn't have a ring, either, just a flat field with jumps, but it is amazing how she can predict what the courses at an event will be like and replicate them. It doesn't always stop me from riding like an idiot, but at least I can think back to my lesson and know what I'm doing wrong.

Fillabeana
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:43 PM
So, if locals are hesitant to have an 'outsider' school at their farm, is there any means of making yourself an 'insider'?
If there is a barn/trainer that you really seem to click with, ask if you can come set fences for lessons, or for the trainer to school a horse- you will get a non-riding 'lesson', and learn how and where and why the fences are set. That will go a long way toward improving your stadium, if you pay attention!

You may also be able to tack up, cool out/untack, muck out, clean tack, or otherwise make yourself an 'insider' somewhere. If you have some skills such as the ability to fix the wiring on a trailer, it may be easier yet. It should take a few weeks of earnest dependability, and possibly a paid lesson with a liability release signed, but if you consistently show up to help twice a week or some such, I'm sure the trainer/barn owner will at some point consider you 'cool to school'.

I also think having fewer jump schools will be good for your horse's future soundness.

If you make yourself something to set up a gymnastic line at home, you can do a lot with a little, and not too much jumping. I would also make one more schooling jump, and set up a gymnastic that has a two-stride line (maybe trot in, jump an x, canter stride to small vertical, two canter strides to another vertical or an oxer), so your horse takes it at an appropriate novice speed stadium canter rather than a x-c gallop.

Meredith Clark
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:54 PM
Fillabean-

I'm def. trying to get in with a few farms in the area! Foxcrossing lets us school in their indoor for a price which is great but that's taking a lesson + the price of an indoor. Ok every now and then.

I think I'm going to have to go on a scavenger hunt around the farm. My trainer used to be really into eventing, doing the Young Riders stuff and upper levels. I think you're right that if I even had one more jump I could make some good lines. Would it work if I found barrels or is that too x-county-ish?

Oh and I do have poles! I have PVC poles with wood poles inside of them

lstevenson
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:03 AM
Oh and I do have poles! I have PVC poles with wood poles inside of them



If you have poles but just need standards, you can always pick up some of those blue and white plastic barrels for free (I'm told that you can get those for free at any of the commercial car wash places).




http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com
Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Virtual-Eventing-Coach/121366797928434)

Big_Grey_hunter
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:09 AM
Hay bales work as standards too, if you can afford to sacrifice some.

besum1
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:11 AM
barrels are a good thing to have for stadium! We have a set of blue and black barrels in the jumping arena and then some white ones out in the field.

Even if you may or may not have barrels in a stadium course at a show it gives you a solid jump to practice with at home. If you have any sort of boxes that would be a good thing! Just make sure there are no sharp/metal edges :) Honestly I don't think it matters what you jump as long as it's safe and how you organize your "course" will be what helps out your stadium :)

I keep threatening to steal some orange road construction barrels b/c I'm trying to desensitize my horse to scary things but sadly most of the construction is gone and they didn't leave behind any barrels for me.... haha

reay6790
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:21 AM
do you have poles? set up a line of poles and practice doing the add and the normal strides. like if it is normally a 6, do a 7, do a 6, do an 8, gallop a 5, do a 7, do a 6. the more adjustable he gets the better. plus it will help you with your distances.

i'm a hunter by nature, so i've noticed how many eventers can't see a distance to save their lives...i would practice doing xrails with a groundline and counding 3,2,1 in front of it. you want a nice medium-short distance for a jumper round. you also want to be not as far behind the motion as xc.

if you have any more questions (i have tons of ideas) feel free to PM me :)

Meredith Clark
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:27 AM
do you have poles? set up a line of poles and practice doing the add and the normal strides. like if it is normally a 6, do a 7, do a 6, do an 8, gallop a 5, do a 7, do a 6. the more adjustable he gets the better. plus it will help you with your distances.

i'm a hunter by nature, so i've noticed how many eventers can't see a distance to save their lives...i would practice doing xrails with a groundline and counding 3,2,1 in front of it. you want a nice medium-short distance for a jumper round. you also want to be not as far behind the motion as xc.

if you have any more questions (i have tons of ideas) feel free to PM me :)

I think practicing seeing distances is really important and I don't think I'd ever win one of those classic hunter games where you see who can see the furthest distance.

However, I don't know what you mean by being "behind the motion" on x-country. Me and Juice are very insync x-country and I rarely get left behind on a jump.

Carol Ames
Aug. 10, 2011, 01:08 AM
They will probably have a ring set up for schooling; even with only cavaletti, they can be a great help.:yes:

Xctrygirl
Aug. 10, 2011, 09:45 AM
Hey Meredith...

There's a jumper show at Vince Dugans this Satruday. Tell me and I will shoot you an email of the prize list. Very affordable and close to you.

Also I know a BUNCH of farms by Elkton that you can go school in their rings.

But really get thee to a hunter or jumper schooling show and do 3-4 rounds per show.

And I also agree with the course of poles on the ground. Really helps. (I was doing it last night and cursing every 3rd round or so. LOL)

~Em

Jleegriffith
Aug. 10, 2011, 10:08 AM
I 2nd the plastic barrels, hay bales and anything you can find that is jumpable. How about black plastic pipe? Can you tell that I had some ghetto jump courses back in the day:lol: I would prop up pvc poles on the barrels or anything I could find.

FWIW- I love Janice Dugan and this she is the absolute best at helping with stadium issues. I highly recommend her and wish I lived closer. She doesn't focus much on flatwork but has a great eye for fixing rider/horse issues and giving you a ton of really awesome exercises to help horse/rider improve.

The prices are vey reasonable as well!

wizetta
Aug. 10, 2011, 10:31 AM
St. Augustine Pony Club is having a jumper show this Saturday too.

Does anyone have info on the jumper show at Fair Hill?

NMK
Aug. 10, 2011, 10:33 AM
What JLee said...in the winter I take few months and board/train at the local hunter barn. Would that be possible for you, even for just one month? All my horses spent time there as young event horses getting used to crowds, horses jumping next to them, etc. But the real benefit was jumping a few times a week under a watchful eye, so the colored poles just became part of the routine.

Nancy

Xctrygirl
Aug. 10, 2011, 10:40 AM
I have some of the flyers Wizetta.

Give me your email.

~Em

purplnurpl
Aug. 10, 2011, 10:58 AM
here is a long shot.

what if you ride SJ like you ride XC?

seriously. Novice XC is not ridden at that quick of a gallop.

SJ used to be my nemisis. I struggled for years with my little horse. (she was small, only 15.2h)
I took lessons 1-2 times a week.

Finally while I was with my most favorite coach at a clinic he told me to ride SJ like I ride XC.

This totally fixed my issue--probably because my horse was small and she needed to be ridden quite forward.

I would go out there, set myself in a light 1/2 seat and just point her in the correct direction and let her do the rest, rather than try to keep a nice slow step.

Jleegriffith
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:09 PM
Purp- that was the same with my conn/tb. He has a shorter step and making the lines required a forward ride. The key was to be forward but in balance so we spent a lot of time jumping bigger jumps in our lessons with lots of roll back and bending lines to get him rocking back and jumping off the hind end at a more forward pace. Learning to ride them in the correct balance is half the battle but hunter trainers are excellent at teaching you how to just leave them alone.

When I started my lessons with her she was sure he would never be much more than a 3ft horse as making the distance in the 3'6" was so difficult but as he became balanced we easily adjusted for the bigger heights. He became 100x more rideable.

Ha, now I am going to have to get myself up there for some lessons:D

Meredith Clark
Aug. 10, 2011, 12:13 PM
This totally fixed my issue--probably because my horse was small and she needed to be ridden quite forward.

.


Juice is pretty small to. He's very uphill but LAZY. He enjoys getting behind my leg and just sort of loping around. When we're out on x-country he's a totally different horse. Ears up, forward and totally game.

We did this set at Fair Hill yesterday, a coup to the double banks. I accidentally jumped the training coup and then he had the best gallop to the double bank. I would LOVE to have that sort of impulsion going into stadium. Not a true gallop but the forward feeling!

I wish I had known about the jumper shows this Sat!!!

purplnurpl
Aug. 10, 2011, 01:25 PM
Juice is pretty small to. He's very uphill but LAZY. He enjoys getting behind my leg and just sort of loping around. When we're out on x-country he's a totally different horse. Ears up, forward and totally game.

We did this set at Fair Hill yesterday, a coup to the double banks. I accidentally jumped the training coup and then he had the best gallop to the double bank. I would LOVE to have that sort of impulsion going into stadium. Not a true gallop but the forward feeling!

I wish I had known about the jumper shows this Sat!!!

maybe just try letting him open up a little bit more then...?
I tell you, it was night and day for me.

I went from having stops (especially in triple combos) and a fussy horse to winning meter jumper shows and getting ready for preliminary.

I always felt like I was flying around the course but the videos just showed her cantering around in the correct length of stride needed. lol. go figure.

Meredith Clark
Aug. 10, 2011, 01:30 PM
Hey Meredith...

There's a jumper show at Vince Dugans this Satruday. Tell me and I will shoot you an email of the prize list. Very affordable and close to you.

Also I know a BUNCH of farms by Elkton that you can go school in their rings.

But really get thee to a hunter or jumper schooling show and do 3-4 rounds per show.

And I also agree with the course of poles on the ground. Really helps. (I was doing it last night and cursing every 3rd round or so. LOL)

~Em

Emily,

Juice is actually in Oxford Pa, my other horses are here in Elkton and he might actually be joining them soon. At my place there still isn't a ring or anything so he's not really upgrading.

Where in Elkton are there places to school?

For those that recommended moving barns or taking him to a trainer for a month or so that's unfortunately not an option right now. Money is TIGHT and during my student teaching (from late Aug to November) my only income will be my part time job at the mall and my student loans. :no:

Meredith Clark
Aug. 10, 2011, 01:32 PM
I always felt like I was flying around the course but the videos just showed her cantering around in the correct length of stride needed. lol. go figure.

That is SO juice. I feel like i'm going SO fast when I ride him and but he's really not going fast at all :lol:

I'm really hoping all the hard work I've been putting into our dressage will help his stadium, I just don't really have a place to try it out.

Xctrygirl
Aug. 10, 2011, 01:37 PM
Emily,

Juice is actually in Oxford Pa, my other horses are here in Elkton and he might actually be joining them soon. At my place there still isn't a ring or anything so he's not really upgrading.

Where in Elkton are there places to school?

For those that recommended moving barns or taking him to a trainer for a month or so that's unfortunately not an option right now. Money is TIGHT and during my student teaching (from late Aug to November) my only income will be my part time job at the mall and my student loans. :no:

Ohhh even better.

I am a little stressed at work now but I'll send you a PM with more details of places near Oxford.

~Em

Meredith Clark
Aug. 10, 2011, 02:23 PM
Ohhh even better.

I am a little stressed at work now but I'll send you a PM with more details of places near Oxford.

~Em

Thanks Em.. hope work gets better for ya!

Give and Take
Aug. 10, 2011, 03:35 PM
the 'trick' in stadium is to maintain a consistent stride length.

if your horse is changing the length of his stride all the time, it's practically impossible for you to see a distance.

if you have poles, Linda Allen's 101 jumping exercises actually starts with many pole exercises, as does Jimmy Wofford's exercise booklet.

sounds like you need to find and keep that 12' stride within the smaller confines of stadium. developing these skills for staium will also help with xc as you move up.

good luck!

Fillabeana
Aug. 10, 2011, 04:01 PM
The hard work in dressage will help your jumping...if you use it to put your horse exactly on the line you want, to bend his body the direction you want, to have the rhythm nice...but if you micromanage things, he will understandably not go too well. I second the 'leave them alone' a la hunters, but in a nice, forward, rhythmic way.

If you want lessons for free, go set fences for a great teacher/trainer. Then go home with two or three gymnastic exercises per week that you can set up with 'ghetto' resources. I'd bet anything a good trainer whom you set fences for, would happily give you gymnastic exercises specific to your own horse. Then, when you CAN go to the schooling jumper shows, you'll blow 'em all away.

The last horse I turned from backyard, barely broke to blue-ribbon, recognized event winner, I did with these resources: not-really (short) regulation dressage size arena with decent footing, four jump standards, maybe six or eight poles, grassy fields, irrigation ponds, endless trails (with downed timber, hills, natural banks/ditches, irrigation ditches), and a truck and trailer to haul the horse somewhere to do a course. I never did go do a lesson, but I did school a 'real' stadium course twice, and go to one hunter schooling show. This was 20+ years ago, nowadays there are better trainers close by, but if you are safe cross country, you can do it. What I really remember is using my meager 'gymnastic' resources so that I would jump four or five times a week, but just over the 'new' gymnastic question, two or three times through.

But, of course, these free lessons are not as much fun as paying someone to watch YOU jump! And setting fences for you...although if you WORK for it, you'll get a ton out of it. Don't let not having the money to pay for 'real' lessons get in the way of you learning from a really good trainer that is in your area. Eventers are FAMOUS for a do-it-yourself reliance on themselves. Where there's a will, there's a way.

Xctrygirl
Aug. 10, 2011, 04:21 PM
Thanks Em.. hope work gets better for ya!

Complete IT switchover. No emails, blackberries, or server.

(Insert crazy bitch laugh here)

It's gonna be a rough couple days!!

~Emily

PS: I whole heartedly agree with watching tons of lessons of other peoples.

;)

Carol Ames
Aug. 11, 2011, 02:34 PM
set up a row of obstacles to jump, hay bales, wheelbarrows barrels, bicycles, even:eek:! Then, make a course out of them;) still in a line:o, i.e., no related distances:no:; just looping back half circling over the jumps:yes: until you've jumped them all! This is, I'm told a favorite of Katie, Ps' I agree most definitely with a jumper schooling show

GingerJumper
Aug. 11, 2011, 02:53 PM
Ride your SJ like your XC. At BN/N, you're not really going that fast on XC, so you could totally get that pace in an arena. Even though I did mostly jumpers with my Appy, I still kept that mentality of an "open" or a "full" stride, instead of a lazy little lope.

Definitely try some jumper schooling shows. Good luck :)

Carol Ames
Aug. 11, 2011, 02:56 PM
set up around the arena/ ring/ field poles on a 12' stride24 36 48, 60'; first trot around :yes:counting the number of strides between poles; then repeat doing the exact number of:yes: strides; next add one stride between each set of poles; count then, try counting the strides, out loud, or, in your head number of strides between poles, then go again doing the exact number;); next time, add one stride in each set; the counting will put you "in the zone:cool:" once you have learned the exercise at trot;try it in canter

JP60
Aug. 11, 2011, 03:12 PM
Get 8' long, half-round landscaping ties to use as rails - from Home Depot for 2- 4$ each.


If you can, check out full rounds at Tractor Supply, you may get more for less. You can also get the slightly smaller full rounds for even less. I use the smaller for ground poles.


Get a 4"x4"x8' square post, cut in half will give you one set of 4 foot standards, (usually 8-10$)


A less expensive material is 2x4x8. They cost < $3 and one makes good 4' standard. Cut in half and glue/nail together. While not as hefty as a full 4x4, for practice it is great. I built 9 sets and they work just as well for less cost.



For the base of the standards, get two 1"x6"x8' plank (around 6$ each) , cut into 2 foot sections and screw to the base of the standard.

Alternative....1x3x8 (<$2). cut into 2' sections (1 makes two bases). You do have to route out the center to flush the cross piece, but then just attach to standard using 2.5" wood screws (coated if possible).




Cost is about 25-30 $ for 1 jump with a couple of rails. Obviously you can paint and decorate as needed :) Flowers from the dollar store are a great addition.
Good Luck.


A simple flower box is using 1/2" plywood, 4X8 sheet. Cut out two sides, 8'x8". Cut 1 (2 optional) as 8'x6". Cut two sides as 8"x6". Nail the sides together and drill 12 to 14 holes in top 8'x6"). Paint as desired and drop flowers into holes. Does not weight much and if you use cheaper plywood ($15) you have a effective flower box. The flowers cost more then the box, it looks great under a vertical.

Going this route I built 9 sets for less then $100. The most expensive part was the jump cup. I got mine at horse.com for <$5 a set (metal). Now at home I have a nice small course that could be set up to 3'9" (I think big) but starts at 18". The biggest factor is not building them, but painting. If the farm likes the idea they may help on costs or building. What I love is that i can set up gymnastics, small tight courses, specific jump questions, play with ground pole exercises without going somewhere and have less control. It is worth the time and money to build if you can.



Flying Ponies ideas are good. I tried various methods till I found one that worked for me. At home, the jumps do not have to be as hefty as a school or show set. They just need to work. I second FP's comment, Good Luck!

deltawave
Aug. 11, 2011, 03:39 PM
Canter ALL THE TIME. Seriously. Think about how much trot we do in a typical "dressage" session. Mostly trotting. Canter work is like the redheaded stepchild, and yet it is the heart of lower level eventing!

Canter here, canter there, canter everywhere. Do an entire dressage test in canter. Lengthen, shorten, change direction, canter poles, canter hills, hack out at the canter. Canter 30 minutes a day until the canter is your "go to" gait. I'm exaggerating, but only a little. :)

And find some local H/J shows. :yes:

archieflies
Aug. 11, 2011, 04:12 PM
For those that recommended moving barns or taking him to a trainer for a month or so that's unfortunately not an option right now. Money is TIGHT and during my student teaching (from late Aug to November) my only income will be my part time job at the mall and my student loans. :no:


Having a few schooling jumps set up to work on gymnastics and lines will really help you to make the most of the few stadium lessons that you are able to take. You won't have to spend the whole monthly lesson just working on perfecting that one line... you'll be able to get the distances down at home and do actual coursework at lessons. Schooling jumps can be super cheap. :)

Also, when you go school cross country places, do you use their arena and stadium jumps before/after schooling? Some of my pony's stadium break-throughs have been when we've gone straight into the arena and jumped a course right after schooling XC.