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View Full Version : Ice Boots brands? and strategies?



ctab
Aug. 5, 2011, 07:47 PM
So... my old guy strained a tendon. Happily no tears :) and just a tiny bit of arthritis showed up on ultra sound on one hock. Front ankles are clean! Yea!
ANYWAY.. vets orders are 30 days tack/hand walk and ice the tendon (RF). She also mentioned poultice.
So I have a friend who has ice boots that use packs. She is loaning them to me. However they are an older brand, about 6 years or so. I will see what they are tomorrow. Another couple of borders use Ice Horse brand boots. One comes to ride her horse and then ices after her ride so the packs are still very cold when being used. Another, like me, is there most of the day and by the time she gets to use them they are not so cold, even when kept in a mini fridge's freezer.

So I am just wondering what you all use and the best methods, brands etc. Can I ice more than once? I was thinking going early and doing 20 minutes before work and then again several hours later and doing another 20.

Should I leave the poultice on overnight on a daily basis? Or for a few hours?
Thanks!!!

wishnwell
Aug. 5, 2011, 09:15 PM
I found our ice pad at Wal-Mart. It actually can be used for heat too. It has velcro straps to secure around the leg. I'm not sure exactly where you need it, but I'm assuming a leg.
Hope this link works for you
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Smart-Temp-Therapy-Combo-Pack/14234706

deltawave
Aug. 5, 2011, 09:58 PM
A knee tub full of ice and water is hands down the most effective way to ice. You can get knee tubs anywhere that horse racing supplies are sold, about $50.

A very slick alternative, much less messy, is an ice pump system such as a DonJoy or Air Cast cryo system. They cost about $75-100 and are very nice for a horse that won't stand in ice tubs.

Poultice = waste of time.

GiantHim!
Aug. 6, 2011, 02:08 AM
So if you are to pick an attachment for icing the front leg with the air cast what would you choose?
The calf cryo cuff or the arm/wrist cuff? Also is it worth it to get the AutoChill system?
Is this a ghetto Game Ready?

TIA

Hilary
Aug. 6, 2011, 07:38 AM
The original ghetto ice boot (and I have to give Saskatoonian credit for this) is made as follows:

Put bell boot on horse upside down so it is cupping the fetlock. Fill with ice. Stick 5-10 of those popsicles that come in the plastic tube (Freeze pops/otter pops - they have a bunch of names and are really cheap) into the bellboot/ice so they stick up around the leg. Wrap with polo wrap to hold in place. THis will last about 20 minutes - the ideal time for icing. Stick popsicles back in the freezer and they will be solid again in a few hours, in time to ice again.

Make sure you either buy flavors no one is likely to eat or clearly identify them as "HORSE POPSICLES" so the rest of the family won't eat your ice boots - and then complain about having eaten something that touched the horse.

I'm sure fancy ice boots work really well, but this method does too for a lot less money.

I do think circulating ice/supercooled water is best, but not always an option.

Donkey
Aug. 6, 2011, 01:49 PM
Another ghetto option for horses that won't stand in a bucket,

Buy two bags of ice
Wet legs
Put shipping boots on and stuff each one with half bag of ice.
Wait 20 minutes before removing, ice is typically not melted so you can re-use it again

yellowbritches
Aug. 6, 2011, 02:24 PM
I agree with dw. The BEST way to ice is to soak in a big tub. I like the various contraptions, but, really, a tub is cheap and easy to use.

For the horse who WILL NOT stand in a tub (as we found out with our crazy NZ horse...they one time we attempted it, he was going to kill himself and take everyone around and the barn down when he went! We didn't attempt again) the Jack's ice boots are a good alternative. They don't get the feet (depending on the horse, that can be a good thing or a bad thing) but you can ice pretty much from the fetlock to the knee.

You need to use an ass load of ice for the tub and the boots (half a bag of ice in shipping boots? Yeah. That's not enough in my book). I think when I was icing a lot last year I was averaging about 10 lbs a leg, maybe even more. Not quite as much in the tub since you are using ice water.

Using things like Jack's and tubs is a pain for showing because you have to be able to transport the ice (or go places where they have ice available. Millbrook!). I usually took one big cooler JUST for ice for legs. But since this is for an injury, it is less of a concern. :yes:

I don't like the pads and other funny sort of ways of wrapping and getting cold on their legs as I don't find any of it cold ENOUGH. Even with the Jack's...I use so much ice so the boots are stuffed so as it melts, it doesn't move away from the leg. Ice and some way of containing the ice (tub, Jack's) is the best way to go in my book.

faybe
Aug. 6, 2011, 03:39 PM
Haha I LOVE the description of the popsicle method! I've always done the giant muck tub, filled knee high with about 3-4 bags of ice and cold water. I like that you can do both fronts with it (and if your horse is exceptionally generous, both hinds can go in one too :)), although I guess in your case that's not necessary. If I'm icing after I ride, I just run and buy the ice after I'm done so it doesn't melt, but I have the luxury of a convenient gas station, which you may or may not have.

atheventer85
Aug. 6, 2011, 05:18 PM
I have 2 pairs of the yellow Jack's boots. They are perfect. We have closed off the valve, and fill them halfway with ice after the horse's legs are in them. They work great, and they're hard for the horses to step out of.

retreadeventer
Aug. 6, 2011, 05:49 PM
The original ghetto ice boot (and I have to give Saskatoonian credit for this) is made as follows:

Put bell boot on horse upside down so it is cupping the fetlock. Fill with ice. Stick 5-10 of those popsicles that come in the plastic tube (Freeze pops/otter pops - they have a bunch of names and are really cheap) into the bellboot/ice so they stick up around the leg. Wrap with polo wrap to hold in place. THis will last about 20 minutes - the ideal time for icing. Stick popsicles back in the freezer and they will be solid again in a few hours, in time to ice again.

Make sure you either buy flavors no one is likely to eat or clearly identify them as "HORSE POPSICLES" so the rest of the family won't eat your ice boots - and then complain about having eaten something that touched the horse.

I'm sure fancy ice boots work really well, but this method does too for a lot less money.

I do think circulating ice/supercooled water is best, but not always an option.

FREAKIN' AWESOME. Why I LOFF this place!!!! :)))))

ctab
Aug. 6, 2011, 06:15 PM
Thanks alll...

The boots I got from my friend are basically the ice pads with small squares that go inside a sleeve of the boots, like Ice Horse brands only these go much higher and lower. I'll give it a go with them for a couple of days and see how long they stay cold.

What is the best amount of time to ice? 20 min, 1/2 hour/ 45 min?

The nice thing about the boots is that I can put them on in the stall and leave him eating while I do other stuff.

Love the Popsicle idea!!

Xanthoria
Aug. 6, 2011, 09:12 PM
Ghetto but better: travel boots with picnic Ice Mats (http://www.amazon.com/Icy-Cools-Reusable-Ice-Mats/dp/B0002KQL2O/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1312679425&sr=1-2) underneath. Wraps around the leg, stays cold longer, doesn't get everything soggy and wet, and easier to apply than bags of ice, frozen peas or popsicles.

I do this after competitions or jump schools and they go one/off in seconds.

NSRider
Aug. 6, 2011, 10:15 PM
I wouldn't want to leave the ice on for longer than 20 minutes, 30 minutes would be stretching it and possibly cause some more issues. If you're looking to ice more than once a day, ice for 20 minutes, off for an hour, then ice again for 20 minutes. Don't want to over do it!

P.S. LOVE the horse popsicle wrap idea, fantastic!!

faybe
Aug. 6, 2011, 10:54 PM
OP, if you want to ice for more than 20 minutes, break it up- 20 minutes in, 20 out, then 20 in again. I wouldn't go longer than 20 minutes in one stretch.

Hilary
Aug. 7, 2011, 08:05 AM
Yes, 20 minutes at a time is the limit - too much cold can do damage to the skin and outer tissues.

But you can ice 3 or 4 times a day for 20 minutes each.

Ask your vet for the frequency and what to do in between (wrapping, dmso etc).

CookiePony
Aug. 7, 2011, 09:20 AM
How about icing hocks? Do people use the Jack's ice boots for that? A specially designed hock ice boot? A cheap neoprene hock boot with an ice mat underneath?

FoxChaser
Aug. 7, 2011, 09:37 PM
Yes, please do tell! My guy is still a bit puffy in the hock after rolling under the fence. Ice would be nice!

HappyRiding
Aug. 7, 2011, 11:07 PM
I have some 9 pocket ice boots that reach all the way up to my horse's hocks that I use, but ice horse has a back leg specific ice boot and one for just hocks like this->http://www.bigdweb.com/ICE-BOOT-HOCK/productinfo/8983/ I bet you good also get some frozen ice packs and wrap but I've never had to.

Not to hijack but has anyone ever heard of a bubble knee tub?-(http://www.bigdweb.com/BUBBLE-TUB-KNEE/productinfo/7986/) Looks pricey but looks effective. Does it do the same thing as the whirl boots?

yventer
Aug. 7, 2011, 11:21 PM
I'm a big fan of Pro-Kold ice boots, which use frozen inserts. I usually just freeze the whole boot+inserts, but inserts can certainly be frozen separately if freezer space is limited, and then put into the boot. I've been using them on my horses since 2001, and love them. They stay very cold a long time, and if you travel with them, putting them in a cooler with ice will keep them frozen for at least 1-2 days.

I agree that *nothing* beats standing the horse in a tub of water+ice. But that's not always practical, and it *is* possible to over-cool using that method. It's not possible to over-cool with the Pro-Kold boots.

Another thing I like about the Pro-Kold boots is that I can take them with me for an XC or jump school, put them on afterwards, put the shipping boots on over them, and by the time I've hauled the horse home, they've already had their icing treatment. The ease of use makes it much more likely I'll use them!

Any questions about these boots, please feel free to contact me by Private message or directly at redmoonfarm @ msn. com (remove spaces).