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FairWeather
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:19 PM
I'd like to build a sliding door about 12x12 for my shed. Is it easy to do myself (with help)?
Are there plans online anywhere? It seems fairly easy, but I'm wondering if it's a bit more than meets the eye :)

wsmoak
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:24 PM
I think building the door itself will not be so hard... finding the right hardware and mounting it correctly, then getting the door installed will be the challenge!

I need to build a sliding stall door and window too, so I'll be watching this thread in the hopes of some expert advice. :)

Alagirl
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:30 PM
sliding door hardware should be easy to find. I have seen it in a store near by.

It was one of the following three:
Lowe's
Home Depot
Tractor Supply....

If you have the tools building the door will be easy. You will likely need a frontloader to hang it on the track though.

Also...it's straight up construction, a local carpentry place should be able to put them together for you in no time flat. I'd consider that option (but mostly for large projects.)

HPFarmette
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:35 PM
Tractor supply has the hardware you need. I love that store, very polite and helpful in my area.

With a project like this, I usually "copycat"...go see one in a barn that you like.

WildBlue
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:31 PM
My dad's a contractor specializing in barns, and I helped him make the doors for my barn.

It seems like the critical point is attention to detail. Specifically once you have the frame laid down and are starting to attach the cross pieces, make sure it is absolutely square (diagaonal corner to corner measurements are exactly the same) and stays square. Also, when hanging the track, it needs to be level. Ditto rollers relative to the door panel.

You might want to talk to someone knowledgeable. I don't recall the details, but he was very insistant that all track-and-roller hardware is not the same and some styles are much less durable and user-friendly than others.

If you do everything right, two people ought to be able to mount it. Have the track installed (one end open) and door built flat on the ground with roller hardware attached. Then just stand the door up, slide it onto the track, and pin the end to keep the door from coming back off.

Bluey
Aug. 3, 2011, 02:01 PM
We still celebrate the day we replaced the big barn sliding doors with overhead ones.

The size you mention, 12'x12', is a very large door and if wood, very heavy.
Be sure you are framed to hold up that much weight.
Did you think to make that two 6' doors?

In our very windy spot, sliding doors don't last long and they are hard to repair and hang up again when a good wind blows them off.
We ended enclosing the West end of barns, when we could not keep those doors there.

Those overhead doors are absolutely wonderful, worth every penny.
Ours are manual, with a chain pull and one is 19' wide by 14' tall, used to have two big sliding doors in that opening that my back would cringe every time I tried to push one open and was impossible when frozen in the winters.
Those two doors made great wind breaks for the cattle pens, much better than the xyz* doors they were for the 40+ years before that.
Guess what, we even have reopened the West ends on barns and have overhead doors in them.:winkgrin:

Alagirl
Aug. 3, 2011, 04:55 PM
We still celebrate the day we replaced the big barn sliding doors with overhead ones.

The size you mention, 12'x12', is a very large door and if wood, very heavy.
Be sure you are framed to hold up that much weight.
Did you think to make that two 6' doors?

In our very windy spot, sliding doors don't last long and they are hard to repair and hang up again when a good wind blows them off.
We ended enclosing the West end of barns, when we could not keep those doors there.

Those overhead doors are absolutely wonderful, worth every penny.
Ours are manual, with a chain pull and one is 19' wide by 14' tall, used to have two big sliding doors in that opening that my back would cringe every time I tried to push one open and was impossible when frozen in the winters.
Those two doors made great wind breaks for the cattle pens, much better than the xyz* doors they were for the 40+ years before that.
Guess what, we even have reopened the West ends on barns and have overhead doors in them.:winkgrin:

Like a big garage door?

(I keep forgetting that they make them for barn applications...)

Bluey
Aug. 3, 2011, 07:42 PM
Like a big garage door?

(I keep forgetting that they make them for barn applications...)


Yes, we got the plain ones, but they make overhead doors with the same color and finishes as wood ones, you can't tell they are not regular old type barn doors from far away.

I would be sure to add windows, even small ones, to any door, especially large ones, so they brighten the interior.:)

Alagirl
Aug. 3, 2011, 09:07 PM
Yes, we got the plain ones, but they make overhead doors with the same color and finishes as wood ones, you can't tell they are not regular old type barn doors from far away.

I would be sure to add windows, even small ones, to any door, especially large ones, so they brighten the interior.:)


I was JUST about to add: 'get windows'

saves a lot on the electric bill! (I can't stand dark spaces....)

Foggy Clouds
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:59 PM
My BIL mounts the hardware on the barn then after mounting the rollers on the top horizontal piece of the barn door, hangs that piece on the barn hardware then builds the door. I suppose you could build the door frame on the ground, mount it, and then fill it in with wood or tin after you have the frame up so that you are not trying to lift so much weight.

WildBlue
Aug. 4, 2011, 07:46 AM
In our very windy spot, sliding doors don't last long and they are hard to repair and hang up again when a good wind blows them off.


Just curious--could you describe? You don't use turnbuckles to keep the door from flapping in the wind? Or pin the end of the track to keep the door from coming back down? I'm trying to visualize how this happens.

Rabtfarm
Aug. 5, 2011, 07:44 AM
Dear Fairweather,

I have built and replaced 8 barn doors here, with new track hardware, plus four stall doors and track. Wild Blue" father is correct about the details!

Door track hardware appears the same, but there are model differences. I like to use the hanging rod style..easier to install and adjust than the exterior hanging bracket version. The model I am referring to has a long slightly offset 1/2" threaded rod that goes vertically down thru the 2x6 perimeter rail at the top. Hangs on the same double roller as the bracket mount.
Spend some time planning ahead, install the track and mini shed roof over the exterior track, build the door(s) to cover sides, etc. Consider door thickness in your design and where the track center and door will hang relative to the door opening, trim etc. You want the inside of the door about 1/4" from the outside edge of the exterior trim. Make sure you have all the hardware and materials before buildling the door, triple check your height and width measurements. Look for 1/2"- 3/4" clearance above floor under door; these barns move around alot. I built some of mine too tight and I get door bindage every winter when the ground freezes.
When building the door(s), make sure your wood sheathing has dried and shrunk before building. I use exterior wood glue and ss wood screws to attach the sheathing to the frame of the doors. Make sure you have full and level/flat support under the door when building or the door will be built warped.
I installed rollers on the ground for some doors, stop blocks at the stop ends of others for keeping them from flapping in the wind. You can also add a flat 1x4 vertical pine center astragel for keeping the wind minimized on double doors.

FairWeather
Aug. 5, 2011, 07:46 AM
My BIL mounts the hardware on the barn then after mounting the rollers on the top horizontal piece of the barn door, hangs that piece on the barn hardware then builds the door. I suppose you could build the door frame on the ground, mount it, and then fill it in with wood or tin after you have the frame up so that you are not trying to lift so much weight.

that's what I was thinking :)

I can't do overhead door based on the construction of the shed, and I'd like the door to be on an extra long track so it can sheild different areas at different times, if that makes sense?

Bluey
Aug. 5, 2011, 08:42 AM
Just curious--could you describe? You don't use turnbuckles to keep the door from flapping in the wind? Or pin the end of the track to keep the door from coming back down? I'm trying to visualize how this happens.

We had the strongest hardware they made, the doors were secured, they were closed when very windy and tied together and our very strong winds would eventually blow the West doors off.
We hung the doors as low as possible that they would still slide, so the bottom upside down V piece they slided on helped keep them in place.
We had to replace the top runners a time or two.
After a few times, we just closed the West end of the barns.
Now, we had some smaller sliding doors or those where the worst wind didn't hit them directly that were fine, other than, as all large sliding doors, you have to push hard to get them to slide.

Now, we have two overhead West doors that don't have any problem at all, maybe because they are inside the frame, not on the outside, as hanging doors were?

I understand there are places you don't have the height to have overhead doors, or if you want to use them as a sliding wall, of course an overhead door, being fixed, won't work for that.
That was just a suggestion.

Then, you also may not have our winds to contend with, so any door is safe.:)

FairWeather
Aug. 5, 2011, 11:00 AM
Rabt and others, thanks so much for the feedback!

clanter
Aug. 5, 2011, 03:44 PM
here is link Richards-Wilcox hardware... they have been making industrial grade door hardware for about one hundred and thirty years. They have several versions that can handle the wind loads Bluey is talking about. Also they have trolley/truck assemblies to handle door panel to 10,000 pounds.

My company has used their products over the last four decades on many federal installations and zoos

The RW hardware is a one time purchase with a life expectancy of 100 years plus

note this a 3.17 MB file:
http://www.rwhardware.com/HardwareCatalog.pdf


Another option would be a rolling steel door that is wind rated. The manufacturers obtain wind rating on these types of door by adding wind lock clips in the door guide that secures the door in the guide as the wind pressure increases. The rolling steel door is an induistrial door (translate: expensive but long lasting) that is made up small slates that inter connect and can be between 24ga and 16 ga (these are some times referred to as barrel doors as they look like window shades--- the light weight more moderately priced versions (much cheaper) are call sheet doors which are a corrugated sheet of metal usually 28ga to 24 ga)...these to can have wind locks.

The sectional overhead door that look like barn doors are referred to as Carriage House Doors. These can be either real wood or steel panels textured to appear to be wood, some of the metal versions are even stainable.

The sectional overhead door that look like barn doors are referred to as Carrage House Doors. These can be either real wood or steel panels texitured to appear to be wood, some of the metal verisons are even stainable. These are not cheap doors.