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rizzodm
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:39 AM
How do you slow your posting? On the rise or on the sit down? I find it easier to pause on the rise but just read that I should be pausing on the sit down. I tried this today and found it difficult.
So what do the rest of you do?

alterhorse
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:25 AM
How do you slow your posting? On the rise or on the sit down? I find it easier to pause on the rise but just read that I should be pausing on the sit down. I tried this today and found it difficult.
So what do the rest of you do?

I had some issues with certain horses getting quick at the trot, and my trainer told me to sit and let my pelvis tip forwards (sit and let the top of the pelvis rock forwards slightly while the seat bones stay stationary on saddle).

It was amazing how the horse responded instantly for me when I did that.

When I have the pace I want, I also learned to post really tall (and balanced), keep my knee loose on the saddle, and to think about letting my knee drop straight down when I rise out of the tack.

My trainer said to think about letting the horses shoulders be free to move without any restriction from my knees. This Idea helped me a lot too.

netg
Aug. 3, 2011, 02:19 AM
I don't change the speed of my post rising or sitting... it's the entire cycle.

I do it by tightening my core but staying unclenched in my legs, butt, etc. A recent blog I read (I think referring to a Mary Wanless clinic, though I'm not positive) described the feeling as sucking on your tongue - like you're holding a lozenge to the roof of your mouth and sucking on it. This automatically makes your core tighten without stiffening anything. That's the feeling I recreate while posting which slows my rhythm and gets my horse to slow his trot to match.

carolprudm
Aug. 3, 2011, 09:42 AM
I had an absolutely horrific time at a clinic on this issue to the point where the clinician told me to go home and figure it out on my own (so I spent all this time and money for?????)
So I came up with, maintain tone in my body but not tension and slow the rise by engaging my hip flexors. I keep my back and seat soft and spongy, IOW land softly and resist the rise.

The wrong thing for me was to max out the engagement in my seat and back and try to force my seat down onto her back.

Think of a ball. If it is full to bursting with air it is hard and bounces very well especially if you throw it down to the floor as hard as you can. My previous mare found it very easy to bounce me off her back like a super ball and I can't say I blame her. But if the ball is softer and you just let it fall it won't bounce nearly as well.

easyrider
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:16 AM
Both. The entire movement is in "slow motion."

AllWeatherGal
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:29 AM
Ground pole exercises have helped me understand cycle without having to try quite so hard. Have at least 4 poles and change the spacing, the horse will (we hope) try to adjust him/herself and you will feel the corresponding change.

Then take the memory of that feeling and replicate without the poles.

I also remember being told to stay in the air a little longer, but all that did was mess up the rhythm for me *and* poor horse.

carolprudm
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:36 AM
I also remember being told to stay in the air a little longer, but all that did was mess up the rhythm for me *and* poor horse.
LOL, that was probably not nearly as bad as me trying to velcro my butt onto the saddle.

If I can just jam my butt down a little harder......

merrygoround
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:40 AM
Some good thoughts here.

Another approach is to think of making your shoulders go slower, by keeping them up and back. This is especially useful in the stretchy trot, when you want the horse forward, and energetic, but not quick.

Velvet
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:07 PM
I think most people remember when they first started to learn the post and were often left behind. It's similar. Just allow yourself to soften and feel slightly behind the horse's tempo. It really is as simple as that.

TickleFight
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:10 PM
Learn to sit the trot.

alterhorse
Aug. 3, 2011, 03:39 PM
I think most people remember when they first started to learn the post and were often left behind. It's similar. Just allow yourself to soften and feel slightly behind the horse's tempo. It really is as simple as that.

It is simple, but for some, reaching the stage of being able to feel that connection between their center and the horses tempo can be a challenge.

Before I had my first glimpse of that connected feeling, I sometimes struggled with horses that were very forward, and sensitive to my balance, as they would get very quick at times, and despite my best efforts to "slow my body", nothing seemed to work, and it was very frustrating.

Fortunately I found a trainer who was gifted in the understanding of biomechanics, and by offering suggestions for subtile adjustments to my movements, I hit that connection one day, and finally had an "ah ha" moment.

Once someone "feels" that connected feeling, then they have a reference point to explore upon, and expand upon. But for some, it's really hard to just accidentally stumble into that synergetic way of moving with the horse.

rizzodm
Aug. 4, 2011, 10:45 AM
I don't change the speed of my post rising or sitting... it's the entire cycle.

I do it by tightening my core but staying unclenched in my legs, butt, etc. A recent blog I read (I think referring to a Mary Wanless clinic, though I'm not positive) described the feeling as sucking on your tongue - like you're holding a lozenge to the roof of your mouth and sucking on it. This automatically makes your core tighten without stiffening anything. That's the feeling I recreate while posting which slows my rhythm and gets my horse to slow his trot to match.

I tried this last night and what do you know it worked!

Thanks:D

netg
Aug. 4, 2011, 12:46 PM
I tried this last night and what do you know it worked!

Thanks:D

That's great!

I don't remember which blog it was I read that on, or if the writer is a poster on the board. If so, I hope she takes credit for the wisdom she shared from the clinic! I have been using it on my 60-something mom who has no interest in "tighten your core muscles" but loves the automatic reaction from her horse if she thinks of sucking on a lozenge.

rainechyldes
Aug. 4, 2011, 03:16 PM
Sounds really dumb but I ...sing.
Yep.

Yankee doodle in fact.

Slower I sing, the slower I post. - works everytime - course people in the ring think you are a bit odd . but eh.

netg
Aug. 4, 2011, 04:20 PM
Sounds really dumb but I ...sing.
Yep.

Yankee doodle in fact.

Slower I sing, the slower I post. - works everytime - course people in the ring think you are a bit odd . but eh.

When my horse is being a freak I refer to him as a fire-breathing dragon. And therefore, naturally, I sing Puff the Magic Dragon. It helps.

2tempe
Aug. 4, 2011, 05:58 PM
All I can say is that if ANYONE had told me at the beginning how many body parts (mine and horse) I would have to worry about in dressage, I never would have taken my first lesson. Ignorance was certainly bliss for a while...

And interestingly the more I do this, the more ah ha moments occur; took quite a while until I could sort out what I'm feeling and doing - or not doing.

BUT I've never had a horse that I had to slow the trot. If I did that on current mare, she would stop and take a nap!

merrygoround
Aug. 7, 2011, 07:08 PM
"BUT I've never had a horse that I had to slow the trot. If I did that on current mare, she would stop and take a nap!"--2tempe

C'monna my house, we'll fix that.:lol: :lol: :lol:

Ridinwyoming
Aug. 8, 2011, 04:28 PM
What works for me is to count in my head - one, two, one, two at the pace I want to go. As I count slower my mare slows down.