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View Full Version : What areas are in need of a talented young horse trainer?



AlterrainTrainer
Aug. 1, 2011, 06:52 PM
If one was looking to move elsewhere in the country and looking to start a business training (mostly young horses, but also experience at FEI), what areas are really needing someone like this? Anyone know of any farms looking for a resident trainer?

SaddleUp158
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:30 AM
Oklahoma City could use more options. Not sure about actual barns looking for trainers, but we don't have many options when it comes to dressage.

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:39 AM
Pretty sure I saw an ad in this week's Chronicle for an Assistant Young Horse trainer at Rolling Stone Farm.

HFSH
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:43 AM
Wisconsin could use more options. Not sure the WI economy could support it tho. :no:

Megaladon
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:56 AM
I would love if my farm could support a young horse trainer!! We desperately need trainers with a dressage base. It is sooo limited here in Northwest PA. :no: If you moved here I would send you some business!!

This is what to expect in my area as far as weather goes. Spring--cold, muddy, brisk winds.
Summer--muggy, jungle like heat. Lush grass.
Fall--crisp mornings, warm afternoons, beautiful foilage.
Winter--freezing cold, snow and ice. Lake effect storms.

dghunter
Aug. 2, 2011, 03:44 PM
NW Ohio. Very limited options without driving for awhile. Not sure there would be enough interest though... I also noticed a lack of dressage trainers in Louisville when I was looking into moving there.

WBLover
Aug. 2, 2011, 03:57 PM
Cincinnati, OH definitely!! I couldn't find anyone who wanted to start my young horse unless I could guarantee they wouldn't be bucked off---seriously.

And you would probably get business from northern KY, Dayton, and eastern Indiana as well!

ise@ssl
Aug. 2, 2011, 05:03 PM
Just about everywhere. But I think you have to look at the areas that have big shows and large dressage farms. That will help you market the horses much easier and have access to more schooling shows to showcase the horses you train.

AlterrainTrainer
Aug. 2, 2011, 06:38 PM
We're actually looking at places near Cleveland, OH for those who have suggested OH.

dghunter
Aug. 2, 2011, 08:34 PM
AlterrainTrainer, please just move that a little west! I just moved from the Cleveland area where there were quite a few choices to out here where I have virtually no choice :no: Unfortunately, we also aren't very close to any rated/recognized shows. Most are at least an hour and a half, if not more.

Forte
Aug. 3, 2011, 11:16 AM
You know, this is a topic that is near and dear to my heart . . . We always hear about the lack of young horse trainers, but when I put my shingle out as a young horse trainer, I got very little interest. And that's with me having a good track record of bringing young horses from totally untouched in a field to winning at Equine Canada Gold rated shows. I found that in my area, breeders/owners were very used to sending their youngsters to "cowboy" trainers, and weren't really intersted in their horses having a correct start as a dressage horse. I think that part of the reason is that the cowboy trainers "break" the horses much faster, which means less training costs. However, from what I say, the horses that had 30 days at the cowboy were not what I consider "broke". Yes, you could ride them around with their heads straight in the air, with little or no understanding of leg aids, bending etc, but they didn't really have a solid foundation as a dressage horse. Horses that I "broke", took 3-4 months, but they lunged obediently in side reins, had topline development, stood obediently at the mounting block, went walk/trot/canter with a basic idea of bend and acceptance of the bit, hacked out, maybe trotted over a few poles. This is a longer, more expensive training road, but one that I think is more fruitful in the long run.

Heinz 57
Aug. 3, 2011, 11:45 AM
You know, this is a topic that is near and dear to my heart . . . We always hear about the lack of young horse trainers, but when I put my shingle out as a young horse trainer, I got very little interest.

I find this to be true as well. I have some good business, but haven't found the great need that is frequently discussed here on COTH. The folks that DO have babies either send them to the cheapest cowboy they can find, or shell out the big bucks for the BNT.

Isabeau Z Solace
Aug. 3, 2011, 12:31 PM
I find this to be true as well. I have some good business, but haven't found the great need that is frequently discussed here on COTH. The folks that DO have babies either send them to the cheapest cowboy they can find, or shell out the big bucks for the BNT.

Agree. The BNT often have eager European youngsters with seats of steel who are quite willing to put the first 10 rides- couple months on. Then the BNT gets one whenever they are comfortable the animal is safe.

Very often clients just want it done as fast as possible, 30 days is preferred. Then they bring the horse home and try to find someone willing to sit on it for $10/ride. And they do find those folks. Eagerness and good intentions go a long way toward making up for lack of actual mileage, knowledge, or skill. People young enough to still be on their parent's insurance are preferred....

Something I didn't understand when I was a 'do-eyed darling.' But now I get it.

Horses are just very expensive and breeders/owners want it done as cheaply as possible.

Heinz 57
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:39 PM
Then they bring the horse home and try to find someone willing to sit on it for $10/ride. And they do find those folks.


The bane of my existence is trying to explain to the uneducated owner WHY having the uninsured, practically free 16 year old that swears she can sit on anything and make it fart Grand Prix butterflies in less than 30 days is a bad idea.

CFFarm
Aug. 4, 2011, 11:19 AM
Pick where you want to live. If you build a better mousetrap they will find you. If not at least you're not stuck somewhere you'd rather not be.

meupatdoes
Aug. 4, 2011, 11:57 AM
The bane of my existence is trying to explain to the uneducated owner WHY having the uninsured, practically free 16 year old that swears she can sit on anything and make it fart Grand Prix butterflies in less than 30 days is a bad idea.

It is kind of amazing to me what kind of low-quality, total lack of results people will accept from a trainer. They want the "obvious" training ride. So the horse wrestles around in an approximation of training level pretty much forever.

So my experience is that you can build a better mousetrap and parade it around on display in the form of your own horses but the quiet ride that has no visible "training moments" but three weeks later the horse is unrecognizable is not dramatic enough for most people to pick up on.

red mares
Aug. 4, 2011, 02:47 PM
I have no knowledge of the OP's or other posters' abilities but, "talented young horse trainer" is used almost as often as a "stunning prospect with FEI potential."

Good luck with your endeavors.

dressurpferd01
Aug. 4, 2011, 06:30 PM
I have no knowledge of the OP's or other posters' abilities but, "talented young horse trainer" is used almost as often as a "stunning prospect with FEI potential."

Good luck with your endeavors.

Well bless your heart! You have no idea of my skills or accomplishments, not am I inclined to go into great detail here, hence my use of an alter.

dghunter
Aug. 4, 2011, 10:42 PM
Well bless your heart! You have no idea of my skills or accomplishments, not am I inclined to go into great detail here, hence my use of an alter.

This is an alter? Who is this really then? :lol:

Dogsandponies
Aug. 4, 2011, 11:06 PM
You should set up shop across the street from that Spirithorse/Dragonharte character. It's apparent that they are hurting for expertise in his area. :lol:

Isabeau Z Solace
Aug. 5, 2011, 04:50 PM
So my experience is that you can build a better mousetrap and parade it around on display in the form of your own horses but the quiet ride that has no visible "training moments" but three weeks later the horse is unrecognizable is not dramatic enough for most people to pick up on.

Agree. Too often clients want to "see something." Horse go faster, head go deeper, horse go dramatically more sideways, profuse amounts of sweat, horse's eyeballs popping out of it's head:no: If the horse is not pushed to the point of flying off it's feet or kicking out at the riders leg then clients often cannot see anything being done.

dressurpferd01
Aug. 5, 2011, 06:29 PM
This is an alter? Who is this really then? :lol:

:lol: LOL! That's what I get for posting when I'm exhausted from riding in 110* weather all day. Oops. I didn't really NEED an alter for this post, not really sure why I used one, but it seemed a good idea at the time.

Tegan301
Aug. 5, 2011, 06:59 PM
:lol: LOL! That's what I get for posting when I'm exhausted from riding in 110* weather all day. Oops. I didn't really NEED an alter for this post, not really sure why I used one, but it seemed a good idea at the time.

Alter-ego :lol: We get it! ;)

BTW, if you have not visited Forte's web site, it is beautiful and stupendous!!
www.saraalberni.com

dressurpferd01
Aug. 5, 2011, 07:21 PM
For those who question my ability. (http://i987.photobucket.com/albums/ae360/dressurpferd01/3yrold.jpg) That's a 3 yr old I started earlier in the year.

in_the_zone
Aug. 5, 2011, 08:34 PM
I'd love a gig like the one you describe as well. I have much the same experience. Freelancing is hard! :)

Edited to add: Rolling Stone Farm is looking for someone like you as an assistant type trainer. They are located in PA. Very professional bunch and one of the best breeders in the country.

Eggplant_Dressing
Aug. 5, 2011, 10:52 PM
Use your current reputation and contacts. If you want to move across country, just ask your mentors for barn and contact recommendations. You are better off going to a barn that does business with your mentor barn/trainer so you don't look like a young, carefree, and uncommitted drifter type trainer.

dghunter
Aug. 5, 2011, 10:55 PM
:lol: LOL! That's what I get for posting when I'm exhausted from riding in 110* weather all day. Oops. I didn't really NEED an alter for this post, not really sure why I used one, but it seemed a good idea at the time.

:lol: It's okay! And for what it's worth I never thought to question your abilities ;) Hope you have good luck in wherever you decide to go!

dressurpferd01
Aug. 5, 2011, 11:42 PM
Use your current reputation and contacts. If you want to move across country, just ask your mentors for barn and contact recommendations. You are better off going to a barn that does business with your mentor barn/trainer so you don't look like a young, carefree, and uncommitted drifter type trainer.

Luckily my wife has plenty of contacts in the area we're looking at. Do you show in TX?


:lol: It's okay! And for what it's worth I never thought to question your abilities ;) Hope you have good luck in wherever you decide to go!

Not a problem, as I said, not sure why I felt the need for an alter. Luckily it wasn't something that could severely bite me in the butt! :eek:

dghunter
Aug. 6, 2011, 10:43 PM
Not a problem, as I said, not sure why I felt the need for an alter. Luckily it wasn't something that could severely bite me in the butt! :eek:

That's the problems with alters sometimes! And a good rule of thumb for everyone to always be careful what you post on the internet. Some of the things people post... :eek::no:

dressurpferd01
Aug. 6, 2011, 10:58 PM
That's the problems with alters sometimes! And a good rule of thumb for everyone to always be careful what you post on the internet. Some of the things people post... :eek::no:

Oh yeah, trust me, that's a lesson that finally got drummed into my thick skull.

dghunter
Aug. 6, 2011, 11:40 PM
Oh yeah, trust me, that's a lesson that finally got drummed into my thick skull.

:lol::lol: Now if I could only teach my HS kids the same thing... Some of those lessons have to be learned the hard way unfortunately!

dressurpferd01
Aug. 6, 2011, 11:58 PM
Honestly, they're lessons that can ONLY be learned the hard way. Especially nowadays with the permanence of the internet. We have a whole generation that doesn't really understand that everything they put out there is there FOREVER.

FlashGordon
Aug. 7, 2011, 09:25 AM
Agree. Too often clients want to "see something." Horse go faster, head go deeper, horse go dramatically more sideways, profuse amounts of sweat, horse's eyeballs popping out of it's head:no: If the horse is not pushed to the point of flying off it's feet or kicking out at the riders leg then clients often cannot see anything being done.

Annnnnd that's the kind of training ride that scares me. At least around here, I feel like some trainers OFFER that as if to say "Look! I'm Training It!" Which freaks the crap out of me, and the horse too, and is a big reason I've been plugging away on my own for a long time.

I also don't really get the cowboy thing. Why send the horse to some backyard cowboy to get it going, when at the end of the day you really want it to do dressage or hunters. But again, at least in my area, there are ZERO options when it comes to getting a young horse started. Except the only "cowboy" in town, who hobbles them for a week at a time and never grains them.

Also why I'm contemplating starting mine myself, at least getting her going W/T and maybe canter, and then handing the reins to a competent professional to finish.

So yeah... OP.... if you want to start babies... come to WNY. :winkgrin:

MysticOakRanch
Aug. 7, 2011, 10:33 AM
I think a lot of owner/breeders in a lot of different areas are looking for a good rider to start their horses - but economic reality, if they have to send their youngster OUT for 90 days or more, they end up unable to recoup that cost. Here in CA, board alone runs $450 to $800/month, so if you add another $450 to $800/month for training, many buyers just aren't anxious to pay additional $3,500 for a green horse - 90 days doesn't create a Training Level horse. And if the breeder doesn't ride themselves, the horse continues in training and boarding.

So - if you are willing to travel to someone's farm for a reasonable price, take that cost of board out of the equation, the market for your services, alter or non-alter is probably going to be much better. Just a thought... Which means you have to fnd a place where there are a lot of farms in close proximity so you don't spend half your day driving.

We have a fabulous young horse trainer here who does three farms all on the same road (we are about 2 miles away from each other), so she basically spends 3 day/week on our road, doing somewhere around 10 horses. She spends 3 days a week in another location.

Her first few years, she didn't have much business - it does take a while to build up clientele - I saw her catch ride a young horse at an inspection when the trainer had a last minute confliict, and I tracked her down because she is a lovely rider! Now (a few years later), she has a waiting list, and is able to back down to just a couple of locations. But her first few years, she spent half her time on the road. Just saying - it takes a while to build up a clientele, and you have to make it affordable to the owners so they aren't tempted to go to a cowboy!

Also think about your fee structure - will you charge extra (or a comission) if you help sell young horses? What do you do for that extra charge - is it just riding the horse for prospective buyers, or will you actually handle marketing and advertising? What about videos, photos, etc - some owners will want to do that themselves, others will want help with the service.

You can almost pick your location, as long as their are horses bred there - it is really about marketing it in a realistic way, and pricing in a way that works for both you and the owners!

On the topic of cowboys, not all are created equal - there are a couple of guys up here who do a lot of sport horses, and they do a great job. Several of those horses have gone to FEI trainers after their first 60 or 90 days with the cowboys - and they understand weight and seat aids, are light and soft in the bridle, and are confident and forward. Just saying, don't lump all cowboys together, just as you wouldn't lump all "english" trainers together.












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Canterbury Court
Aug. 8, 2011, 04:37 PM
Sunny Central California! I'm interviewing for a full-time trainer right now. Feel free to contact me.

baylady7
Aug. 9, 2011, 01:18 PM
Unless you are independently wealthy, recommend you look where there is enough of an economic base to support your business. Unfortunately most of those locales already have a plethora of options.

Amado
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:27 PM
You should set up shop across the street from that Spirithorse/Dragonharte character. It's apparent that they are hurting for expertise in his area. :lol:

*snort, snort, snort*. :lol:

Lusoluv
Aug. 9, 2011, 11:36 PM
Anywhere in Iowa...esp. the Des Moines area!