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Rambler
Aug. 1, 2011, 12:33 PM
I bought a small 22 hp Kubota with loader that i use for dragging my arena, mowing, landscaping etc..and I plan to move snow with it this winter. I am really unhappy with how light and tippy it is. I picked up half a bucket load of sand with it yesterday and the back end lifted off the ground. It feels like it is going to tip on the slightest incline. I would like to load the tires. They are pretty small tires so I don't know if it will make much of a difference, but its worth a try. Is there a way to do this myself or does it need to be done at the dealer? What do I load them with? Someone told me you can use windsheild washer fluid.

mronthebit
Aug. 1, 2011, 02:32 PM
On a tractor that small I don't think the tires are big enough for it to make much difference. I have a little B7100 about that size that we use to cut the grass with so I am somewhat familiar with the size of the rear tires on your machine.

We usually load the rear tires on our large farm tractors to increase traction on wet, loose or slippery ground, not to improve stability.

If the tractor has a three point hitch, consider building a good sized box that mounts across it and filling the box with rocks.....I'm thinking two or three hundred pounds may be a good place to start to offset the front end loader.

MeghanDACVA
Aug. 1, 2011, 04:15 PM
You can have the tires fluid filled. Will help some.
You will prob need some sort of counter wt on the back. Might be tricky since counter wts are usually put on the front since implements attach to the back.

I would also check the specs on the tractor. You might be asking it to more than it is designed to do.

For future reference to anyone thinking of buying a tractor: always buy more tractor than you think you need. No one has ever complained about having too much horse power.

tangledweb
Aug. 1, 2011, 04:49 PM
For future reference to anyone thinking of buying a tractor: always buy more tractor than you think you need. No one has ever complained about having too much horse power.

True, but plenty of people complain about a tractor being too heavy, wide or tall.

The problem is that it is hard to get one machine that is really good at mowing a 10 acre field, maneuvering in the barn aisle and mowing the house lawn after rain.

It is not always a matter of going one size up in basically the same machine. There is a huge price difference between buying one compromise machine and buying a big tractor for the fields, a skidsteer for the barn and a zero turn for the lawn.

People are generally not idiots, they know that a compromise will not be as good at any task as a dedicated machine. Reality makes them settle for good enough.

MeghanDACVA
Aug. 1, 2011, 05:04 PM
True, but plenty of people complain about a tractor being too heavy, wide or tall.

The problem is that it is hard to get one machine that is really good at mowing a 10 acre field, maneuvering in the barn aisle and mowing the house lawn after rain.

It is not always a matter of going one size up in basically the same machine. There is a huge price difference between buying one compromise machine and buying a big tractor for the fields, a skidsteer for the barn and a zero turn for the lawn.

People are generally not idiots, they know that a compromise will not be as good at any task as a dedicated machine. Reality makes them settle for good enough.

Hopefully I am not being prickly but I never said, or meant to imply, that people are idiots.

I am no good at HP but we have a "small" tractor that we use for all of the above. We have 80 acres; 40 of which is in hay so that is another tractor(s) issue. But the smallest tractor we have does well in the barn--fits in the aisle nicely--, we have a finish mower to mow with, it can move 4x4 round bales, maneuver in the indoor arena to work it, etc. So I guess I don't understand the reasoning behind 3 pieces of equipment to do what we easily do with 1. We (ie DH) would love to have a skid steer but TBH he can't justify one since there isn't anything he can do with it that he can't do with even our small tractor.

And I will get the HP of the small one.

Rambler
Aug. 1, 2011, 05:39 PM
I really wanted at least a 30HP, but putting in a riding ring was the priority for this year. No sense having horses at home if you can't ride em. Maybe in a few years I can upgrade, but this one is going to have to do for now. I would say that it is basically too light to accomodate a loader. I don't think Kubota makes this particular model anymore (BX2200), maybe this is why. I will talk to my Kubota dealer about counter weights. Still wondering if I can do the tire loading myself? Thanks!

sketcher
Aug. 1, 2011, 09:21 PM
I have a similar tractor - I think it is 24 HP - little Kubota. I recently loaded the tires with beet juice and it makes a big difference. I couldn't move my manure before without taking my life in my hands and now it is much more stable. You can also add wheel weights instead or in addition to the liquid ballast.

MistyBlue
Aug. 1, 2011, 09:30 PM
I have a 23hp JD. I had the tires loaded (liquid, loaded halfway) and bought a weight box for the back. Nothing is worse than a tippy tractor. :no:

I also have a 33hp NH, no weight box and just air in the tires. Awesome tractor, but tippy as heck. I just did a "head stand" with it this past Friday, took 5 years off of my life let me tell you! :eek:

Load the tires, it helps a whole lot. Or get back tire weights, those you can easily do yourself.

But for lifting heavy weights with the front loader, a weight box or counter weights in back are the best way to counter the front weight.

Rambler
Aug. 2, 2011, 06:22 PM
Yikes Misty Blue, I hope you weren't hurt, a roll over is my worst fear. Thanks for the info everyone!