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EventingMEF
Jul. 29, 2011, 09:42 PM
Ok so the cross country course at my barn has gone neglected for a long time ever since it changed ownership. Now we are trying to fix it up again! Well today I was out there with my horse and realized that the blackberry situation was far worse then I imagined! Im talking seas of blackberries eight to ten feet high that span for several meters in every direction!

I know you're not supposed to cut the branches without cutting the roots, and horses get turned out in there every day, so harsh chemicals are out of the question...

Any suggestions??

suz
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:25 PM
sounds like a job for a few goats to me.

MeghanDACVA
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:27 PM
THere is a herbicide called Remedy. It is about the only that will get berries. If I remember right you apply it in the fall. It has been a while since I was doing battle with berries.
You apply to the berry patch so risk to horses is about zero.

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:28 PM
Good luck...I've had them lining my driveway. There's a grass strip near them and I was getting damned tired of getting hung up in those whenever I mowed. (I was mowing side-saddle for a while, LOL) Not to mention the birds eating them and then crapping purple all over my house and vehicles.

I just went with chaining them to the back of the tractor and yanking them out. Takes some time, not long to yank them out but a couple more seasons to catch all the bits that grow back from broken off root pieces. The big ones need a tractor, the smaller ones can be yanked out with a ride-on mower.

MunchkinsMom
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:46 PM
I had a bumper crop of raspberries growing on the fenceline when we bought our farm, I took the long handled brush clippers to them, it took some time, but by hacking them into little pieces, and cutting right down to the dirt, they didn't come back.

I occassionally see one trying to sprout, and I either hack it down or mow it down, they don't seem to survive regular mowing either.

Almost Heaven
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:11 PM
Just bush hog, if you can get to them. This year's first growth will be next year's berry bearing. So about 3 years of regular mowing will get rid of most of them.

catosis
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:34 PM
Send me to your farm. I shall eat the tasty buggers!

Zwarte
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:34 PM
Concur. Bush hogging is the answer.

Kestrel
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:56 PM
I would be happy to send you a Mountain Beaver. :lol: I don't know why, but they kill the blackberries around their burrows, which are fairly large and the entrances/exits are over about a 30'x30' area. Though once you have let it kill off your blackberries, you'll probably want to send it on to the next COTHer who wants to get rid of the vines, before your place looks like a minefield. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/pacificnw/2008706268_pacificpbeaver08.html

My blackberry removal method is to cut them to the ground, then when they sprout again, I use a claw tool to yank the roots out of the ground. Repeat, and in a couple years they're gone. While my husband occasionally practices White-Trash Landscaping (chaining up the Suburban to offending shrubs and trees), we haven't had to resort to that yet with the berries.

Good Luck!

Nes
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:59 PM
Goats.

Mine especially love strawberries unfortunately (not that we want them to eat our blackberries either!)

CatOnLap
Jul. 30, 2011, 02:10 AM
ahh the wonders of the himalyan blackberry, that nearly indestructible plant that will try and kill you when you go after its wonderful fruit.

We have tried the following methods:
1) hand clipping at ground level. Advantage: very green, good exercise
Disadvantage: needs to be done every 6 months, multiple bloody wounds, doesn't really eradicate them even after 15 years of doing it. Ask me how I know.

2) brush hogg: same results as hand removal, only less bloody.

3) Roundup or similar herbicide. Blackberries are genetically superior and laugh at puny human attempts to poison them, acquiring funny curled up leaves for a few weeks ( thereby temporarily fooling you into thinking you've won) and then regrowing with a vengeance, even more herbicide resistant, the next year.

4) Backhoe. Rip em up by the roots below ground level, burn the debris. The only reliable way we ever found to permanently remove them and well worth hiring an experienced operator for an afternoon or two to get rid of heavy infestation.

Tom King
Jul. 30, 2011, 08:44 AM
If you don't kill it with herbicides-Arsenal will kill it, but Remedy is supposed to be okay for grazing
http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDAS/dh_01b3/0901b803801b3c83.pdf?filepath=ca/pdfs/noreg/010-20897.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc

or get it dug up with heavy equipment with big teeth, it will continue to sprout forever.

coloredcowhorse
Jul. 30, 2011, 10:02 AM
Give me your location and I'll come pick all I can pack away, take cuttings or dig starts and THEN you can get goats or llamas to eat them back.

manentail
Jul. 30, 2011, 10:32 AM
Send me to your farm. I shall eat the tasty buggers!
:lol:
Or send the bushes to my farm!

neversaynever
Jul. 30, 2011, 03:21 PM
Crossbow works too after berry drop in fall or just leafed out in spring.

Watch Wee Willy
Jul. 30, 2011, 03:29 PM
Bush Hog. We had to do it twice (once a year, for two years) but now they're gone. They are tenacious though. Good luck!

Interesting sidenote: I bought some first cutting hay this year, and there are some blackberry stems and leaves in it. At first I diligently picked them out, but then I realized I couldnt get them all, and apparently he had no problem eating around the briar-y stems, and loves to eat the leaves. I thought, why not? There are a lot of people out there that pay a lot of money to feed them to their horse...:lol:

Meadow36
Jul. 30, 2011, 03:39 PM
Just bush hog, if you can get to them. This year's first growth will be next year's berry bearing. So about 3 years of regular mowing will get rid of most of them.

Yes, this ^^. We had horrible overgrowth last year. We bush hogged the field twice. This year only about a quarter of the bushes came back. We will bush hog again at the end of the summer. Every year it will get less and less.

birdsong
Jul. 30, 2011, 03:44 PM
Send me to your farm. I shall eat the tasty buggers!

I agree! And make Wine from all thats left!

PS Remedy will do it in one spraying!!

Calvincrowe
Jul. 30, 2011, 06:15 PM
You'll need a combination of cutting (hand or brush hog) and spray to truly eradicate them...oh, wait, that won't ever really happen, but you can beat them down to nearly nothing.:lol:

We use Crossbow, combined with a "spreader/sticker" stuff to make it stay on the leaves, applied in spring and fall. You'll be left with dead dry patches of canes. You'll then need to brush hog those. We find it easiest to hog them, then spray whatever comes back. Rinse, repeat.

We've used Crossbow and returned the horses to the fields the next day, as long as they have something else to eat, they aren't going to go near BB's.

Good luck--it can be done, but trust me, you want heavy equipment. You and a pair of clippers isn't going to work.

MistyBlue
Jul. 30, 2011, 11:19 PM
I'm going to guess that Crossbow is something other than you folks sitting outside shooting arrows at the blackberries? :confused:


3) Roundup or similar herbicide. Blackberries are genetically superior and laugh at puny human attempts to poison them, acquiring funny curled up leaves for a few weeks ( thereby temporarily fooling you into thinking you've won) and then regrowing with a vengeance, even more herbicide resistant, the next year.


Tell me about it. Ugh. However I can beat that...I've tried everything under the sun on a large area of Japanese Knotwood/Mexican Bamboo in my backyard. This early spring before anything greened up...I broke them off at the ground, dug up all roots and underground shooters I could find and then doused the area (and I mean soaked!) in Total Vegetation Killer. (Ground Clear)
The crap came back.
So while it was still young and growing...I re-doused with the TVK. The plants grabbed the bottle out of my hands and threw it at me. :eek: They then hurled insults at me and told me to go away before they were forced to taunt me a second time.
****ing plants. :mad:

Ring builder guy will be back to working on the ring area again this coming week. RBG has a big ol' Komatsu excavator. :D I'm planning o asking him to excavate that area out down a few feet. Mwuahahaha!

(and if I see the plants take over the Komatsu...none of y'all will be hearing from me anymore)

foggybok
Jul. 31, 2011, 02:20 AM
I'm going to guess that Crossbow is something other than you folks sitting outside shooting arrows at the blackberries? :confused:



Tell me about it. Ugh. However I can beat that...I've tried everything under the sun on a large area of Japanese Knotwood/Mexican Bamboo in my backyard. This early spring before anything greened up...I broke them off at the ground, dug up all roots and underground shooters I could find and then doused the area (and I mean soaked!) in Total Vegetation Killer. (Ground Clear)
The crap came back.
So while it was still young and growing...I re-doused with the TVK. The plants grabbed the bottle out of my hands and threw it at me. :eek: They then hurled insults at me and told me to go away before they were forced to taunt me a second time.
****ing plants. :mad:

Ring builder guy will be back to working on the ring area again this coming week. RBG has a big ol' Komatsu excavator. :D I'm planning o asking him to excavate that area out down a few feet. Mwuahahaha!

(and if I see the plants take over the Komatsu...none of y'all will be hearing from me anymore)

ah, the Knotweed wars.... We have been unsuccessful in that fight....the little buggers keep coming back...

For the blackberries....My Fjord eats them!

But I like mine, I keep a small patch......

Guilherme
Jul. 31, 2011, 07:10 AM
I just finished bush hogging a field I sprayed with 2,4,D. It killed the blackberries and the pig weed. They were both small because they'd been bushhogged earlier in the year.

The mistake most folks make with chemicals is not applying them while the plant is vigorously growing. If you don't get the poison to the root it won't work. That will happen only if the plant is growing and taking in nutrients. This means you will have to spray at least twice (for early emergence and late emergence weeds). Heavy infestations may take more.

A visit to the local county agent can often be very productive. They will have information on the specific weed types in a given area and the control programs that work in that area.

G.

sketcher
Jul. 31, 2011, 08:19 AM
I've tried everything under the sun on a large area of Japanese Knotwood/Mexican Bamboo in my backyard. This early spring before anything greened up...I broke them off at the ground, dug up all roots and underground shooters I could find and then doused the area (and I mean soaked!) in Total Vegetation Killer. (Ground Clear)
The crap came back.
So while it was still young and growing...I re-doused with the TVK. The plants grabbed the bottle out of my hands and threw it at me. :eek: They then hurled insults at me and told me to go away before they were forced to taunt me a second time.
****ing plants. :mad:


I've read that anything you do to this weed caused it is just travel and pop up somewhere else. Especially trying to dig it up. I tried two years of a scorched earth campaign and still have it. I did manager to chase a patch of it inder the road and across the street to my neighbors.

There is a special tool you can by which bores a hole into the stem at one of the joints - you do it in August when it is recharging it's roots - bore the hole and inject weed killer right into the stem and supposedly that will actually kill it.

I would also think you could just chop it and pour the herbicide down each stem. You need to buy the concentrate and us it about 10x stronger than recommended.

Maybe now that I've had time to regroup and mentally recover from the last battle I'll be trying the above.

I've been focusing on the bittersweet. That stuff is just as bad.

suz
Jul. 31, 2011, 10:22 AM
we used to have knotweed too, until we got goats. it took a few years, as they only found the new shoots tasty and they were not confined to the knotweed site.
but today we have NO knotweed, and NO thorny berries anywhere the goats roam.
my goats are worth their weight in gold for that alone.

Frank B
Jul. 31, 2011, 10:32 AM
Goats (http://online.wsj.com/video/rent-a-goats-horning-in-on-gardening-jobs/AC229CBB-030A-4160-9C28-EBB124D811C1.html), followed by periodic bush hogging.

Hampton Bay
Jul. 31, 2011, 11:04 AM
Mow them down, and then go back when they're just started to sprout again and spray them with the Roundup meant for poison ivy. Mix it a little bit strong to be safe. Spray on new growth, and that should keep them away for a bit.

Wayside
Jul. 31, 2011, 01:20 PM
I'm going to guess that Crossbow is something other than you folks sitting outside shooting arrows at the blackberries? :confused:


It's an herbicide: http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ld6U1002.pdf

I've never understood why the pasture downtime for Crossbow is so low. It's basically 2,4-D plus triclopyr. Maybe a synergistic effect allows you to use less of each ingredient? :confused:

Anyhow, triclopyr does generally do a pretty good job killing brush. It's the active ingredient in Brush-B-Gone, among other things.

You can increse the effectiveness of herbicides with good timing, too. As G. mentioned, it's important to do it when plants are actively growing. During bloom is an effective time to spray many plants, as they are diverting a lot of their resources toward reproduction, and don't have as many reserves to help them recover from trauma.

While you can weaken them by mowing, etc, mowing also reduces the surface available to catch and retain spray so it can actually work against you in some cases. Though in some cases it's necessary, since the sheer mass of vegetation is impractical to spray.

When using 2,4-D or triclopyr, it is also very important to use enough. They are both Auxin (growth hormone) regulators, which basically work by making the plant essentially grow itself to death. Small amounts will actually increase growth, though, which is exactly what you don't want to have happen.

grayarabpony
Jul. 31, 2011, 10:16 PM
We have blackberries everywhere here. We just mow them with the tractor. Blackberries will always pop up or seed dropped from birds will sprout, that's the nature of blackberries.

carolprudm
Aug. 1, 2011, 12:03 PM
we used to have knotweed too, until we got goats. it took a few years, as they only found the new shoots tasty and they were not confined to the knotweed site.
but today we have NO knotweed, and NO thorny berries anywhere the goats roam.
my goats are worth their weight in gold for that alone.

Yup, goats if you have good fence. I keep goats on one pasture since the fence around the other is not good enough. The difference in weeds is amazing

kookicat
Aug. 1, 2011, 03:35 PM
Maybe you should just start a pick your own fruit farm. :lol: