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View Full Version : What do you use for jump rails/ where to get them ?



SWpreciousfew
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:28 PM
I did a search but couldn't get any other threads to come up, so apologies if this has been beaten to death!

We are building jumps (aka the boyfriend is building me jumps, love him! :D) and he has asked me what and where to get the rails from.... I kind of blanked out. I know some people use the landscaping railroad ties but Id really like to find some 12' poles so they are "real" fences lol.For our old jumps we occasionally used old fence rails but they were not of the jump cup variety, they had pegs and the rails sat on them, not in them like the rails do in jump cups. I think for safety sake the rails won't really work with the jump cups.

He has the standards all built and they look fantastic, he is even going to paint them in my colors :) Any ideas and/or past experiences on the rails/poles?

JSwan
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:43 PM
I just picked 10 up at the feed store. A COTH poster told me where to get them. Pressure treated poles - they came in 10' and 12'. Fit right in to jump cups.

Check your local co-op/feed store.

wsmoak
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:47 PM
I just use trees that we cut down when thinning. My favorite is poplar, nice and straight! :D

You can get 4x4's and rip a triangle off each corner to make octagonal poles. (Curiously, the stores here only have 14' lumber, not 12'.)

The round poles might have to be special ordered, I've never seen them in stock anywhere.

I've just used landscape timbers before too. They are fine for verticals but make for some very narrow cross rails!

horsepoor
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:21 PM
We use the 10' posts from the local farm store -- they come in different widths and if you look at them, you'll be able to judge the right size (I think the ones we get are the 3 to 4 inch size, but not sure as it has been awhile). I've always done 10' wide jumps rather than 12' as those are better in a small ring, which we always seem to have, easier to store, and lighter in weight to carry. But I think you can get the posts in 12' lengths as well.

They aren't as perfectly smooth and even as milled round rails, but much cheaper and I've painted them and they do fine.

The other option is to get 4"x4" square lumber and knock the edges off to make an octagon shape, but that always seemed like too much work for me. We had it done once, and the guy doing the work burnt up his saw in the process, so we never tried it again!

SWpreciousfew
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:30 PM
Awesome! The fence poles from the farm store and the 4x4 trimming sound like great ideas! Thanks! :yes:

manentail
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:57 PM
I buy thick PVC at lowes and put tape on for color instead of painting, lasts longer. If you need more weight, there are weighted ends you can buy but not sure where.

GingerJumper
Jul. 29, 2011, 02:04 PM
I use PVC poles... They work fine for my barn since all the horses there are pretty careful, but if you have a less careful jumper you're probably going to want to get pressure treated wood poles. Knocking down what is essentially a small, straight tree makes a little more of an impression than knocking down a plastic tube lol.

shakeytails
Jul. 29, 2011, 02:07 PM
Just curious because I don't jump...

Would it be better to use 2 2x4s glued together with corners knocked off rather than a 4x4s? Generally (properly) glued lumber is more stable than solid pieces. Any time I've left a 4x4 laying around for any length of time it twists and warps. Or don't they warp once you make them into octagons?

Foxtrot's
Jul. 29, 2011, 03:57 PM
We get ours from the lumber yards. It is an item they carry in normal inventory.

I was able to get my jump cups made at the local high school as a shop project for cost of materials. A few kids were behind on turning in projects and needed something as a 'make-up' and did them for me.

mg
Jul. 29, 2011, 04:17 PM
I got 10' round fencing rails and sawed off the ends (they had pegs). I like having the "skinnier" jumps because it makes the jumps feel so wide when I go to shows! PVC freaks me out because of the way it splinters when it breaks.

subk
Jul. 29, 2011, 04:49 PM
Jumps by Fuzzy is local even though he supplies jumps for many big venues across the country. I drive a few miles to Fuzzy's warehouse and buy some of his used stock at a discount. It's kind of like cheating.

goodhors
Jul. 29, 2011, 05:32 PM
We also do the treated 4"x4", cut the corners off to make octagons. They roll when needed, stay put when needed. Better than round rails.

If the wood is very green with preservative, means they are wet so they may warp. I get ours and stack them so they are flat, with wood pieces to hold them level in place while they dry out. Doesn't seem to take long to dry, especially in the sunshine. Giving them a coat or two of paint or outdoor stain, helps them be more stable and not warp much after drying.

You can get cheapy paint from stores selling paint, wrong color mixes etc.. I may have them add some more white for lightest possible color, before using on the rails or standards. Good way to protect the wood in the sun, lasts a fairly long time.

Husband wanted to do rails as quick as possible, so never did the glue thing. I think I would prefer the solid rail, no seams to collect water or glue to fail in expected long life of a rail.

We have 10ft rails, easier to move, still gives the horse plenty of space between the standards. 12ft rails get heavy if you need to move them a lot. Practicing with 10ft wide jumps at home, horse is used to them, leaves PLENTY of room for 12ft rails used at shows!

I never use the PVC rails. Teaches horse bad habits of dragging a foot and not getting stung with weight of wood. Some horses learn that PVC is EASY to just smash into, won't jump. Lastly, is that even heavywall PVC is NOT designed for sunshine use, gets brittle. Horse banging a plastic rail can shatter the whole tube, making for MANY VERY SHARP plastic pieces on the ground to land on. I know this because I owned the lazy footed horse, who knocked down a rail that shattered. But she STOPPED instantly when I said WHOA! My kid was riding. Horse did not move a muscle, and didn't get cut up by a miracle. Missed the back of all her pasterns by fractions of an inch. Stood while I cleaned up the sharp pieces. That was the LAST time we have ever jumped PVC rails. I hauled my own wood rails for practice afterwards.

SWpreciousfew
Jul. 29, 2011, 06:55 PM
PVC is a no go for me. Mine has no respect for it. Rails HAVE to have plenty of weight to them... or just look like wood. He knows the difference. Rarely touches it if he knows it's wood. PVC on the other hand he'll just lazily drag his feet through.

Lots of good ideas!

Robin@DHH
Jul. 29, 2011, 08:55 PM
Check with a fencing supply dealer in your area. Some
fence posts have to be 12' long (for example, to put in
a fence for elk or deer being raised domestically). Those
fences are 8' high and you need to go 4' down for
stability. The treated fence posts are less likely to warp
than 4x4s. You can get posts in 3.5" diameter if you
want light ones, but the 4" and 5" are more durable.

MeghanDACVA
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:34 PM
3", schedule 40 PVC pipe. You want schedule 40, NOT light wt drain pipe.
If you are happy with 10' rails, it comes in 10 and 20' lengths. If you want 12 ft, etc rails you will need to get the 20' sections and deal with the waste.

In reference to the horse above that has no respect for PVC rails, it is prob because they are the lightwt drain pipe and/or don't have anything in them for weight.

Get a plain 2 x 4, don't need treated. Rip the edges so it fits TIGHTLY inside the pipe. They add wt to the rail.

Get end caps for the 3" pipe and glue them on with PVC glue.

Some people fill them with sand, or partially fill them. But the sand shifts left and right.

UpperFallsFarm
Jul. 30, 2011, 07:45 AM
I got 10' round fencing rails and sawed off the ends (they had pegs). I like having the "skinnier" jumps because it makes the jumps feel so wide when I go to shows! PVC freaks me out because of the way it splinters when it breaks.

We have had PVC poles from Lowes for 6 years and I have never had one splinter. They do break but it is always clean.

MeghanDACVA
Jul. 30, 2011, 11:59 AM
We have had PVC poles from Lowes for 6 years and I have never had one splinter. They do break but it is always clean.

'Tis the reason to use the schedule 40 pipe. Most people just buy what is cheapest, which is the thin walled drainage pipe. And it does splinter.

I bet flyingk's pipe is schedule 40?

baysngreys
Jul. 31, 2011, 03:24 PM
12' 4"X4" 's, set the table saw blade at 45 degrees and saw off the corners. I built all my standards, 10 pairs, and made all my poles and panels. Old fence boards make great panels, just notch the ends so they sit in the cups.

Coat of paint helps them last out in the weather and always store them flat/level.

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 31, 2011, 04:15 PM
I have always used 4 inch PVC pipes. I think they are 10' long. I love them. I paint them however I want and they last forever. I have had some for over 12 years and I just repainted them. They are lightweight and east to see. I have used landscape timbers but I do not like them as well.

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 31, 2011, 04:24 PM
3", schedule 40 PVC pipe. You want schedule 40, NOT light wt drain pipe.
If you are happy with 10' rails, it comes in 10 and 20' lengths. If you want 12 ft, etc rails you will need to get the 20' sections and deal with the waste.

In reference to the horse above that has no respect for PVC rails, it is prob because they are the lightwt drain pipe and/or don't have anything in them for weight.

Get a plain 2 x 4, don't need treated. Rip the edges so it fits TIGHTLY inside the pipe. They add wt to the rail.

Get end caps for the 3" pipe and glue them on with PVC glue.

That's a great idea if you need more weight! My mare has always been a careful jumper and never even touches groundrails though.

Hunter Mom
Jul. 31, 2011, 04:30 PM
Check with a show in your area to see if the company they get fences from will sell their used stuff. I know Fuzzy gets about $40 per pole (striped) when he sells them after shows if he has them. Then they're all pretty and painted to last, too.

hightide
Jul. 31, 2011, 06:27 PM
To be honest, I made my poles by buying pre cut (like someone else, it's nice to have them short so when you go to a show the jumps seem so wide!) 10' of PVC pipes, which do have some random letters/numbers on them but I can live with that. You can get thick ones, which are indeed thick, but light enough that they're not too too bad for moving/carrying around. I then went nuts with the colored duct tape from my local Target and made all my jump poles pretty and colorful from that! :winkgrin: You cnan't see it very well, but here's (http://img29.imageshack.us/img29/715/photo06051850.jpg) one of my jumps — white poles, orange and lime green duct tape. And no, the jump blocks are blue, not purple (but they make purple ones, too).

Amwrider
Aug. 1, 2011, 12:18 AM
You can also do planks instead of rails on one or two jumps. Take a 2 x 8 that is 10 or 12 foot long and notch the ends by taking off about a 2 x 5 or 6 piece.

We did one jump this way with two planks. The base coat is a medium blue and we laid the planks on the ground even with each other and then "splatter" painted them with pink, lavendar, white and light blue. The jump came out very nicely. We concentrated a little more of the white paint in the center to give the riders a visual center point.

gumtree
Aug. 1, 2011, 11:40 AM
I see you are in South East PA. If so call Esch Fencing 610 857 1676 they carry them. On Rt 10 about 4-5 miles north of Rt 30 bottem of the long hill on right.

gumtree
Aug. 1, 2011, 11:48 AM
For those that use 3 inch white PVC drain pipe and want a little more substance and less bounce you can fill them with expansion foal. Two ways, buy a contractor gun the excepts the large cans and has the long nozzle, attach a longer tube so that you can get most of the way in from either side and slide out as you fill. Or the home owner cans and drill several holes the size of the straw that comes with it along the pipe and fill. Don’t over fill or you will be wasting money. A bit of trial and error until you get a feel for the amount.

gumtree
Aug. 1, 2011, 11:50 AM
Meant to say expansion FOAM. Had foals on the mind this morning having had to ship some out this morning.

FitToBeTied
Aug. 1, 2011, 12:18 PM
I get 4x4's and round the corners with a router. Those are my top rails. For fill and ground rails I use PVC. They're cheaper and easier to move around.

kcmel
Aug. 1, 2011, 01:14 PM
Stockton lumber supply in Unionville carries them.

SWpreciousfew
Aug. 1, 2011, 06:12 PM
I had forgotten about Esch's! They are only 2 miles down the road from us! And Unionville is only a ten minute drive so Ill have to give them both a call :)

kookicat
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:43 AM
I use PVC poles... They work fine for my barn since all the horses there are pretty careful, but if you have a less careful jumper you're probably going to want to get pressure treated wood poles. Knocking down what is essentially a small, straight tree makes a little more of an impression than knocking down a plastic tube lol.

PVC pipe can shatter into sharp bits if it gets stepped on or hit hard. It gets quite fragile in really cold conditions.

hightide
Aug. 2, 2011, 10:52 AM
PVC pipe can shatter into sharp bits if it gets stepped on or hit hard. It gets quite fragile in really cold conditions.

Yup. I only use the weighted, thicker ones for that reason — doesn't matter how careful the horse is, I don't want him getting hurt. I also bring my poles into the barn in the winter, since I don't jump in the winter.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 2, 2011, 01:54 PM
I just use trees that we cut down when thinning. My favorite is poplar, nice and straight! :D

You can get 4x4's and rip a triangle off each corner to make octagonal poles. (Curiously, the stores here only have 14' lumber, not 12'.)

The round poles might have to be special ordered, I've never seen them in stock anywhere.

I've just used landscape timbers before too. They are fine for verticals but make for some very narrow cross rails!

I ordered 10' (lighter and better in the indoor than 12') 4x4's and had them ripped down as described above. Love them. I ordered them from the local lumber mill, because for a few more cents a pole then the big box stores, they would do the saw work AND deliver them to the farm! Plus it is nice to support the locally owned stores when I can.

For my "flower boxes" I drilled holes into landscape timbers and stuffed them with fake flowers. They work well because they have two flatter sides, so they stay upright. Did put the hole all the way through so if water gets in there it will drain out.

They, along with my beautiful white standards, all look great sitting in the second guest bedroom. *sigh*

Blugal
Aug. 2, 2011, 06:48 PM
Just picked up 20 landscape timbers, 8' long, from Home Depot for $2 each - they are stained "cherry" which is actually sort of orange. I don't care, for $2 each I'll take it, and no painting! (I got another load last month for $3 each, still cheaper than the $5 or so locally).

I have paid for treated 3-4" rounds in the past, but I priced them this year at $7 each - the decision was made for me.